George Harrison Tele with Twin Humbucker

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by mxmln, Dec 16, 2019.

  1. mxmln

    mxmln NEW MEMBER!

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    Hi guys, I'm new here but was browsing around the forum for a couple days now. I learned a lot already. You guys are great.

    At this point I'm an absolute greenhorn when it comes to building guitars but I'm very eager to give it a shot and put some serious time into it. I'd like to start with the Tele mentioned in the subject (and my profile pic) with a few modifications (I'd like it to have two humbuckers instead of the single coils).

    Of course I couldn't get my hands on any rosewood for the body but I got a really nice piece of walnut and think it will look awesome with the right finish. I don't think I'm ready to make a neck just yet, so I bought one.

    I'm currently debating if I should start the body simply manually (bandsaw, sanders, routers...) to get a feel for it or immediately jump on the CNC wagon, I do have some friends with CNC machines / shopbot gantries.

    I found a couple of great drawings but most of them are for the classics and not what I need. I found the drawing below, which is exactly what I needed. However, does anyone know of resources where I could get a technical drawing / plans with dimensions?

    Thanks in advance for any input and direction. Can't wait for this project to shape up!

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/twin-humbucker-plans-drawings.374686/
    https://www.tdpri.com/attachments/tele-with-hh-config-pdf.162012/
     
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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  3. RiversQC

    RiversQC Tele-Meister

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    Welcome, and good luck with your build!

    I'm not sure where to find more technical HH tele drawings. I usually use the main T Downs drawing, and your choice of bridge and pickguard will dictate where your humbucker routes should go.

    Since I am relatively new to woodworking, I started with a few test bodies first out of cheaper wood. My first few were pine and poplar and looked pretty good until I screwed them up! Learned a lot and have since refined my techniques enough to work on more expensive woods. One of those, incidentally, is a rosewood-looking body out of roasted ash if you're interested. Coming along pretty slowly since I have more projects than time :rolleyes:

    20191111_191347.jpg

    Figuring out how to do that middle strip was my main challenge in making this one (mine is actually pine I found in the right dimension, as I dont yet have a thickness sander/planer). Cheers.
     
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  4. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    This guitar was built using what I think of as the "standard" Tele drawing - the T. Downs one that many of us on the forum use.

    The only real deviation from T.D.'s original drawing is the pickup choice - I located the pole pieces of the humbuckers in the same approximate location as the pole pieces of the single coils in the original drawing.


    IMG_0915.JPG



    IMG_0914.JPG


    The humbuckers sound really good, in this guitar :).

    I opted to use Duncan/Lover SH55's which are an excellent choice if you're looking for real PAF tone. More sparkle and chime than some of the more overwound versions of the humbucker.

    I also opted for a little shorter neck scale than the standard Fender 25.5" scale - I went with a 25" scale which I think sweetens up the tone a little more.




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  5. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    As far as the choice between CNC and more traditional tools go - it's a personal choice :).

    You start at the same point A (raw materials) and end at the same point B (a fully machined body or neck), but the paths between points A and B are much different.

    Same end result, just a different way of getting there :).

    I use traditional hand-eye controlled and operated tools primarily because they are what I grew up with and made my living with, so I'm very comfortable using them.

    I do have a little bit of experience from the primitive early days of CNC (early 1970's) when I made up punch cards to control machine operation, and from the 1980's when I used AutoCad for drawing, but I don't think that old stuff translates anymore ;).


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  6. jfgesquire

    jfgesquire Tele-Holic

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  7. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    May I humbly suggest getting a copy of Melvyn Hiscock's book Make Your Own Electric Guitar and reading it a dozen times before you start. Read very carefully the sections on tools and safety. If you have little experience with wood working concentrate on getting them before you touch router to walnut. One nice thing is that Hiscock describes building three different guitars using the three classic neck joints - one of them is a telecaster clone. He also shows how to build the classic skunk stripe neck if you decide to take that on.

    The TDowns drawings are accurate and the price is right. The back of Hiscock's books has template drawings for making humbucker routing templates. Hiscock also covers wiring - you will want to choose the correct pots and caps for to match the pickups.

    My feelings about hand building vs machining is very simple. The whole idea of a tele is a simple slab guitar that could be made out of available materials by unskilled labor. Kids build them in my local high school shop class (and learn all about tools and safety). The hardest parts will be the finish, fretwork and doing the setup. A tele is certainly a good platform if you want to learn how to program and use a cnc router, but I ask myself why anyone would bother. (I need to clarify that I come from the metal fabrication industry where cnc's are a part of daily life. I've never had a desire to use one in my guitar building)
     
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  8. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    As everyone mentioned, do some testing on cheap wood first. If you're going hand built you'll want to try out your templates and make sure of your measurements etc.

    I personally have no desire to go CNC at this point as I only build 2 or 3 a year max and I really like the process of building by hand. In your case I think that hand built to start is a great learning experience and once that is under your belt then CNC away.

    I also use the T Downs drawing. For humbuckers you may want to use the 72 Thinline in the attached drawing as a reference and something to compare to.
     

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  9. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    Your logic in locating the pickups is rock solid . Fender single coils are located at nodal points for a reason as are the poles of Gibson humbuckers with the covers on . 25.5" scale to 25" scale will not move those points enough to really matter .
     
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  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Node_(physics)

    Nodal points change as you fret the neck. Also the frequency of the note changes the nodal points. I say put pickups anywhere you want them. Gibson put them all over the place. Some single pickup guitars had them in the middle between the neck and bridge.

    https://www.bluemtguitar.com/produc...2&utm_source=google&utm_medium=smart_campaign

    The rule of thumb is less treble near the neck...more trebley toward the bridge. Consider that you may have to get a wrench or screwdriver in the bridge and neck and that may influence the pickup's position.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_harmonic


    Cncing is fun. Do what creates the most fun as this is supposed to not be work.

    As always YMMV.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2019
  11. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks for the vote of confidence!!

    Even an old half-blind squirrel like me finds a nut every now and then ;).

    Actually, the neck pickup's pole pieces are located right at fret #24 on a 25" scale board.

    The bridge pickup's pole pieces are located 4-13/16" south of the neck's.

    I measured the pole spacing on my old Gibson R9's pickups, and they are 4-3/4" center to center.

    So, 1/16" more separation on my humbucker Tele, than on my Gibson L.P. I don't know if I broke any cardinal rules on pickup placement, but it doesn't sound like it :).

    All I can tell you, is that it sounds very good. Lots of tonal difference between the neck and bridge pickups, and all of it is good and very usable.

    Maybe somewhere in this talk of pickup placement there might be some info to help the OP with locating his pickups.
    Keep in mind that the way humbuckers are usually oriented is with the adjustable screws at the top on the neck pickup, and at the bottom on the bridge pickup to give the widest separation in tone.

    edit: like Marty mentioned - which ever way you go, enjoy the experience and have some fun while you're at it :)!!!


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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2019
  12. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    A simple way to locate the nodal points is to do a basic harmonic pick like the 5 th , 7th, 12th , 19th frets . It should be right over your poles for best results . On a Strat , there is a nodal point over each pickup . Some of these folks knew what they were doing when they designed their instruments . The extended fretboards of some models will not allow the neck pickup to be placed like this and they tend to have a certain sound on the neck pickup that reflects this placement .
     
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