Fretless, semi-hollow wenge/tineo guitar

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by lbridenstine, Dec 7, 2013.

  1. LightninMike

    LightninMike Tele-Holic

    Age:
    52
    Posts:
    586
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    Location:
    Perrysburg, Ohio
    For the bridge: start out with a straight edge on the fingerboard. where does it meet the bridge? that will help determine how to best set it up. you may take more away from that bridge than you originally thought and still have a stable base since you have the tailpiece at the base of the guitar
     
  2. orangedrop

    orangedrop Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,049
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Location:
    New York
    Dig those tuner buttons!
    There is a silly cool device called a "Vix Bit", which is a spring loaded, self centering drill bit.
    They come is several sizes, and the tiny one is perfect for making a little peck to center the teensy bit for tuners, truss cover plates, etc., I think it is the right size for Tele control plate screws, jack plate screws.

    The medium one is good for bridge screws, and the big one is good for neck plates and such.

    At $15 a pop they were eye candy at the tool supplier for many years, till we had a job that included mounting about 30 European cabinet hinges.

    As the bit plunged into the wood the first time, I was kicking myself for not getting these things years sooner. They speed the process of centering mounting holes, and it works perfectly every time.

    If you break a drill bit, you just loosen a set screw and pop in a fresh bit from your drill box, so it is a no brainer.

    The strings look good, please let me know how you like the tension/feel, and acoustic tone.

    On the polishing compounds...

    Every one I have used dries white, so if you have any open grain your instrument will be covered in white speckles.

    It sounds like you are having good success with the wool, and if you are at all concerned with rust or magnetic properties of steel, there is always bronze wool.

    Used to use cases of that stuff while working on boats and it works very nicely.

    It also looks pretty, and we know it is very important for finishing tools to look cool, impressive, or scary :D

    Are you enjoying working with the shellac so far?

    Since you do so much woodwork in different venues, you may want to have a peep at French Polish finishes.

    A very old technique, and uses "Rottenstone" as a super fine abrasive, and to fill grain.

    Gives a gorgeous deep luster which you can leave, or buff to a mirror gloss.

    It flipped me out when hearing you put olive oil on the applicator to keep it from sticking.

    The oil migrates out of the shellac which dries as you are working it, and the oil gets pulled back up into the applicator. :scared:

    How close to making some sounds would you guess you might be?
     
  3. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    I'll be doing this soon. I've been a little distracted the past few days trying to get the router sled together and doing a little work on a bass that I started recently.

    I'm going to grain fill, so I'm hoping I won't have an issue with polish/wax in the pores.

    I've never heard of bronze wool, it definitely sounds like it looks cool. :cool:

    I'm liking the shellac. It seems to build up a lot faster than tung oil on the test pieces. I don't think there's any way that I'm going to use the whole batch I mixed during its shelf life. I saved half of the bag of flakes for future use.

    I think I'll probably start finishing the guitar next week and maybe have it together the following week, but no guarantee. The finish process should be fairly short on this one, it seems like. I don't think any of the woods I'm using even require a finish.
     
  4. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Well, I used the router sled to work on the horns and that made it MUCH easier to shape them. They're not done yet, but the upper horn is mostly done, lower horn shouldn't take too long.

    [​IMG]

    So, this... I'm not sure what's up with it, but there is no wood right there. Before I did the carving, I could just see a line of glue right there between the wenge and the white veneer, so I thought something was bound to happen in that spot.

    [​IMG]

    I had some other stuff I felt the need to do with epoxy (and binding cement) today anyway, so I patched that and some other things. There's not really as much epoxied as all the tape makes it looks like. It's just runny epoxy and I didn't want it getting everywhere.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    The carve on the top is basically done. :)

    [​IMG]

    I cut off some of the bottom of the top part of the bridge, so that should help a little with the height. I have to shorten the screws so it can sit down flat on the bottom section. I sanded the bottom section to fit the carve too, but I'm going to probably cut off a little from the feet to make it shorter and to make the bridge look a little better sized for this guitar. I still might need to recess the bridge into the top a little too.

    [​IMG]

    I'm thinking about doing this to cover the holes in the tailpiece. It will be radiused on the top and bottom to match the tailpiece radius and probably beveled or something too. Maybe I should add veins or some sort of detail to it to make it look more like a leaf?

