Getting Old vs. Being Old

Recce

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The trick is just to be grateful that you’re alive, and to realize that the capabilities you have are a blessing. Age has no meaning other than the meaning you give it.
I went out fishing in my bass boat for five hours today. The sun was beating down and we got off the water when it got up to ninety degrees. Twenty years ago that would not have been a big deal. In my sixties it took a lot more out of me. I can’t do everything I once could at the same intensity.
 

Toto'sDad

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I went out fishing in my bass boat for five hours today. The sun was beating down and we got off the water when it got up to ninety degrees. Twenty years ago that would not have been a big deal. In my sixties it took a lot more out of me. I can’t do everything I once could at the same intensity.

Every once in a while on these long hot summer days, the gang I play golf with once a month will want to play another 18 holes. Even with riding in a cart, there is still a lot of movement. When it's a hundred plus when we get through with playing two rounds back to back, I feel like I need to check in at the emergency clinic.
 

Telekarster

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Every once in a while on these long hot summer days, the gang I play golf with once a month will want to play another 18 holes. Even with riding in a cart, there is still a lot of movement. When it's a hundred plus when we get through with playing two rounds back to back, I feel like I need to check in at the emergency clinic.

Yep... especially when you're standing there waiting to put out ;) Get's darn hot on those greens when it's 90+ and no wind! I used to drink beer the whole time, and the temps never bothered me much... today it's gallons of water and as much shade as I can get! LOL!!
 

raysachs

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I look in the mirror and I do not recognize this guy lol.
I am blessed I do not look my age nor does my wife. No meds for both of us....
But my knees do limit what I can do .
Keto is the secret.....stay away from the sugar.....it's evil!
I recognize the guy in the mirror - he used to be my Dad. I’ve missed him for a long time. Now it’s sort of nice but confusing to get reacquainted with him!

Keto did it for me too. I was 165-170 in peak condition in my 30s and 40s. I’d drifted up to 215, but Keto got me back down to 170. I’m not Keto anymore, for about a year and a half actually, but I’m still MUCH lower carb than I used to be, but almost no sweets, no really sugary fruits. But I’ll eat a sandwich at lunch with no regrets, occasionally a carby side dish at dinner, and I’m still at 170. I needed Keto to LOSE the weight, but I don’t seem to need to stay full-Keto to keep it off.

-Ray
 

Skyhook

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In a couple of months I turn 48. Whether you consider that 'old' or not likely depends on which side of that line you stand.

When I was in my teens, I used to think 25 was 'old'. Specifically, "when women got fat and ugly". Boy was I stupid and wrong. Ye gawds.

When I was in my 20s, I thought that 40 was 'old'. I'd seen all the "Lordy Lordy, <name> is Forty" cakes among people who were twice my life away in age. I understood that by time you're in your 40s, you're all broken down and decrepit. 'Old' people talk about aches and pains, being tired, and there are endless cartoons about 'old people' and their decline.

When I was in my 30s, I felt like I was in my second 20s. I was dating women in their 20s, and I didn't feel a lick older than 23.

On my 40th birthday, I was overcome with a feeling of dread. I felt as if "it was all over" and that from this point on I would decline into decrepitation and nothing would be easy, fun, or painless anymore. I've stopped dating (various reasons), but it seems like I'm wrong again.

Maybe I've never outgrown the stupidity of youth. I spring out of chairs no differently than I did when I was 14, I bounce back from binge drinking like I was 20 and I seem to have more energy than my peers. I'm a bit overweight and definitely out of shape, but I feel like I could be twice as fat and half as capable, given my lifestyle choices. I truly feel I could (with motivation) get back to the shape and condition I was 10 or 15 years ago, if i put in the effort.

My best guess is that most people on TDPRI are either around my age or older. I've seen a lot of posts about health woes and problems. I'm only mildly overweight, I am on blood pressure meds, and I'm greying, thinning, and ugly as hell, but I'm otherwise fairly unfazed by age.

I know that all this can turn on a dime, but am I lucky somehow to not feel 'old' at almost 50, or am I (yet again) wrong about what 'old' means?
I've read somewhere(teh internets) that "Inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened".
 

tfarny

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Honestly I felt the same as the OP, I was snowboarding in my late 40s and having a blast. Didn't feel 100% as spry as in my 20s, but hey what can you do.

I started "feeling old" just in the last couple of years physically - I'm 50 now. C&%*^(-19 was very hard on me and I don't feel quite the same as before having it - I get tired more quickly, more often, I move slower. I'm working my way back to a healthier place but it is taking longer and more effort than when I was younger. I wouldn't have said all of this just a few years ago. Feels like a sudden change in me and not a good one.

In terms of attitude about the world though I make a conscious effort to avoid "get off my lawn" attitudes as I can. Working with young people all the time helps a lot with that.
 

Tim S

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For me, the tipping point was 50. After crossing 50, I had to get two dental implants, got tennis elbow tendon damage, cataract surgery on both eyes (thanks to a side-effect of Flonase), double-hernia surgery, detected high blood pressure and a diagnosis of osteoarthritis in my hands — all before hitting 55.

