Four Note (Six Note?) Sets; What Was That?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Leon Grizzard, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. Leon Grizzard

    Leon Grizzard Friend of Leo's

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    A few years back there was a thread about four or six note sets of notes, which, as I recall, one could derive all the scales, or finger patterns. Or something. Or calculate the tides maybe. Anyway, some the jazzers were talking about it, and I would like to revisit the concepts.

    Anyone know what I am talking about?
     
  2. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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  3. Old Tele man

    Old Tele man Friend of Leo's

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    Quartal Harmony (stacked 4ths)?
     
  4. Leon Grizzard

    Leon Grizzard Friend of Leo's

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  5. McGlamRock

    McGlamRock Friend of Leo's

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    I always thought tetrachords sounded like an interesting way to make your improvising more 'interval based'

    Well, I guess it's all interval based but when I have played around with the concept that's what I get from it. Or maybe the unfamiliar shapes make my ear do more work...
     
  6. eclipse

    eclipse Tele-Meister

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    In a book called "The Guitar Cookbook" by Jesse Gress he has a bit about Tetrachords and their respective patterns and combinations on the fretboard.
    In it he shows there are three fingering pattern possibilities for any Tetrachord on any two adjacent strings, adjustment to the pattern for the combination of second and third.
    Tetrachords can be combined to form many scale patterns. A major Tetrachords with another played a step above it results in the Major scale. A major with a minor played a step above it results in Mixolydian. And so on.
    Combinations of Tetrachords retain their respective patterns on when move around the fingerboard.
    All in all an interesting and intuitive way to view the fretboard.
     
  7. Leon Grizzard

    Leon Grizzard Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks; very useful. What I am doing is working on left hand/right hand coordination. I watched some videos by Ben Higgins, whose analytic approach to mechanics appeals to me. His advice is to use the three different three-note segments that occur within the major scale and modes: major, minor and Phrygian, and drill those on the different single strings, at a comfortable speed, to burn in the co-ordination between the two hands. I want to add to that, to work on string crossing, and this seems to be the natural extension, using the scale segments one actually plays. Plus the conceptual benefits.
     
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