Free BBQ at work!

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by the_lyall, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's

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    Dang, that @Ira7 knows his Q for a New York boy:)

    Did you study in Jawja by any chance?
     
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  2. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's

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    And... @johnny k , I don't think it's our place to teach the French anything about cooking - but it's cool you're interested in BBQ.

    As we say here, ''put some south in yer mouth''. You may find yourself playing more blues after doing the Q. It's all part of the same heritage.
     
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  3. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Out here anything cooked outside can be called barbecue. We are very laid back and since it is the Wild West, we don't have any grammar police either.:cool:

    BTW, are the hotdogs and hamburgers in the U.K., the same things as in the U.S.?
     
  4. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    It s all fine with me ! I d love to put some south in my mouth. And some cajun cooking. And some mexican cooking. I mean the real one. We have some mexican food over here, but i guess it s almost as bland as your choucroute (sauerkraut) .
     
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  5. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh Poster Extraordinaire

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    Soyburgers...
     
  6. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, but Texans think Beef is Barbecue and anyone with serious sense knows, unless it is Pork, it shouldn't be called Barbecue.

    But look at me - I go often to a "Barbecue Joint" and get smoked turkey (or fish or duck if they have it) and eat their wood grilled chicken if that's my only other choice. But at least I understand going in, I'm not eating "Barbecue". Believe me, I still remember well, even if it has been almost 20 years now.
     
  7. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yeah.

    Those guys.

    Sounds delicious! Yah.



    Sorry, Can't make it to your event, Vespa!!
     
  8. the_lyall

    the_lyall Telepathetic

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    The burgers are the same, but usually instead of hotdog sausages we just use regular sausages

    You might use these too, I know nothing of American culture...

    [​IMG]
     
  9. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Anyone who comes to my FREE hamburger and hot dog BBQ and wants to argue about the name gets tofu...

    Also, people that promulgate that ribs have to have "tug" have watched way too many TV barbecue shows. Falling of the bone is not an indication of over done.
    Uh oh...here come the ketchup notzi's!!!:lol:
     
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  10. the_lyall

    the_lyall Telepathetic

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    Yeah, that's a bit much for me! I like either none or a little. But I didn't take a photo and that's the best I could find on Google without putting any effort in to the search...
     
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  11. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I suspected that the hotdogs would be sausages, but that looks like a regulation hot dog bun. I guess as a tourist, I was always seeking local "traditional" food and probably never noticed anything else.:rolleyes:

    Well, thank you. I'm always learning something new on TDPRI.:)
     
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  12. Alamo

    Alamo Doctor of Teleocity

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    What are you drinking with all that stuff? beer at work?

    on the other hand -- it's Friday :p
     
  13. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    You live in Kansas City, one of the premiere Q spots in the country, and learned nothing?

    But wait. You're right in a way, but not all of the way. I should have worded my post differently:

    Falling off the bone is just an indication of being overcooked 90% of the time. They CAN be cooked correctly and fall off the bone.

    But falling off the bone is NOT by itself an indication of a well-cooked rib. It's USUALLY the opposite.
     
  14. the_lyall

    the_lyall Telepathetic

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    Free soft drinks, and either Fosters or Prosecco...

    Have to admit it did concern me, temporarily relaxing the 'alcohol at work will get you immediately dismissed' rule, considering even the forklift drivers were allowed to drink... :confused:

    There was a 1 can/2 cup limit, but nobody was monitoring anything. I didn't venture into the warehouse in the afternoon, I chose life.
     
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  15. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Oh, come on:

    Beef ribs, brisket, and even prime rib that's smoked is certainly Q.

    And although I brine and smoke my turkeys, I never consider them Q for some crazy reason. But I do for chicken thighs.

    Yeah, it doesn't make much sense when you get into poultry. And it's semantics, but since it's low and slow, technically, it's all Q.
     
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  16. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    There's a ton of debate about the roots of modern day barbecue.