    [​IMG]
     
  6. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Radius, bevel and veins would make it look good--maybe thin it a bit, if the radiusing and beveling don't thin it down. I'd also round off the treble side of the tailpiece some, too (the area immediately above the control knobs) . The rest of the guitar has a rounded, "organic" looking form, but the tailpiece has that flat, squarish area, and overall, I think, needs rounding and smoothing of the edges to make the perimeter flow. My 2 cents' worth.

    The carve really makes the top look good. It's coming together well.
     
  7. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    I left it thick for now because the top of the tailpiece post sticks up a little above the tailpiece, so I need to drill a slight hole into the bottom of the leaf for that, plus radius the bottom and top, and didn't want to accidentally make it too thin. It should thin out throughout the process, if not I'll thin it before doing the veins.

    I'm going to roundover the edges of the tailpiece after I drill the string holes too.
     
  8. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    I managed to get the bridge short enough without having to recess it into the top! :)

    [​IMG]

    Someone gave me the genius idea to make the figure of the leaf by using the wood figure, so I made this out of a cutoff from the neck.

    [​IMG]

    That's going on top of the tineo, so the tineo will just be like an outline once it's shaped and I'll have to thin it all down.

    So, I thought the best way to do this was to drill holes through the tineo now for the magnets and the top of the tailpiece post that stands above the tailpiece, that way the points from the drill bits won't poke through the other side.

    [​IMG]

    I have the magnets glued in and used epoxy and ebony dust to glue those pieces together and to fill the gap down the middle of the leaf. Pictures of that next time.
     
  9. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Cool. The leaf design is awesome--looks great!
     
  10. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

    Posts:
    8,508
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2011
    Location:
    Canada
    I see you couldn't leaf it alone. :lol::lol::lol:
     
  11. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Thank you!

    Haha, nope. I like this one better. It's a lot more subtle.
     
  12. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    10,976
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2010
    Location:
    Northern California
    Oi!
     
  13. Citizen_Insane

    Citizen_Insane Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    383
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Location:
    Iowa
    Wow. Way to kill my work productivity today. I just went through all your build threads and they're amazing. Kick ass stuff! I love the unusual body shapes and the killer wood. I'm not usually one for exotic woods, but you know how to match and finish them perfectly!
     
  14. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Wow, thank you! My threads tend to get kind of long, so I hope you didn't actually look through everything. Plus, they probably look nicer in the end if you don't know what happened before that, haha. :D
     
  15. orangedrop

    orangedrop Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,049
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Location:
    New York
    Yeah, dig the leaf cover plate Lisa!
    Are there some sort of registration pins as well so a bump won't slide it out of place and knock it loose?

    The figure makes a great leafy look, and the ebony dust up the middle should be an excellent center vein for your design.

    How difficult is it to remove the magnetic cover plates once in place?

    I have used those neo mags on a lot of cabinet doors, but they are a bit larger than control cavity covers.

    Thank you for all the updates and eye candy!
     
  16. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    The round top (the part where you can use a screwdriver to adjust the height) of the tail piece stud goes up into the bottom of the leaf, so that holds it in place along with the magnets. The magnets are just right as far as strength goes. I think I put too many around the control cover this time because it has a stronger pull than the others I've made, but the truss rod cover and the leaf can be removed really easily.
     
  17. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Hmm--now that you mention it, Lisa, maybe it's a good thing the strings are a bit high. If the TR cover magnets are very strong, you might get string dampening from them.
     
  18. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    I finished up the "hardware" today and sanded all of the wenge to 220 grit.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I read today that oil based finishes are more likely to turn wenge black than water based finishes and so far I had only tested oil based, so I went and bought some water based urethane and it looks like this.

    [​IMG]

    Much better! I'm going to do a white wash/sand back test with it too, just to see which one to go with.

    [​IMG]

    I did the grain fill too. I'm not necessarily going for 100% smooth, but mostly filled should be good.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I also tested the water based poly on tineo and I like the shellac and tung oil look better for that... and the tung oil is low gloss, so I was going to go for that look, but since I'm most likely using the water based poly on the wenge now, I'm not sure if I'm going to make it glossy or not. I guess I'll figure that out after I see how it looks with a couple coats.
     
  19. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    They aren't that strong. I haven't had any issues with them on any of the other builds.
     
  20. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,062
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    The one on the right is my white wash/sand back test piece. I like it, it makes the brown lighter and more visible

    [​IMG]

    so I put some white wash on the guitar.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'll carefully sand it to take down some of the white (hoping that the grain filler doesn't stay white, it's supposed to be charcoal), then start the finish.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.