Got solar, changed to LED, what next?

ale.istotle

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Quite the zombie thread. Aug 2016 to Jan 2022.
Seems like a lot of energy to heat the gas stream to 100-120C unless maybe you can use waste heat. Interesting overall.
 

buster poser

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Not knowing your climate and all that, I would say a wild or xeriscaped garden is pretty efficient with another important resource. Also no more fuel/charging for mowers and other tools, happy bees and birds, etc
 

maxvintage

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I just read a really interesting article on pumping water as a form of energy storage to manage grid demand:


Basically authors located sites were there are lakes or reservoirs in a elevation relationship such that you can pump water up during peak times and then generate power as it flows down in off peak.

The article includes a link to an "atlas" of thousands of potential sites worldwide. It's very interesting--clearly not problem free, but also potentially viable.
 

imwjl

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My mom's basement.
I'm not ready to make a big change with my house or the cabin but am considering a portable battery and solar charger that could accommodate the demands of my work needing cellular phone and laptop charged. I've known the Goal Zero brand and see others.

Our cabin could be off grid except we do keep a small refrigerator/freezer running 1/2 the year and would need to power the well pump beyond what I'm considering could do.
 

1293

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We're making the transition as bulbs die. We don't use a whole lot of power.
20170818_121320.jpg
 

billy logan

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Way to be, 1293 (post #69)

I'm stingy with the power also, to the point the man came out to see if my remote-reporting electric meter wasn't broken :lol:
You've got an outfit there (the electric utility co.) that wants people to buy LESS of their product? That's cool. I guess they don't want to build more generating capacity.

Don't mean to appear anti-conservation, just wondering. What if?>
How does that work out if the "average neighbors" become "efficient neighbors," drastic reductions?

I remember Johnny Carson noting that the water utility asked everybody to reduce their use, then it imposed a fee to make up the $$$ deficit.

I guess if a region has copious clean electricity it makes no difference ecologically whether you conserve or not? I'm looking at you, Canada and Norway :)
 
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Duck Herder

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Seems technology is coming on so fast. We have the solar panels, swapped out the Tungsten bulbs for LEDs, got air source heating, went over to induction hobs, have plans to go over to thermostatic radiator valves, replaced the petrol car with a small turbo-diesel (an extra 30 mpg is hard to ignore)... I know some think it's daft tree-hugging BS, but it makes a difference to the bills, which means more money for important things, like guitars

So, what is up and coming? What is the new Big Thing in efficiency? By which I mean, now affordable, accessible, and as good to use as what it replaces.
Eating fake meat made from mealworms that were fed fermented soybean husks.
 

telemnemonics

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I just read a really interesting article on pumping water as a form of energy storage to manage grid demand:


Basically authors located sites were there are lakes or reservoirs in a elevation relationship such that you can pump water up during peak times and then generate power as it flows down in off peak.

The article includes a link to an "atlas" of thousands of potential sites worldwide. It's very interesting--clearly not problem free, but also potentially viable.
Certainly makes sense and we've also heard of spinning big flywheels up then harnessing the decay but I wonder how much of the energy used to pump water uphill is actually saved vs lost? Has to be significant losses in running electric pumps then running turbine generators?
OTOH brushless motor tech gets more output from less consumption now that in the past.
Are huge pump motors now the high tech low consumption?

Might be possible in small subsistence applications too, get or build wood water tanks and fill them when the sun shines and/ or the wind blows then generate the return in dark calm cold.
Assuming on site plentiful watert and a handy hill or rooftop with suitable structure.
That's the basic problem with something like Mainers subsistence lifestyle that's been practiced for the last 60 years, solar hot water and windmills for electricity and pumping, but no way to store energy aside from sweat equity cutting firewood which does work but doesn't keep the venison frozen. Solar hot water may only go back 50 years here but lots of Mainers were doing a variety of small scale wind and solar power for practical home use starting in the '60s.
Not even counting the windmills going back I guess centuries.

Much of the modern eco theory is based on luxsumption society demands.
Eco energy for non eco usage is a losing battle!
Trim down all the luxy waste and many of the eco tech ideas become more viable.
 




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