Glass 1, Sink 0

Phrygian77

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It isn't like you have to take that sink out in one piece.
Get on it.
YEP!!!

LOL!!! Yep! By the looks of it, P is 1/2 way there already! Easy Peazey! :)

Don't want to mess up that granite though.

PXL_20220102_223807110.jpg



Not sure if this is standard practice, but it looks jerry-built to me.
 

Telekarster

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Not sure if this is standard practice, but it looks jerry-built to me.

Yep... actually that's pretty much what I remember seeing. Well, these days I'm more inclinded to pay someone to do this sort of work for me. Sometimes it pays to get a pro ;) It's really not a hard fix though IMO. Replacement sink should be had via about any big box HW store. Good luck mate in whatever road you choose!
 

WalthamMoosical

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Wow, sorry about that sink. Sometimes I regret having gotten a stainless-steel sink, but this morning isn't one of them. (And besides, it wasn't the sink I was worried about, but rather the glass glasses that I knew I would occasionally drop in there. I guess there was a third possibility that I had not even counted upon ...)

And as someone else suggested, maybe the cooler just needs a reboot. Similar thing happened with my dad's fridge a couple months ago. It just needed a time out.
 

nvilletele

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Have you been playing or singing "Born Under a Bad Sign" lately?

"If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all."
 

TomBrokaw

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Give 'em the beans!
I always like to get the bad stuff for the year out of the way in January, too.

Hope it all gets better from here!

That fridge is what pi55e5 me off. The quality of new appliances makes my blood boil. I was an appliance repair man for a number of years (still am in some ways) and it's just stunning to me what kind of junk the manufacturers are churning out these days.
Same. Our fridge blew a fuse a couple of years ago, which should have been an easy fix, except that it was soldered directly to the logic board. The logic board was kind of hard to find (fridge was about 4 years old by then), about $250, and three weeks to deliver.

I replaced the fuse and added a fuse holder so if it ever blows in the future, it'll take me more time to remove and replace the dust shield than to fix the actual problem. I can't imagine that they saved more than 5c in materials and 10 seconds in manufacturing time to solder the fuse directly to the board instead of a couple of clips, but they obviously felt it was worth it.

@OP: We love our stainless sink. Easy to clean, doesn't break. Might dent, might scratch, but hasn't yet.
 

3fngrs

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Like they said back in the day, a $300 TV tube will save a 10 cent fist by blowing first. Ain't life grand!
 

Red Ryder

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The sink is definitely epoxied that's how they do under mounts with granite. I have the same situation a glass candleholder fell in the sink, the sink broke, candleholder survived. My sink is a top mount. However being a tile and stone mason I made sure my sink was solidly mounted. Hammer time.
 

getbent

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The sink is definitely epoxied that's how they do under mounts with granite. I have the same situation a glass candleholder fell in the sink, the sink broke, candleholder survived. My sink is a top mount. However being a tile and stone mason I made sure my sink was solidly mounted. Hammer time.

I have undersink, no epoxy.
 

telemnemonics

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Not a great start to the new year.

View attachment 936322

View attachment 936323


My woman woke me up yesterday, crying, and said, "I need to talk to you about something." She apparently had dropped a glass in sink. The glass survived. I can only hope that the sink isn't epoxied to the granite.

Later, I walked out to the refrigerator in the garage to grab a soda, and I immediately realized something was wrong. It's brand new, just delivered less than two weeks ago.

View attachment 936330

Might be an optical illusion but this pic of the top has a shadow on the right that looks like it's a top mount?
Then the pic from below of the clip looks like a bottom mount?
Either way, was it a professional install or a home hobby job?
Drilling granite is typical and I've only broken one granite counter top drilling to secure a dishwasher. OOPS!
Put in a lot of kitchens but haven't seen every method and granite was usually done by granite contractors.
The granite may not (or will not!) come out whole but the sink sure should.
I'd agree with disconnect pipes and clips then give it some wiggles.
If it doesn't move, take a putty knife and dig into the seam to feel if it's a soft or hard sealant/ adhesive.
If soft, slice all the way around then lightly pry, over and over until it lets go.
I just can't tell what the install is.
Flexible sealants hold pretty rigid until you worry them loose.

BTW, when she woke you up, was it a good talk?

I just had a less than wonderful talk about replacing the surprise newly broken washing machine while shopping for new tires.
Also wringing and bailing.
 

telemnemonics

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I enlarged the top view on my ipad and see it's under mount.
I'd try a working a thin putty knife around the seam or even a utility knife.
Maybe procure a new basin first though?
 

JL_LI

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The refrigerator is like a Squier with a crack in the finish. Send it back. The crack in the sink is real. It goes through. It's not just a surface crack. That's some bad luck. Get some clear optical epoxy. Mix in a tiny bit of plaster. It should hide the surface crack. Use a single edge blade to apply it and a clean blade to scrape it after it cures. Get some bondo epoxy body putty and overfill the crack and divot from the bottom. With luck, you'll have forestalled disaster until renovation time. My wife did the exact same thing in our upstairs bathroom sink. The sink was almond color. I sifted a bit of almond grout to use in place of plaster and did exactly what I recommended in this post. It wasn't perfect, but it lasted four or five years until we did our top to bottom renovation in 2021.
 

aging_rocker

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S**t like this always happens at this time of year. Does to me, anyway. I always give the whiteware stern looks over Christmas/NY - 'don't you even think about it...'

One Christmas day when the kids were little we switched on the stove to start dinner and the fecker blew up!

This Christmas, the water main junction just outside the kitchen decided to die at dusk on Christmas Eve, we just filled some water containers and turned the water off.

So I spent my Christmas morning digging a hole to locate the problem, while simultaneously fending off Mrs R's constant 'can you fix it?, can you fix it?' mantra. She was incredibly inventive with the cursing of the old plumbing, whoever installed it, the universe in general, and me of course.

A friends son who is a plumber sorted us out with a repair the next day, thankfully. He didn't want to take any payment, but I forced him to. I mean, what would another plumber have charged for a Christmas/Boxing day call out?
 

Chuckster

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I'm a licensed master plumber... That sink is a goner. Cracked vitreous sinks are dangerous.

That sink is mounted correctly with grind-outs and inserts. It is almost certainly sealed to the underside of the granite with clear or white silicone.

I typically break that bead with a thin sharp putty knife. If they used an adhesive caulk (most counter guys won't), then the scraper blade in an oscillating multi-tool is the way to go.

Just loosen the insert nuts a 1/4" before starting. Good luck!
 
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