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Glue types

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by roflcopter, Mar 1, 2011.

  1. roflcopter

    roflcopter TDPRI Member

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    I've been preparing for my build challenge build and it's going to be my first one. And I have some questions about glue: What does everyone use for laminating tops, joining the body pieces, gluing fingerboard down and gluing the frets and nut.

    I've seen some use hide glue, gorilla glue, titebond.

    I went to the hardware store and was a bit overwhelmed with all the titebonds and gorilla glues. Do i need titebond, titebond2, gorilla glue carpenters, gorilla glue??? and then just some ca glue (or superglue) for the nut and frets (if needed).

    Sorry, like I said, my first build and id ont really want the glue to be the reason it falls apart. :) thanks
     
  2. whodatpat

    whodatpat Friend of Leo's

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    Dont apologize for being a newbie. Everyone is once.
    The professionals will have great recomendations. Mine is the opinion of a hack.
    Hide glue is a lot of work and expense for an amature. I would certainly ise it to set acoustic necks, but on everything else I like plane old Titebond.
    Titebond 2 is ONE MORE, so it has to be better being that its waterproof. But I still stick with the original that is proven to work on everything but boat oars.
    Gorilla Glue is useless. It swells up pushing the boards appart amd I find it to be verry brittle. It is a prety good tacking glue like a hot glue gun without the speed. But I dont like it at all.

    Patrick Votes Titebond 1
     
  3. Tele-Monster

    Tele-Monster Friend of Leo's

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    You mean other than the two I know?

    The kind you eat
    The kind you sniff
     
  4. guitar2005

    guitar2005 Tele-Holic

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    Titebond 1 or any yellow wood glue is best.
     
  5. roflcopter

    roflcopter TDPRI Member

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    Thanks a bunch.

    I was kinda planning on going with the original titebond as thats what I remember seeing in a number of threads.

    I know titebond makes a liquid hide glue, would it be beneficial for me to use that for say the fingerboard so I could remove it with a hot knife if I have problems with the truss rod or something, or should I just not worry about that.
     
  6. Rob52

    Rob52 Tele-Holic

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    Nothing wrong with plain old Titebond for wood where electric guitars are concerned.
     
  7. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Regular old Titebond (I, but it doesn't say that, it has a red label) is the best bet for almost any woodworking project in my house - especially for guitars. Titebond II is more water resistant but it's quite a bit more runny. In fact, I see no use for Titebond II even for outdoor projects because now they have Titebond III which is supposed to withstand boiling in water. But again, the consistency of III is different and I prefer good ole red-label Titebond. Don't even get me started on the thick brown "moulding" glue they have.

    Bindings are a different story - lots of threads here on it but most people either use plastic model cement or Weld-on or Duco or CA glue. It's nice to have thin and medium CA glue on hand for drop fills and small repairs.

    I also reach for a hot glue gun sometimes for temporary fixtures. For instance if you want to glue a nut or saddle blank to a scrap handle for roughing out on the bandsaw or the stationary belt sander or to hold a sacrificial wood fence on the vise jaws.

    And as for the premixed hide glue from Franklin, stay away because it's probably stale even before you get it home. They add a bunch of urea, IRRC, in order to retard it so it stays liquid at room temperature in the bottle for shipping. I paid for a neck reset and they used that stuff and had to do it all over because the joint crept.

    Don't be afraid of real hide glue, though - with a little practice on how much to mix by weight you'll have your own favorite handling recipe in no time. I use an electric kettle as a water bath, with tiny glass half-pint mason jar for the glue, sitting suspended in the water on a piece of plastic cut from the bottom of a mixing cup, and a small dial thermometer. However it's a lot of bother and you may find it's really only necessary for hammer-veneering or for pieces that you expect to have to redo some day, like rosewood bridges or neck dovetails on an acoustic. It would probably be a good idea for fingerboards because when it crystallizes it won't creep, but you'd have to warm up the workpieces first and work quickly to get things registered and clamped up. When I try my first slab-board, I'll be tempted to get out the hide glue. Oh, and in the back of my mind I'm reminded of the Les Paul build thread here where Preeb concluded his unmentionable GI symptoms came from exposure to something that incubated in his glue pot, so try to keep the glue batch fresh.

    So, okay, yeah that's my version of the short answer: Titebond (maybe they should make a special version for luthery called "Titebond XI").
     
