Fret hardness comparing way

hndrx_inspiration

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Hello everyone,

I used different nickel silver frets of different brands until today. Anyone had a enough hardness for me.

I still have many different brand frets (all of them called nickel silver) and i just want to compare them as hardness. Actually, i just want to know which one is harder compared to others. I can damage them to know the hardness. Is there any tip to comparing hardness?

(I also have stainless steel ones, they are distictly harder than nickel copper, i can feel easily while cutting them. I don't mean the difference between ss and nickelsilver.)
 

schmee

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You need to find someone/business with a Brinnel/Rockwell/Vickers tester. A local community college with a materials or engineering department would probably do it for you. Profs love to do things and get their students to learn from real world experiences.
 

NoTeleBob

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You need to find someone/business with a Brinnel/Rockwell/Vickers tester. A local community college with a materials or engineering department would probably do it for you. Profs love to do things and get their students to learn from real world experiences.

Great idea. Offer to bring them a selection to test.

Post you results if/when you get them. There's little data out there on hardness or even exact composition.
 

Freeman Keller

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Some manufacturers already give the hardness of their frets, usually in Vickers units. Warmoth Nickel Silver alloy (which does not contain silver) is HV170, their copper alloy is HV250, Jescar SS is HV300


Here is how the testing is done

 

old wrench

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If you are using frets of 18% alloy but from different sources - they are all going to measure out at pretty much the same hardness

As far as I know, all of the good wire is annealed after being formed in order to put it in a workable state

18% alloy after annealing will be pretty much the same hardness right across the board, regardless of who is selling it

There are quite a few different metals and different alloys used for frets - Sintoms offers a pretty broad range - I don't know if Sintoms production has been affected by the Ukraine war or not - they are located right next-door in Belorussia

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Killing Floor

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If you are using frets of 18% alloy but from different sources - they are all going to measure out at pretty much the same hardness

As far as I know, all of the good wire is annealed after being formed in order to put it in a workable state

18% alloy after annealing will be pretty much the same hardness right across the board, regardless of who is selling it

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It’s also reasonable to assume multiple fret wire resellers are buying from the same source. Some tool guy help me out. How much would a single die for fret wire cost? And how much for the machine in front? Point is when you’re talking about a company as small as Warmouth or StewMac they’re not selling enough wire to offset the cost to make it.

If you know one brand’s hardness you almost definitely know many others for the same alloy.
 

crazydave911

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In my previous life I traveled a great deal and once had the chance to tour Jescar and took it. Watching the metal being extruded like so much guttering was mesmerizing. It came out, except on one machine in great coils. On the one machine however the wire was heated and straightened then cut in two foot lengths. Took me a long time to figure that one out and as I didn't care for buying or making benders for something already produced in a curve 🤔🤔🤔🤔
 




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