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Gluing body blank properly

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by newuser1, Oct 20, 2020.

  1. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    I bought 2 already squared pieces of poplar sized 1-3/4" x 7" x 22". I ran them trough a jointer just in case and I planed them down to 1-5/8 as I'm going to use them for Jaguar body. I put them together on a flat surface to test the fit and everything looked great.

    I've just glued them together using 6 clamps and a few minutes later I noticed that they were glued at a very slight angle instead of being in the same plane as they should. I removed the clamps and tried to un-glue the pieces, but it was too late they were glued together rock solid. I put 4 of the 6 clamps on one side trying to compensate for the out-of-plane problem, but this didn't help at all.

    How can I avoid such issues going forward? Am I over-clamping? Should I clamp some flat wood/metal pieces perpendicular to the glue joint to keep the 2 pieces in the same plane?

    What is your process of gluing body blanks?
     
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  2. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    If the two pieces are not on the same plane, your jointer's fence is not at 90 degrees to the table.

    Also, do not plane to final thickness until after your glue-up is complete. Having a little extra to remove from each side would've allowed you to plane your imperfect glue-up perfectly flat to final thickness.
     
  3. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Sometimes over clamping can cause that as well. As peegoo mentioned you have to be sure your jointer is setup right. Then dry fit and check both sides - front and back. I don't clamp the seam super hard and look for the squeeze out then stop until just nice and snug. I have 2 pieces of quartz countertop material that I clamp on top perpendicular to the seam. It's heavy stuff so that helps. That way your putting downward pressure at the same time and keeping the 2 pieces flat. Your issue has happened to me before and it's a pain to try and fix as I don't have a drum sander or a planer wide enough to flatten it.
     
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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I talk about gluing up and jointing in this thread. I like to arrange the wood and then put slash marks on the joints and number or letter A//A B//B C//C them so the boards can be placed up against the fence to get complementary angles. A good joint requires little clamp pressure. If you are using bar clamps you may want to alternate them on the body every other one up on top and the next under the wood. Lastly, make sure the pressure is on the middle of the edges of the boards being glued up. Once in a while I'll put a piece of scrap between the clamp pad and the edge of the wood to ensure the pressure is centered.


    If I can, I clamp the blank in a bench vise with the wood stacking upwards and the bar clamps sitting vertical. My best glue joints have occurred when I started using a card scraper on the knife nick micro- fibers off before gluing.

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/lets-make-a-body.1017362/


    In the picture below you can see the angled marks. Each mark has to be facing the fence in the same way at the same direction to get the same joint angle. My jointer is a cheap MIC early Jet version and it flexes if you press too hard.


    joints.png



    Here is one clamp arrangement, the pipe clamps flex as to most clamps today. Notice how they are facing the ends of the blank and the spring clamps hold the two pieces in position, although C-clamps work better at this, they leave a black mark from the glue-metal reaction.

    clamped.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2020
  5. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Thanks guys,

    This was all very helpful!
     
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  6. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    My process isn't far removed from yours...and pretty much in align with what others have said. I do all my glue-ups oversized so that I don't worry much about misalignment. I thickness then after glue-up if I have a wide enough thickness planer. Now that I no longer have access to a wide planer, I will probably just thickness them by hand (plane, scraper, etc.).

    If I have to glue up more accurately, I always use a cross brace of some sort. Usually it is just another piece of wood that has a verified straight/true surface. Glue is usually pretty slippery initially and stuff will slide around before it gets to a high tack.

    Also, having worked with a variety of bonding agents, it is sometimes better not to clamp too hard. You can 'starve' a joint by squeezing the bond-line too small. This is rarely a problem with wood.
     
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  7. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm in the same area as trapdoor2, in that if I can glue them up over sized I will. Then take them down to the needed dimensions when I am ready to build. I also use a marble threshold tacked with 60 or 80 grit sandpaper to finesse the joint edges prior to glue. This usually leaves me with an invisible joint line on the finished piece.
     
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  8. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    Since some clamps can apply more pressure to the side at the point on which one places the clamps.. Thus, I place two on each side... I also check to insure the two sections being glued are level relative to each other... before the glue begins setting up..

    other little considerations.. NEVER buy lumber already planed to the thickness of the finished guitar.. you want to plane it to the thickness after the glue-up.. and yellow wood glue is as good a glue as you can find... Using dowels, or "biscuits" are not necessary.. absolutely nothing is gained..

    r
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
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  9. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you don't have a thickness planer large enough, your local cabinetmaker's shop does. Give 'em a call and see if they can run your blank through the planer for you.

    Most placed will do it no charge, but take a dozen donuts and a container of coffee as a show of gratitude, and you will be welcome back anytime.
     
  10. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    Starting off with a proper jointer is the correct beginning . Planer or thickness sander afterwards .
     
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  11. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Jointing technique matters. While the goal is always to have the jointer fence perfectly perpendicular to the bed, the real world (and Murphy) are what they are. So sometimes it's necessary to edge joint both pieces simultaneously or in a specific sequence, so they get "complementary angles" if that perpendicular goal isn't met.
     
  12. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    The fences on cheep(er) jointers are a bugger. I do two things.

    1. I have a 2x4 to put against the fence as the fence is a bit flimsy.

    2. I mark 'I' and 'O' on my boards. The one with 'I' on I put against the 2x4 and the one with 'O' faces away from the 2x4.

    Any difference from the 90 degrees you're after is 'cancelled' out then.

    jointer.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
  13. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity

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    Yup. learned that one in Wood Shop around the 8th grade... it kept me outta trouble.. well some of the time... :D

    r
     
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  14. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    I have access to both drum sander and a planer which are wide enough for my glued-up blank. The jointer I use is a professional grade and is regularly checked and maintained by experienced wood workers. When I dry fitted the 2 pieces they were perfect fit.

    Should try fixing the cup in my blank with the drum sander first? Should I start with the cup facing up like this ^?


    Thanks,

    Peter
     
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  15. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    Did my head in trying to work that out. I knew it had to work out somehow. :eek:
     
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  16. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    Question is, does slight curve in the back matter? You'd like the front flat for your bridge , pups but, the back?
     
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  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    That's what I'd do, otherwise it'll rock unless you put something under the other side to prop it up. You lose quite a bit though when you have to take material off both sides until it is flat and parallel.
     
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  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    It would matter to me....:)...YMMV
     
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  19. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Yes, it matter to me too :)
     
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  20. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    What! No one into arched bottom guitars? :lol::lol::lol:

    Yes #guitarbuilder, I hadn't thought of that. Good point.
     
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