Got an electric car

bgmacaw

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All the naysayers I know seem to have a harder time than the actual owners.

Thanks for linking to the map. It confirms what I had already observed, that there are no public charging stations close to rural destinations I have to travel to for business and family. In GA, AL and TN, it gets pretty sparse once you get outside major cities and away from interstates. I guess this will change over the next 10 years though.
 

imwjl

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Thanks for linking to the map. It confirms what I had already observed, that there are no public charging stations close to rural destinations I have to travel to for business and family. In GA, AL and TN, it gets pretty sparse once you get outside major cities and away from interstates. I guess this will change over the next 10 years though.

Two of my EV owning associates say their app-based travel is usually ahead of that official map. I know it's been true at times in my area. I looked with way more detail when we made that recent car purchase decision.

It will change a lot faster than 10 years based on my reading financial news. IIRC, maybe ChargePoint, but just one of the larger non-Tesla networks was stating a 10% or so to 50% plus growth rate depending on region.

My boss and a best friend probably illustrate the adventurous vs cautious EV traveler. Even the cautious one admits he's had fewer issues than expected. He's got a more basic 1 motor Model 3. My boss has an advantage with the explicit long range upgrade on their Model Y and Model 3.

What really stands out to me is a friend in construction trades. This might not work out for all. He's got a std cab work pickup and the family car is not a long range EV. He says they rent something 3-5x a year feeling it's far superior via renting what's perfect for the trip while owning what's perfect for daily life.
 

bgmacaw

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Two of my EV owning associates say their app-based travel is usually ahead of that official map.

I've noticed that Walgreens is working on installing EV chargers at many of their locations.

What would really tip the balance would be if WalMart and/or Dollar General started installing them at a lot of their locations. I bet this would be a significant income stream for them in years to come, not only from charging but from store foot traffic as well.
 

littlebadboy

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imwjl

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I've noticed that Walgreens is working on installing EV chargers at many of their locations.

What would really tip the balance would be if WalMart and/or Dollar General started installing them at a lot of their locations. I bet this would be a significant income stream for them in years to come, not only from charging but from store foot traffic as well.

What will really tip the balance is more makers not being battery constrained.

The chicken and egg relationship might move around a bit on charge stations. At our flagship store the mall management got charge stations after seeing a few Teslas years ago. Now I see what looks like an out of balance high concentration of EVs there. It could be the charge stations helping but the buyer demographic for the EVs and that store are similar. That store's customers skew towards more educated and not just higher income and same for the EV buyers.

We probably see so many EVs in this area (close to home) more from education than income. Our other store near higher income has lower education levels. That shows in what food people buy, what they look like, and likely in what they drive to go shopping.
 

otterhound

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What will really tip the balance is more makers not being battery constrained.

The chicken and egg relationship might move around a bit on charge stations. At our flagship store the mall management got charge stations after seeing a few Teslas years ago. Now I see what looks like an out of balance high concentration of EVs there. It could be the charge stations helping but the buyer demographic for the EVs and that store are similar. That store's customers skew towards more educated and not just higher income and same for the EV buyers.

We probably see so many EVs in this area (close to home) more from education than income. Our other store near higher income has lower education levels. That shows in what food people buy, what they look like, and likely in what they drive to go shopping.
Imagine that .
 

imwjl

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Imagine that .

My car sales friends say things will change the instant availability changes and not demographics driving sales of more expensive cars. They are at GM, VW and a Stellantis/Nissan dealer. My acquaintance who sells Fords claims pent up demand for that pickup is strong and just plain old Ford customers buy that electric SUV.

My friend who got the 2nd/new gen Bolt is an engineering professional but just hates wasting money on cars. He felt GM did well with the recall and they love their Bolt EV (not the "crossover" EUV as GM calls it). I consider them representative of just common sense car buyers.

It took me a month to get a VW service appointment and the service dept manager apologized saying it's part fueled by many of their customers doing maintenance and repair investments waiting for more EVs.
 

otterhound

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My car sales friends say things will change the instant availability changes and not demographics driving sales of more expensive cars. They are at GM, VW and a Stellantis/Nissan dealer. My acquaintance who sells Fords claims pent up demand for that pickup is strong and just plain old Ford customers buy that electric SUV.

