Frustrated and stuck in second gear. Recommendations to learn next level guitar - getting from novice to advanced????

NC E30

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Probably threads on this already - but I can't find them.

I've been playing for 25 years - and I'm still stuck. I can play all the barre chords, know the Pentatonic scale, can play some licks over blues and rock tracks - but I can't get to the next level. I want to be able to improve and solo over Rock (Rockabilly), and basic Jazz stuff.

I have many books - and I've looked at many videos - so many teachers with the "best" method out there. I'm so confused. And I've taken lessons from different teachers who all think their method is the best.

I'm really frustrated and confused. I love the guitar - but I can't stand lessons playing tab licks over Royalty Free music.

In my opinion - the best way to learn would be to learn songs that allow the student to progress and learn methods over popular rock songs that demonstrate the method of the lesson. "Today we're going to practice soloing over the I IV VII progressing using this song..."

I'm just stuck - I don't mind working from a book, with backing tracks - in fact I think I'd prefer it.

Recommendations would be very appreciated. Thanks
Thank you to everyone who answered this! I feel like I'm in the same rut. Have a TruFire membership, but having trouble figuring out which classes to take to actually advance.

Will check out the Tim Lerch class, it sounds like a great recommendation.
 

teletail

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You need feedback which you won’t get from Truefire, books and YouTube videos. With Skype, you can study with anyo, anywhere in the world. Why would anyone limit themselves?

I would strongly recommend a few lessons with one of our own - Ment Morris - https://mentmorris.podia.com/. I’ve taken a few lessons from him and he’s really opened up my playing. I brought him a few songs I was working on and he showed me some concepts that really helped. A good guitarist, good teacher and a good guy. I will definitely continue working with him.
 

OmegaWoods

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I ran across Kieth Wyatt when we rented VHS lesson tapes in the music store in the 90s (still have some, some on DVD). Excellent instructor at GIT too. This one might keep you busy for a while. If not he has a bunch of stuff out there and I think on line lessons also.
Check it out.

Check out Keith Wyatt on Artistworks. https://artistworks.com/guitar-lessons-keith-wyatt

You watch their videos, then make videos of yourself and submit it TO THE TEACHER (Keith Wyatt, in this case) and the teacher provides you with feedback. A year's sub is the price of a decent pedal (and PLAYER25) will get you 25% off. If another teacher strikes your musical interest more closely, they have a bunch of them.

I also highly recommend TrueFire.com.

Or Tomo Fujita's online classes. Or Tim Pierce's Masterclass online.

Check out Chris Sherland's YouTube Channel and Patreon page also.

Also, JustinGuitar.com has lessons for free and lots of different levels.

Finally, find a local teacher.

A million ways to learn, just depends on your level of commitment, how much time you have and the shape of your pocketbook.

Good Luck!
 

burtonfan

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To the OP: I didn't read everyone's advice, I read your post and this is what came to mind.

You seem set on leading the guitar down YOUR path.

Try letting the guitar lead YOU down IT'S path.

Just a thought....
 

chris m.

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Check out Keith Wyatt on Artistworks. https://artistworks.com/guitar-lessons-keith-wyatt

You watch their videos, then make videos of yourself and submit it TO THE TEACHER (Keith Wyatt, in this case) and the teacher provides you with feedback. A year's sub is the price of a decent pedal (and PLAYER25) will get you 25% off. If another teacher strikes your musical interest more closely, they have a bunch of them.

I also highly recommend TrueFire.com.

Or Tomo Fujita's online classes. Or Tim Pierce's Masterclass online.

Check out Chris Sherland's YouTube Channel and Patreon page also.

Also, JustinGuitar.com has lessons for free and lots of different levels.

Finally, find a local teacher.

A million ways to learn, just depends on your level of commitment, how much time you have and the shape of your pocketbook.

Good Luck!
Tomo Fujita was one of John Mayer's instructors at Berklee. I suspect he helped John break out of the pentatonic box.

Watch a few free YouTube videos of Tomo. He offers some great things to work on, such as knowing major and minor triads on the G/B/E strings up and down the neck.

One really simple way to break the ice-jam is to commit to learning one small, new thing every week. It takes a surprising amount of work to get even a simple, small thing burned into your muscle memory. Over the course of a year having 52 little ideas added to your repertoire really adds up.

The thought of tackling something like getting fluent at playing over jazz standard changes gets to be almost too much to contemplate or embark on. But learning a lick we really like, or learning a few alternate chord fingerings...those are little nuggets that we can commit to doing and then actually do them.
 

'64 Tele

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I learned in the Dark Ages (late 1960's) when there was no internet.
I took a couple lessons and quickly figured out there was no local teacher that would teach what I was wanting to learn.
Having had several years of piano instruction by that point, I got a couple of books (Mel Bay guitar chords) and looked at the fingerboard like a piano keyboard (each fret was 1/2 step....like the piano).
After getting basics from self study books, I played along with records (the 12 inch vinyl types) and watched a lot of different guitar players in live settings (they used to be called "dances", and had live bands).
When I really advanced, was playing in a working (country) band, playing 3 or 4 sets a night, two nights a week, 50 weekends a year for 3 and a half years. It was sink or swim.
I'm aware there are a lot of great internet courses out there.....just not for me.
and yes.....I'm old
 

SRHmusic

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The one thing that helped me the most was paying attention to the chord changes in a song and figuring out how the melody or solo relate to the chords. (It's a general musical approach, not guitar specific, and seemingly ignored by a lot of teachers.)

Some basic theory is very helpful:
Harmonizing the major scale to know which chords are in a key.
Looking for V - I chord changes.
Looking for things like going to a minor sound briefly, and other song writing 'devices' like that.