    When you look at more modern history, the Revolution through Civil War, it was cattle, and the slaves who had to figure out a way to make the crappier cuts they were given more tender. This historical analysis has nothing to do with the Spaniards, and certainly not Brazil.

    Everyone wants to claim the history as their own, but it's pretty ridiculous. It's just wood and meat, which EVERYONE was using in those days.
     
  17. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    I try to resist the urge of explaining to other folks how the cow ate the cabbage. Sometimes I do it anyway, only to find out how woefully inadequate my previous understanding was.

    I’ve had the opportunity to live and visit a few places and I sure like almost anything cooked over an open fire, or over what a lot of people refer to as charcoal.

    And most folks know, (oh, - ok, limit that to United State-iums?), at least intuitively, that what we in the states refer to as charcoal, isn’t really pure charcoal – most folks at home use charcoal briquettes, a manufactured pillow-shaped object that is manufactured from a little bit a charcoal, sawdust, binding agents (usually a cheap starch), maybe a little coal and limestone dust and frequently little bits of actual wood that are intended to add some of that smoke flavor – hickory or mesquite seem to be popular flavors. One popular brand in the US was developed by a Pennsylvanian (at least according to Wiki) and then along comes Henry Ford and you get Kingsford Charcoal, sold in grocery stores in every state I’ve lived in or visited. Canada? I don’t know.

    Real charcoal, wood burned slowly under deprived oxygen conditions, is a whole ‘nother thing, sure can be used for cooking and was also used for heating and other stuff. From what I read, a whole lot of Europe was denuded of trees on repeated cycles, just for the production of charcoal – burns hotter than wood, was used in the production of iron and other metals, blah, blah, blah.

    Free food from the grill at work? Let me hold out a plate.

    There are certainly barbecue fanatics here in Texas, but maybe no more so than elsewhere. Yeah, ok. Here, hold my beer.

    I like almost all of it, but I still haven’t cottoned to that twangy vinegar sauce from the Carolinas or Viriginia or whoever wants to fuss over that story.

    Burnt ends? Ribs? Brisket? Sausage with jalapeños? Chicken, quail, dove, turkey? Hot dogs, hamburgers, fish and veggies? Pile it on, brother, and pass the sauce. Now give me my beer back.
     
  18. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    It's low ambient heat, 200 to 225 Fahrenheit, some go to 250, with wood that makes smoke. All KINDS of woods:

    Oak, hickory, mesquite, apple, cherry, orange...it's a long list. We use the lump coal as a complementary heat source, and to balance the amount of smoke. Too much smoke isn't good.

    Each wood type imparts a different flavor, with some being very mild (oak) and some real strong (mesquite). And to make it nuttier, some are suited mostly for pork, others for beef, for poultry, etc.

    It's almost like deciding what kind of wine to have with your meal.
     
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  19. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    They CAN be cooked correctly and fall off the bone.

    Yes!!! That's what I mean. I'm almost going to say that process and timing to get the tenderness exactly right so they aren't overcooked mush but still fall off the bone is an art. The best ribs in the world (to me) have no "tug", no resistance when pulling off the bone with your teeth.

    This is the location which serves (in my opinion) the best ribs in the world. They are smoked sauce free, but their sauce is uniquely NOT Kansas City. It's very tomato-y, vinigar-y, and SPICY. It's very rare that they have much tug. I wish they had the option to mail order and ship flash frozen like the other places around here do...I'd send you a slab to see what you think.

    http://www.rosedalebarbeque.com/the-rosedale-story.html
     
  20. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Nice job at the explanation that briquettes aren't lump charcoal. I'll just add that Henry Ford sold his scrap wood from making cars to create the invention of Kingsford charcoal BRIQUETTES, a totally different animal.

    And I lived in Northeastern NC for awhile and couldn't stand that stuff, but I heard that Western NC is the real deal.
     
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