My friend who got the 2nd/new gen Bolt is an engineering professional but just hates wasting money on cars. He felt GM did well with the recall and they love their Bolt EV (not the "crossover" EUV as GM calls it). I consider them representative of just common sense car buyers.

It took me a month to get a VW service appointment and the service dept manager apologized saying it's part fueled by many of their customers doing maintenance and repair investments waiting for more EVs.
Imagine that .
 

bgmacaw

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We probably see so many EVs in this area (close to home) more from education than income. Our other store near higher income has lower education levels. That shows in what food people buy, what they look like, and likely in what they drive to go shopping.

What's going to be interesting in my area in the next few years is that Rivian is opening a factory here. While they're pretty pricey vehicles, I wonder if that will shift anything on local thinking about EVs. Right now, in pickup truck Redneckia, EVs are mostly driven by college professors and professionals who live here and work elsewhere.
 

DrBGood

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For the moment, one important factor in driving a EV for long distances, is the availability of fat charging stations. If you only do local and have a charger at home, there's no reason not to get an EV. Nice thing is you ALWAYS leave the house with a full battery.

We've looked into it and also came to the conclusion that 90% of our driving was within 30-40km. So 2 years ago we got a used 2016 Chevy Spark EV for around 10K USD and it has been the best investment ever. That thing is like a go-kart on steroids with its 327 lb-ft of torque. I never thought I would enjoy such a small car that much. I'm always smiling when driving it.

Yes, its range is very limited with only 130km available in summer. That cuts by half winter comes, with cabin heating, snowy roads, heavy friction winter tires and all. We don't care, it still brings us where we want. On a fast charger, it takes like 12 minutes to get the batteries to 80% at a cost of ±$1.

In summer, if we want to go for longer distances, there are apps to plan where you'll recharge. Wife went for a 3½ hour business trip last summer. She had to stop 3 times 10 minutes on the way to recharge. She said she never got to that destination that relaxed before. It is a different set of mind to drive an EV. First few months, you have to get pass the fear of getting stuck with no more juice in the batteries. You get the hang of it as you get better at planning your route.

One other great factor is how small the maintenance schedule is. No more oil change, oil filters, air filter, spark plugs, exhaust system, etc, etc. All you basically have to look for is tires, suspension and brakes. About brakes ... here we'll eventually have to work on them because of rusting for the lack of use. If you mostly rely on regeneration to slow down the car, it does it very well, you're only using your brakes for the last few feet before the stop sign or light. I disable the heavy regeneration function, using the brakes like on a regular car, it has the same regeneration effect on the batteries and "saves" my brake pads and disks from rusting.

I also have to say we are lucky in Quebec to have cheap electric power and a lot of fast charging stations. Most Petro Canada gas stations now have a couple of fast chargers.

We also have a Toyota van for longer distances (500km and more) for we carry lots of sport gear. But the days such a vehicle comes as an EV, we'll surely switch and become 100% electric. Once you taste it, you don't want to return to dinosaur juice.
 

Jim_in_PA

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CharlieO

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'Easily proven the other way' works both ways, doesn't it?

It is embarrassing to say that recycling nasty chemicals exists and accept that it's happening when in fact you hit it on the head - nascent industry.

Solar panels have been around for decades, they recycle what they can, but the nasty stuff still isn't. Tesla does bury stuff in the desert. And to say recycling relationships exist with GM and Ford means little when they don't have electric cars old enough to need new batteries, or electric cars at all!

Hasn't the plastic problem been around long enough to clue us in that good intentions mean little unless it is addressed? We can look on the bright side or look at reality.


What is your problem with the recycling of chemicals and EV batteries being a "nascent industry" when the electric vehicle industry itself is relatively new? As you yourself said, very few EVs are at the point where they need to have their batteries replaced, and those batteries that have been replaced are usually repurposed. There is also a very strong and active market for used batteries and motors from wrecked EVs including Teslas, Chevy Volts, Nissan Leafs, etc. So again, where is the problem?