When a series of medical conditions that “old people get” happen to you, it’s nature’s way of saying “Your turn!”
 

MarkieMark

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I know that all this can turn on a dime, but am I lucky somehow to not feel 'old' at almost 50, or am I (yet again) wrong about what 'old' means?

My answer:
You are wrong. And with any luck will have the time to find out just how wrong. ;)
Your still young enough to have time to get over it...

And take the "it's all in your mind" responses for what they are worth.
Unless you know a way to telepathically get up the stairs at the end of the day. Or use your imagination to get your socks on. Etc.
 

Spox

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The lockdowns badly affected my overall health. Prior to those I had a set target of forty miles a week for walking, I was then told to stay in because of my asthma and my walks dropped to two miles a week and I went up a waist size. Then my back seized up bigtime leaving me completely housebound last year. I've gone from a low in the second half of 2019 of under ten stone to hovering between twelve and a half and thirteen stone. I'll probably never get back to where I was but I want to get down to about eleven, eleven and a half stone. I walked twenty three miles last week, summer hasn't really kicked in here yet, wind, rain, clouds. I am in pretty much constant pain and was trying to walk through this but now I have lost some of the motivation. I feel tired all of the time, the last two years feel like twenty.

I saw three of my closest friends in the space of a week. On the Sunday I went to visit one, he's a career drinker and chain toker and a grafter who works all week and drinks all of the non work time. I am just enjoying his company whilst I still can. On Saturday I went to visit another friend, also works long hours and via my nagging/gentle supportive persuasion has cut his drinking from three or four nights a week to one and wants to cut that down too. He stopped toking years ago and cut his smoking down of his own accord. Re the drinking, I went to visit him a few years aback and he had taken an epileptic fit whilst drunk and split his head open in the fall in his kitchen, I wasn't just suggesting that he drink less for the obvious benefits. On my way to visit him I had a chance meeting with another friend who lives a street away from him, she'd lost her car keys and I helped her try to find them, unsuccessfully. Like myself she'd quit drinking altogether as it was a real problem, she also doesn't smoke and is the captain of a womans football team despite being fifty three or fifty four and is really fit, cycling etc. I walked her along the road for a bit, she was on her way to walk around a large park which she does every evening. If I was to suggest a walk around the park to the other two they would, and do, tell me to hold back with the crazy talk, basically, whereas the female friend we sometimes do go for walks in the park and both of us would welcome the suggestion, it's a platonic friendship, guys aren't her thing. All four of us are over fifty and under fifty five. It is difficult to properly explain the difference between the four of us.

Yesterday I had a chance meeting with someone who was a close friend, it was the first time I had seen him in a decade. We happily caught up, his eldest is my goddaughter. He was somoking a cigarette and had a bad hangover from the weekend but looked fit, he was in his work van, he's a selfemployed landscape gardener and was laughing at the fact that we made it this far after doing our best in our teens and twenties to make that highly improbable if not impossible. We were congratulating each other on at least looking fit. It is what it is, I suppose.
 

Mechanic

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I just turned 70, no drinker or smoker most of my adult life. I didn’t worry about diet or exercise. I get my fruits and veggies as I like them but never shied away from a steak or fried chicken, fresh salmon or trout were always welcomed.
As for exercise, I couldn’t run to save my ass, but give me my mountain bike I had and still have a lot of fun.
My job was public transit, bus and light and commuter rail. The health geeks at work would do a check up and forced us to wear a pedometer every day either super visors checking them. They finally chose to ignore the maintenance side but consentrated on operators and managers. I was a fit 210 on a 6’4” frame.
5 years ago I came down with NASH which is fatty liver disease that required a transplant. It’s a muscle waisting disease. I’m now on the Mediterranean diet that keeps me going.
I ride my bike and walk, just not as much or as hard as I could before. I work/ play in my shop rebuilding old Volkswagens. Cast and reload for my guns and play a lot of guitar.
I’m currently wiegh about 165 lbs and tire easily as my abbs are screwed from the surgery. But I’m alive and still keep on kicking it.
Youth is waisted on youth.
 

telemnemonics

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For me, the tipping point was 50. After crossing 50, I had to get two dental implants, got tennis elbow tendon damage, cataract surgery on both eyes (thanks to a side-effect of Flonase), double-hernia surgery, detected high blood pressure and a diagnosis of osteoarthritis in my hands — all before hitting 55.

When a series of medical conditions that “old people get” happen to you, it’s nature’s way of saying “Your turn!”
"Side effects of Flonase"??????

Noooooooooooooo!
Ive used it daily for some years and its luxy to not be crushed by the inch deep layers of pollen on everything during the season.
Eyes are important too though, my doc never mentioned any risks when suggesting Flonase and I got warned about my other meds for chronic pain: Tylenol and Aleve formerly Advil, well known risks but gettin old after too much fun is something we hafta pay for!
 

cometazzi

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"Side effects of Flonase"??????

Noooooooooooooo!
Ive used it daily for some years and its luxy to not be crushed by the inch deep layers of pollen on everything during the season.
Eyes are important too though, my doc never mentioned any risks when suggesting Flonase and I got warned about my other meds for chronic pain: Tylenol and Aleve formerly Advil, well known risks but gettin old after too much fun is something we hafta pay for!

