Free heat

boxocrap

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Occasionally see “parasite” shelters hooked up to HVAC exhausts in the city.

34fce779ec72d43684fc873e20bfdf54.jpg
hey gotta survive so..do it in relative comfort?
 

boxocrap

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Thank you to everyone who suggested a supplementary filter. I went down to the basement and saw some dust and a little bit of fine sand in the coal room. Sand? From the clothes dryer? It’s brought in by the dogs. No denying it. I never noticed it before even though I’ve been venting the dryer indoors all winter for years because I just cleaned and painted the entire basement this past fall. We no longer use window air conditioners but I have polyethylene open cell foam filter material. I cut a square and put it over the dryer discharge leaving a little sag where the sand can collect. I’ll check it in a month to see it it has to be cleaned or replaced. A little more work but it’s still free (recovered) heat and with a new high efficiency furnace, I need it down there.
so it was worth the suggestion even if it was to discover the sand then
 

nojazzhere

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The dryer has a good filter and it vents into what was once the coal room in the basement from mid November thru mid April. I never thought of a secondary filter but that wouldn’t be hard to do.
I have to regularly (every month or two) go outside where my dryer vent is, and clean out accumulated lint, to keep the air flow clear.....and that's just what "gets by" the dryer's own filter. I would also remind anyone who does the "vent into basement or living space" to be sure to switch back when the season changes. You don't want to be fighting the AC when summer comes. ;)
 

Willie Johnson

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Opposite of this--if you need to cool your house down, kick on your kitchen stove hood vent. It will drop your indoor temperature 2-3 degrees really quickly.
 

Nightclub Dwight

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View attachment 942962
I have one of these, hanging in my boiler/utility room.

-and one of these, in the garden.
View attachment 942965
I have the same dryer is you! But your indoor unit is much nicer than my repurposed lumber. Those are some neat iron pieces.

I get a lot of satisfaction hanging my laundry to dry for free like a little old lady of yesteryear.

Plus, nothing like the feeling of fresh laundry that was dried outside in the sun.
 

Peegoo

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The amount of moisture in the dryer exhaust can create more problems than it's worth. Mostly mold.

Years ago building codes were changed in many places to prevent builders from venting a dryer into an attic. In cold months, all that moisture condensed on cold metal surfaces (roofing nails protruding through the sheathing, etc.) and over the years the nails corroded away and shingles blew off the roof.
 

JL_LI

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The amount of moisture in the dryer exhaust can create more problems than it's worth. Mostly mold.

Years ago building codes were changed in many places to prevent builders from venting a dryer into an attic. In cold months, all that moisture condensed on cold metal surfaces (roofing nails protruding through the sheathing, etc.) and over the years the nails corroded away and shingles blew off the roof.
That’s a valid point, @Peegoo . I’ve checked the basement for condensation and found none, even on the coldest day. The temperature is nowhere near as cold as an attic and the volume is more than double. It’s also only my wife and me living in the house so we’re not drying anywhere near as many loads as a large family. It’s still worth checking by anyone considering heat recovery by this method.
 

Telekarster

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I don't know man.... After being schooled by @Milspec on another thread about a guy who's having weird issues in his home due to an AC line busting inside his house, I'd be very distrustful about this "free heat" idea. Hot air and moisture are a combo in the home that I think one could be inviting a heck of a lot of problems into their home, regardless of the type of filtering etc. one does... Nice idea and all but I'll take a hard pass ;)
 

teleman1

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This isn't rocket science. No one has developed a recovery system for this that is on the market? Drying wastes so much energy.
 

String Tree

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I posted a thread yesterday about “steam” heat. Well nothing’s free but there is a way to reclaim heat that would otherwise be lost to the environment. Most homes have an electric dryer. That 220V appliance generates 2000 watt hours of heat and plenty of humidity, all shunted outside the house through the dryer vent. Disconnect the dryer hose from the vent and allow it to vent inside the house. Don’t forget to plus the vent outside. You don’t want to allow cold air from outside into your house. You can get sophisticated and have your dryer vent into your heating ducts. I just let mine warm the basement a little. Either way it’s 2000 watt hours of recovered rather than wasted heat. And it’s free.

Free heat. :p
Bad idea.
No.
 

boris bubbanov

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I think Billy is right, that it would depend on your climate as to whether it made sense or not. A lot of excess humidity is the last thing we would need Down South, but I could imagine needing "makeup humidity" in Wyoming or Wisconsin, in the middle and end of heating season.

Clothes are chocked full of water - you probably need that water out of your home, to keep the mold and etc. under control. Also, need to know how old the Slab of your house is (also fresh tile work). A relatively recently poured foundation has a huge amount of water in it - you need to do anything you can to keep your ambient humidity down until that water leaves the concrete.
 

billy logan

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I think an accurate humidity gauge would alert you to vent to the exterior when necessary. Then Bob's your uncle.

In Sweden they extract heat from household water after it's gone down the drain. Don't ask me how :) Flowing water is gonna be warmer than Stockholm in January. Some kind of heat pump system. I've said too much. [edit: That's "after the water has gone down the drain." Not "after Sweden's gone down the drain." I have met the enemies and they are pronouns]

Waste; want.

Lint is a fire danger in everybody's current, typical, status quo "venting through a duct to outside only" situation.
 
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Preacher

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Our old farmhouse in OK was built on a pier and beam foundation. If the temperatures got down into the low teens you might have a little water freeze up under the house. First year we were there we had some water freeze up, had to borrow a friends propane gas heater to blow hot air under the house to thaw the pipes. It probably took an hour with constant heat to get the pipes to thaw.
The next year it happened the friend was out of town so no propane heater. I rigged up the dryer hose to run under the house. Fifteen minutes later the water was flowing again. I later made a little attachment with a flapper door to go under the house. When the weather threatened to freeze the floor I would pipe some heat into the crawl space before nightfall and again in the morning. No more issues with freezing pipes.
 




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