Spend a couple minutes on this each time you work on a song and the lights will start to go on.

Also, it's very helpful to learn the triads everywhere on the neck. (It's easier than it sounds because there is a pattern to the intervals.)
(Edited for typos as usual! )


Edit2-
Bruce Emery's books are really good, too, especially vol 2 if you already know a bit of theory:
 
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JIMMY JAZZMAN

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I was where you're at. Spent much time and money on books, internet gobblely-gook,
friends, teacher. I swear, had one teacher, who wouldn't move on until you had it
note for friggin' note. A premonition happened, MAKE MISTAKES, it's okay, then
you will set yourself on an upward path, instead of leveling out to nowhere. It freed me
to new concepts and no more CAGE. Don't ever get down, there's someone today,
who's just starting out, and all guitar players should be willing to share. Back in the 60's,
there were all kind of bands here in Baltimore, do-whop, soul, British Invasion, classic rock
and all of them were eager to share. Not some, but all. Keep playing, and most of all, love
what you're doing. You will also meet many interesting folks along the way.
 

Timbresmith1

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Probably threads on this already - but I can't find them.

I've been playing for 25 years - and I'm still stuck. I can play all the barre chords, know the Pentatonic scale, can play some licks over blues and rock tracks - but I can't get to the next level. I want to be able to improve and solo over Rock (Rockabilly), and basic Jazz stuff.

I have many books - and I've looked at many videos - so many teachers with the "best" method out there. I'm so confused. And I've taken lessons from different teachers who all think their method is the best.

I'm really frustrated and confused. I love the guitar - but I can't stand lessons playing tab licks over Royalty Free music.

In my opinion - the best way to learn would be to learn songs that allow the student to progress and learn methods over popular rock songs that demonstrate the method of the lesson. "Today we're going to practice soloing over the I IV VII progressing using this song..."

I'm just stuck - I don't mind working from a book, with backing tracks - in fact I think I'd prefer it.

Recommendations would be very appreciated. Thanks
Put the guitar down for a minute. Start singing solos over changes.
Then start playing what you sing.
 

Toast

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Also, consider a study of major scales up and down the neck. The movement will force you to learn some passing tones and make life more interesting.
I'm still working my way through intermediate guitar concepts, but one epiphany I had along the way was to realize that I preferred playing the major scale. The time I spent early on messing around with pentatonic scale patterns would have been better spent focusing on full major and minor scale patterns.
 

Skyhook

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I've taken lessons from different teachers who all think their method is the best.
I took lessons to get my lead playing out of a rut.
After some years... exactly the same rut.
HOWEVER... my rhythm playing and the amount of chords I use had skyrocketed.
That has been far more useful to me than any widdly widdly I might have picked up.

Still trying to adopt new tricks though, but nowadays my rut has it's own bathroom, garage and area code.

Point is: Sometimes you get what you want but sometimes you get what you need.
 

klasaine

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I will add my (very experienced at this point) voice to the chorus of "get in a band". Any band!
All the books, lessons, videos, tutorials (including this forum) will not get you to the next level. You have to play with people and apply the few simple things you already know and make that stuff sound musical before you will be able to move forward.
Not to blow my own horn but I've been making a living with guitar in hand since about 1981 or 82. This includes some teaching. I know what I'm talking about.
 
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nickmm

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Improve your rhythm playing. Your lead playing will improve.
It's not the scales that are the problem most of the time.

ROBBEN FORD – RHYTHM BLUES is a good book
The Funkmasters-the Great James Brown Rhythm Sections
 

ndcaster

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I want to be able to improve and solo over Rock (Rockabilly), and basic Jazz stuff.
Cliff Gallup is mainly pentatonics and a position player

Setzer loves to rock that stuff, but he knows a lot more

to play more like Setzer (!), you need to know chord shapes all over the neck, starting with triads on the top three strings, and give equal time to minor keys

Setzer style draws on much more than blues -- there is a lot of early country in it, country jazz sorta, so you might dive into that area of the pool

play the triads of the changes in time with the recordings, varying their locations (inversions) and keeping a steady beat

start with simple songs, then more complex ones, in different keys, including minor keys, always trying to stay in time

you'll discover efficiencies (voice leading) and hear the highest notes of the triads as melody notes

once you get bored of this, start playing little melodies in those triad shapes instead of the block chords -- start with just one or two notes

what you'll find is that you'll be much more confident about where you are spatially and rhythmically, so you can concentrate more on "singing" the single-note melody

that kind of singing is a deep subject and ultimately has to do with how and what you hear and feel

once you're good doing all this on simple songs, over and over, you'll feel the boredom and frustration that leads to jazzing things up -- but you'll now have a basis of fretboard fluency you feel confident about, which is what you need to progress easily into chord and tritone substitutions

part of feeling "stuck" is feeling the desire to run before you've mastered what it feels like to jog

sounds like you're ready to start jogging

good luck, and make it fun
 

Tele22

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I played and sang with a friend yesterday who is a gifted bassist. In the middle of a song he said: 'stop, Stop, STOP'. I stopped and looked at him, and he said: 'You're playing faster and faster.'

Now I know I need to spend more time with a metronome. When I play on my own, I tend to not notice how my speed varies.

I think playing with others would help you get out of your rut.
 

thegaijin

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I’m in the same boat. My problem is that anytime I find a course that looks promising, the teacher just starts talking about dominant this, triad that, 7ths, 5ths, etc and I need to understand what those things mean otherwise it’s like learning Chinese in German to me. I still haven’t found what I’m looking for.
 




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