The blood pressure meds I've been on for the last decade or so (lisinopril-HCZ) causes sun sensitivity in me. I'm pretty good at staying out of sunlight (I can feel it burning me as it happens) but I recently discovered that it also means proclivity towards cataracts.

I *always* wear sunglasses when I go outside, but I do see a little bit of 'haze' around bright objects in a dark room. Definitely going to ask about it on my next eye exam (which is overdue by about 3 years now).

Some of that could be 'normal' for someone my age. Some of it could just be me making a mountain out of a molehill.
 

LGOberean

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In a couple of months I turn 48. Whether you consider that 'old' or not likely depends on which side of that line you stand.

When I was in my teens, I used to think 25 was 'old'. Specifically, "when women got fat and ugly". Boy was I stupid and wrong. Ye gawds.

When I was in my 20s, I thought that 40 was 'old'. I'd seen all the "Lordy Lordy, <name> is Forty" cakes among people who were twice my life away in age. I understood that by time you're in your 40s, you're all broken down and decrepit. 'Old' people talk about aches and pains, being tired, and there are endless cartoons about 'old people' and their decline.

When I was in my 30s, I felt like I was in my second 20s. I was dating women in their 20s, and I didn't feel a lick older than 23.

On my 40th birthday, I was overcome with a feeling of dread. I felt as if "it was all over" and that from this point on I would decline into decrepitation and nothing would be easy, fun, or painless anymore. I've stopped dating (various reasons), but it seems like I'm wrong again.

Maybe I've never outgrown the stupidity of youth. I spring out of chairs no differently than I did when I was 14, I bounce back from binge drinking like I was 20 and I seem to have more energy than my peers. I'm a bit overweight and definitely out of shape, but I feel like I could be twice as fat and half as capable, given my lifestyle choices. I truly feel I could (with motivation) get back to the shape and condition I was 10 or 15 years ago, if i put in the effort.

My best guess is that most people on TDPRI are either around my age or older. I've seen a lot of posts about health woes and problems. I'm only mildly overweight, I am on blood pressure meds, and I'm greying, thinning, and ugly as hell, but I'm otherwise fairly unfazed by age.

I know that all this can turn on a dime, but am I lucky somehow to not feel 'old' at almost 50, or am I (yet again) wrong about what 'old' means?

To a degree, this issue is a matter of perspective.

Some days are better than others, and our perspective based on how we feel is perceived as "old(er)" or "young(er)." This morning I woke up stiff (not in a good way), and so I "felt" older than my chronological years.

Then there's the generational perspectives to consider. For example @cometazzi you are just slightly younger than my firstborn, so to me, you're a youngster. OTOH, I volunteer weekly at a retirement community, and many of the residents there are octogenarians or nonagenarians. To them, I am considered a youngster.

But I'm on the downhill slide towards 69 years of age. To put that another way, I have lived nearly 70% of a century. So while seniors in their 80s & 90s may consider me relatively young, I think even they would admit that calling me "young" must be qualified with the adverb "relatively."

So, the various perspectives of people from different age brackets notwithstanding, at a certain point in the lifespan of a human being, you qualify as being old. Not necessarily oldest, but definitely old. There are certain benchmarks in life that you just can't reach unless you come to the point of measuring your life, not in years or even decades, but in scores.

And I think I can I can make a case for my having arrived. Like I said, i have lived almost seven tenths of a century. I'm less than a year away from celebrating my 50th wedding anniversary. All of my children are in their 40s, and I have 19 grandchildren, 10 of which are adults, and one is married. Great-grandparenthood is just around the corner. If that isn't old, it'll do until old comes along.
 

Toto'sDad

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When I was around 69 years old, my son came by one day. He looked pretty somber, so I asked him what was up? He said he had just come from the funeral of a co-worker that he had worked with a number of years in the Hazardous Material Remediation industry. He said, I'm probably next. I told him not to worry, he was a whole different person. His words proved to be prophetic, he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in less than a year. He is gone now, and I miss him each and every day. If you think you are old, losing a son or daughter, will add a whole new dimension to being old.
 

LGOberean

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When I was around 69 years old, my son came by one day. He looked pretty somber, so I asked him what was up? He said he had just come from the funeral of a co-worker that he had worked with a number of years in the Hazardous Material Remediation industry. He said, I'm probably next. I told him not to worry, he was a whole different person. His words proved to be prophetic, he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in less than a year. He is gone now, and I miss him each and every day. If you think you are old, losing a son or daughter, will add a whole new dimension to being old.

I haven't lost a child, and seriously hope to avoid experiencing that kind of pain. The closest I can come to that feeling is the loss of my younger brother Buddy last September. He was six years and change younger than me. My mother was still 89 at the time. She went through (and probably still feels like) "I'm old! It should've been me!" Statistically speaking, I could say it should've been me. I'm older, and although I've turned around a lot of my heath issues, I am a diabetic that's had a quadruple bypass surgery.
 

lowatter

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