Getting a smooth finish with poplar and Dupli-Color

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Hi all, I'm looking to use Dupli-Color Perfect Finish primer, paint, and clear for a poplar body. What is recommended for prepping poplar (sealer, etc.) and how can I avoid the grain showing through?
 

DrASATele

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Excellent prep. That's how. Sand all the way up to 320. Use a damp (not soaked) rag to wipe the body down and raise the grain. Re-sand (scuff really) body to 320, wipe body with damp rag again feel the surface, find any rough spots where the grain has risen again and re-scuff 320. Then sealer followed by another 320 sanding/scuffing. I've used shellac as a sealer for Duplicolor in the past but since you are looking to completely wipe out the grain, I'd say use Duplicolor primer too.
 

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Excellent prep. That's how. Sand all the way up to 320. Use a damp (not soaked) rag to wipe the body down and raise the grain. Re-sand (scuff really) body to 320, wipe body with damp rag again feel the surface, find any rough spots where the grain has risen again and re-scuff 320. Then sealer followed by another 320 sanding/scuffing. I've used shellac as a sealer for Duplicolor in the past but since you are looking to completely wipe out the grain, I'd say use Duplicolor primer too.
I was thinking about shellac, what brand would you reccomend, and how effective is it compared to actual sealer?
 

stratisfied

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Don't go mixing up different paint systems. I never use shellac for anything besides sealing drywall repairs. In my experience , it doesn't spray out smoothly and doesn't sand well as it tends to remain clingy and soft. If you sand through it, good luck getting rid of the resulting edges.

Start with an opaque high-build primer like Duplicolor Primer-Filler. It is a high solids/fast build sealer/primer that fills minor imperfections like your tight wood grain. If your body was ash, walnut or mahogany, yes you would benefit from grain fill first because of the prominent grain texture, though the primer/filler makes quick work of the grain also and a few extra coats are easier than doing the grain fill and sanding as yopu sometimes wind up having to do multiple fills anyway. With alder, poplar or maple, grain filling isn't needed. The primer does that work. Apply multiple coats and sand between coats until you have a surface like matte glass after wet-sanding the final primer coat. Then follow up with your color and clear topcoats.
 

DrASATele

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I like the Zinsser Seal Coat or the Zinsser Clear rattle can. Both are wax free and make good quality sealers. I haven't had the issues that Stratisfied has. I have used it under duplicolor and regular lacquers as well as True Oil and Polyurethanes. The key is to make sure it's new, not sitting on your shelf for 5 years. If you make your own shellac that's even better.
I don't know that it is any better than your standard sanding sealers. I like it for accessibility, I don't have to wait for UPS/FedRex or the next delivery 2 Sherwin William's I can go to HD or Lowes and get going. Also as long as it's fully dry per the instructions it's compatible as a sealer with most top coat finishes.
 

stratisfied

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The key is to make sure it's new, not sitting on your shelf for 5 years.
That's the issue right there and why I avoid using it. I also liken it to a body and fender work since you are using automotive finishes. You won't find a body shop that uses shellac as an undercoat or primer for an automotive finish top coat.
 

Beebe

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I was thinking about shellac, what brand would you reccomend, and how effective is it compared to actual sealer?

Do whatever filling and sealing required to have the surface looking super flat and pretty much ready to polish before applying color.

And dhellac is excellent for sealing. I mix my own dewaxed shellac, as shelf life can cause issues with premixed stuff. I order from


and I mix it at a ratio of 3g dewaxed Shellac to 16 oz 190 Proof Everclear for about a 1.5 pound cut. Just divide for a smaller batch. You can brush it on for sealing. It soaks in nicely and dries fast.

I put the shellac flakes in a coffee grinder dedicated for that purpose. Shake up the powder with the alcohol, and if you keep shaking it'll be ready to use in 10 or 15 minuets.

You probably only need a couple oz of the solution for a couple of coats.

I think that some products sold as sealer might have clear pigments of different sizes in them that help fill and level the surface.
 

pippoman

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Excellent prep. That's how. Sand all the way up to 320. Use a damp (not soaked) rag to wipe the body down and raise the grain. Re-sand (scuff really) body to 320, wipe body with damp rag again feel the surface, find any rough spots where the grain has risen again and re-scuff 320. Then sealer followed by another 320 sanding/scuffing. I've used shellac as a sealer for Duplicolor in the past but since you are looking to completely wipe out the grain, I'd say use Duplicolor primer too.
DrASATele has obviously been there, done that on more than one occasion. I think it’s sensible advice for finishing wood in general. You may have other ideas, but they may not yield any better results, likely not as good.
 

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So I've seen a lot of recommendations to use sealer, particularly shellac - but provided I can't find any, what other sealer suggestions do you have?
 

Jim_in_PA

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As has been stated, it's all about the prep. What kind of "poplar" also matters...the "true poplar/aspen" type is more stringy and takes a lot more effort to seal, fill and make smooth for subsequent finishing. Tulip/Yellow poplar (a member of the magnolia family) is more like a typical close grained hardwood and easier to work to a smooth surface for sealing and subsequent finishing. In the end, it all comes down to "elbow grease".
 




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