  8. davmac

    davmac Tele-Afflicted

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    When I started out making my first guitar, ooooh all of three weeks ago, the advice I got from a professional luthier was to use Titebond Original for the wood/wood joins.

    [​IMG]

    I used it for a set neck and it is still in one piece (so far).

    [​IMG]
     
  9. roflcopter

    roflcopter TDPRI Member

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    thanks everybody. this is very comforting because i was starting to worry id use the wrong glue for the wrong application, blah blah... now if only that damn lumber would show up!
     
  10. mlp-mx6

    mlp-mx6 Tele-Holic

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    Titebond II is a terrible choice for woodworking, as it allows a lot of creep. If you're going to use a Titebond, the red label is the only one to choose.

    Hide glue is also a good choice, but it comes with its own learning curve.
     
  11. axedaddy

    axedaddy Tele-Afflicted

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    I have had good luck with Gorilla white wood glue, it sets strong and dries clear. Luthiers Mercantile white instrument glues is a good choice as well. Plain old red label titebond is standard.
     
  12. mcgeorgerl

    mcgeorgerl Tele-Meister

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    Plain ol' Tightbond.

    I use III for dark woods like walnut and sapele.

    Skip the bottled hide glue. There's just no real advantage in my opinion.

    Flake hide glue is different. Wonderful stuff but it's a pain. I don't use it in the winter since the basement is too cool. Even in the summertime I like to work under a heat lamp or two. I don't see any advantages for solid body instruments.

    Been reading about some acoustic builders who claim they don't like the added moisture of AR glues when they attach fingerboards and swear by epoxy.

    Siminoff likes Weldwood plastic resin glue for some stuff. I've tried it but I don't see any advantage. My unofficial destructive testing showed it was no stronger than Tightbond I and it leaves a noticable, darker line on light wood. Plus you mix it with water so you always seem to whip up more than you need. It ain't cheap and it has a short shelf life.

    Stick with good old Tightbond. I buy mine at the wood stores 'cause I think it's fresher. I don't know how to read their code dates.
     
  13. mcgeorgerl

    mcgeorgerl Tele-Meister

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    Oh, and if you can hate a glue... I HATE the polyurethane glues. Never again.
     
  14. Scatter Lee

    Scatter Lee Friend of Leo's

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    Titebond is good glue but a year from now you will see and feel the glue joints, the stuff seems to swell out of the joints. I've glued up body blanks and had them sit around for a year and could see where the joints moved. Now i use Hide glue and love the stuff, nothing hard about it, you have to heat it up for half an hour but you can work the wood after a few hours

    this "glue pot" cost me $9.00 at walmart, low setting holds to 145 degrees

    [​IMG]

    I glued everything on this guitar with Hide glue, body, neck, fretboard, dots, and nut

    [​IMG]
     
  15. joe desperado

    joe desperado Tele-Meister

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    I find this an interesting topic and surprise ( but not) how opinions vary. While I have and do use Hide glue for Violin repairs and some vintage guitar repairs (archtops mostly)...I find titebond an excellent choice for electric guitars. Especially gluing the seems and fingerboards. I have not had any issues seeing or feeling a seem glued with Titebond. I do not find "creep" an issue with titebond and build with 99% of the time. The other 1% of the time is a split between white glue (like LMI) and hide glue. I believe that Scattter Lee probably has good jointing techniques, but i think the majority of issues seen with titebond is due to poor techniques etc.

    Yes...I understand that glues like titebond have a fundamental difference than hide glue, but I dont believe its as horrible as purist make it out to be either.


    Anyway..use what is easiest to use until your proficient at the other tasks and building instruments that will be scrutinized to that level of detail.
     
  16. Mojotron

    Mojotron Poster Extraordinaire

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    Hmmm - IMO that really sums up a good approach to guitar making in general. I've found that there are a lot of little things that people talk about as if they were a big deal - but unless it is for you... it's most likely not. I get rather religious about things that others think are silly... I think everyone does that. As far as glue - I started out using Gorilla glue so what do I know. :lol::lol: :oops: I did find that Original Titebond is easier to get off your hands :oops::oops: and it works for just about everything on a guitar that CA glue does not handle.

    BTW - when it comes to gluing frets and plastics to wood.. This stuff rocks!
    [​IMG]
     
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