Concerning the recycling of solar panels, a lot has changed in the past three years or so, but further change needs to come much more quickly. The US is still far behind the European Union on this issue, but several states have begun to act to encourage or force recycling. The federal government needs to get serious about enacting and enforcing new regulations.

https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2020/12...-issue-that-could-harm-growth-and-reputation/

https://www.epa.gov/hw/solar-panel-recycling

One more thing: What exactly is Tesla burying in the desert? Can you provide a link to current information on this?
 

Milspec

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I will always be in the low-tech fandom when it comes to cars...I want to be in control instead of the computers, but I am a bit of a caveman.

It is cool though and for a work commuter, probably ideal, but I do ask every owner of an electric to remember one very important thing....no pedestrian can hear you coming up behind them. I have nearly been run over by Tesla owners in my town because I never heard it coming up behind me and so I nearly ended up walking right into their path. It really is something electric drivers need to be very aware of at all times, they are in stealth mode in an otherwise noisey world.
 

Recce

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Put a $100 deposit on a Tesla CyberTruck. With the number of deposits I am looking at a 2+ year waiting list. My Ford F150 will be 10 years old by then and ready to upgrade. Time will tell if something better comes along by then.
Ford is coming out with an F150 EV. You don’t need to get the Tesla.
I am buying, currently waiting, on a new Ford Bronco. It is probably the last all ICE vehicle I will buy.
I have tried reading the comparisons on ICE versus EV here both for usage and energy use. My eyes started crossing and I gazed into never never land. Y’all enjoy your argument.
 

Space Pickle

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I will always be in the low-tech fandom when it comes to cars...I want to be in control instead of the computers, but I am a bit of a caveman.

It is cool though and for a work commuter, probably ideal, but I do ask every owner of an electric to remember one very important thing....no pedestrian can hear you coming up behind them. I have nearly been run over by Tesla owners in my town because I never heard it coming up behind me and so I nearly ended up walking right into their path. It really is something electric drivers need to be very aware of at all times, they are in stealth mode in an otherwise noisey world.

This is true, although a lot of EVs do make a noise to alert pedestrians. My leaf has a backup beep beep like a big truck. :p
 

boxocrap

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A Kia Niro. It's basically a small SUV like a Rav4. We decided to lease it to see how we would like it--Kia was offering good lease deals.

The car tells me it's got 280 miles of range on a full charge. We shall see.

But wow the pick-up. This is not a particularly sporty car but in "sport" mode it really flies. It's 0-60 in 6.7 seconds in "normal" mode, not especially fast, but the instant torque is really remarkable. It's there at every speed: from 0 or at 60 mph, step on the accelerator pedal and it's instant.

The regenerative braking takes some getting used to but it was starting to feel comfortable on the first day. The car sends me emails about its state of charge. Just what i need, more emails. It makes kind of vaguely spaceship noises instead of engine revs.

I went to the local hardware store while out doing some errands and there was a guy with a really cherry maybe 64 or 65 mustang, and he was revving the engine loudly and smoking the tires driving around the parking lot, which seemed like a bad idea, see below, and then he revved it loudly and drove fast with smoking tires out of the parking lot and onto the street. It was a nice car and I can't blame him for wanting to show off although seriously dude this parking lot? There's a hardware and variety store where the blue dot is: people are walking right out onto the drive all the time.


lot.jpeg


But it was kind of ironic--the Kia would accelerate faster with no smoking tires and no noise. I realize the noise and the smoke are the point for the guy racing around a crowded parking lot like an idiot, but it was an interesting moment. Loud fast and dangerous and antique vs quiet, fast, efficient and safe. I'd like smoking the tires in that mustang, but not in an semi-urban parking lot.
we are considering a hybrid car as our next ( and maybe last) vehicle..i take trips that are fairly long distance with no reliable charging stations available..so a gas backup is required..i look forward to the time of 1000 miles between charges..currently we have a ford fiesta a 1 litre engine automatic..it's a real city car easy to park very good mpg..etc..but not a car for long distance highway driving..it gets tossed around a little on the road what with crosswinds and such
 

bholder

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This is true, although a lot of EVs do make a noise to alert pedestrians. My leaf has a backup beep beep like a big truck. :p
Yeah Tesla has an external speaker for this now too. Can even play music or us it as a PA. My 2018 Model 3 doesn't have the speaker though, I would need to get a retrofit.
 




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