Gibson spaced hardtail bridge.

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by old_picker, May 15, 2021.

  1. old_picker

    old_picker Tele-Afflicted

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    Does such a thing exist ?
    50mm or 1.96" string spacing at the saddles.

    I have one of the Stewmac top loaders but not overly happy with the quality. I've used Schaller 3d6 which is great quality but too many moving parts eg strings tend to wander on the roller saddles.

    Ideally I'd like a steel base plate with either steel or zinc alloy saddles.

    I like to design guitars with screw down necks and zero neck angle. The bridge designs for fender style guitars are widely available but alas not with narrow string spacing.

    Any tips on another bridge apart from the two afforementioned greatly appreciated.
     
  2. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Schaller
    [​IMG]
    You can adjust the rollers for whatever string spacing you want. The big screw locks the saddles.
     
  3. old_picker

    old_picker Tele-Afflicted

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    As I pointed out in my post I have used maybe 7 or 8 of the 3d6 bridges. Yes the saddle lock screw locked the saddles in position left to right but the rollers are still able to move as you can see in the photo. There is now way to lock the rollers in position. A drop of superglue on the saddle roller screw solves that issue. To me it is not a particularly elegant solution. Contact with a hot soldering iron quickly zaps the superglue in theory but I dont know how good that works in theory

    The new model has dispensed with the saddle lock screw as it was an unnecessary complication. The new straight sided bottom edge of the bridge plate makes the lock screw redundant and saddles sit in a straight line nicely.
     
  4. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Poster Extraordinaire

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    That would be “vintage style” Gibson spacing. “New” Gibson spacing (since at least the ‘80s, and maybe earlier) is actually fairly wide.

    Set your spacing on a Schaller, and then place a drop of your preferred strength of Loctite where each saddle meets its thread. Nothing inelegant about using a basic mechanical supply as it was designed to be used.
     
  5. highwaycat

    highwaycat Tele-Holic

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    Could you file notches in the saddles?
     
  6. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Recess slightly whatever ‘Gibson’ type one-piece you like. I prefer a one-piece with no moving parts for tonal reasons. Second best is an ABR-1 type. The ABR type has an advantage in that it can be radiused to match the fretboard radius. Roller bridges cannot be radiused....or at least to do so requires some very precise machining. I have the GP that’d entails exactly how much four of the rollers need to be machined in order to take that Schaller from a 15” to a 12” radius. I ran across this problem when setting up the Fender Robben Ford maybe 27 years ago. That guitar in the early years had that Schaller bridge. Rollers also suck tone and sustain. imho, the Gibson ‘lightning bolt’ bridge which gave rise to the PRS bridge yields the best sustain and a tonal quality I like.
     
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