For you guys with lots of building experience: Still ever mess up?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Joel Terry, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    That's what I'm talkin' about, there are no negatives, always find the positive....

    rk
     
  2. Badbiscuit

    Badbiscuit TDPRI Member

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    .......my first build just got turned into a relic about a week ago :oops:
     
  3. fishtownmike

    fishtownmike Tele-Meister

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    I have some good woodworking experience and i still screw up. Its how you recover from the screw ups. I screwed up today and had some tearout on a lower bout of a guitar i'm building. It will have a natural wood finish so patching was out of the question. I ended up reshaping the contour on the spindle sander (by the way that crapped out after i got done) I had to reshape the whole lower bout to be able to make it blend in well. It worked out well. Yeah the tele bodies not up to specs but the wood was to expensive just to start over. This also made me think of updating my bits to a spiral type bit. Less chance of tearout. Anyone using these type of bits for template body trimming? The one at the bottom of the page.
    http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/katana_bits4.htm#katana_solid_carbide_anchor
     
  4. Brett Faust

    Brett Faust Tele-Meister

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    In a perfect world, the word perfect does not exist.
    Strive for mere excellence.
     
  5. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    When I have taught silversmithing to students, I tell them, "There's no such such thing as a mistake - just a DESIGN OPPORTUNITY". Save all of the scraps; they can make something very unique.
     
  6. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    There's a catch:

    Hobbist (and custom) guitar builders look for variety in each and every build. It's this variety that's the major cause of mess-ups. Something as simple as dealing with a new wood type can make you feel like you've never made a guitar before. All your old techniques fly out the window.

    It's the main reason why guitars from factories are all essentially the same thing. Reducing variability is the key to smooth production.
     
  7. shoretyus

    shoretyus Tele-Holic

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    Shhhhh .... your letting the secret out .... Hey were you that fly on the wall in my latest build....

    Biggest duh moment.... I put my 66' Tele on Terry's blue print... these guitars are mass produced and there is lots of room for error... THE important thing is the centerline. Getting the strings to sit evenly on the fingerboard is one of the most important details.... and there ten ways to ... fudge... things to get that :rolleyes:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. preeb

    preeb Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

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    Mistakes happen when you're afraid they will. It's like working under terror... (I get that here in Israel anyhow...) It's an energy thing. Gotta think positive or even better.... not think at all. Listening to music while working is the key for me (-;
     
  9. crussell

    crussell Tele-Meister

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    The only thing I call a mistake is when the wife catches it before I do. Everything else is just a chance to see how clever you hide it...
     
  10. preeb

    preeb Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

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    LOL...

    I don't know...It kills me to know it's there, even if nobody sees it... I feel the guitar is a "second". I know... I should seek help... maybe go to see a specialist guitar building doctor...
     
  11. FrenchFry

    FrenchFry TDPRI Member

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    So long as you're learning something new, mistakes are part of the process ... new wood, new tool, new shape, etc...

    The mistakes that bother me are the perfectly avoidable ones. These are the ones that happen when things are rushed needlessly.

    I've found that patience is the best way for me to avoid these kinds of mistakes. Unfortunately, I've also found I don't have too much of it!
     
  12. MikeMurray

    MikeMurray Tele-Holic

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    A very wise friend of mine once told me his definition of experienced: Having made all the mistakes possible.

    Very true.
     
  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I don't know...It kills me to know it's there, even if nobody sees it... I feel the guitar is a "second". I know... I should seek help... maybe go to see a specialist guitar building doctor...

    I feel the same way, I used to just throw the stuff out after the " incident", now I look for a way to remove the mistake and still have a good part that can be used somewhere else creatively. As an example, Gibson used to throw out their mistakes in a dumpster. About 10 years ago, some guy on ebay was selling the parts epoxied back together. If Gibson can make mistakes, so can we, it's just more personal.


    A very wise friend of mine once told me his definition of experienced: Having made all the mistakes possible.

    I don't know, I keep finding new ways to do this.
     
  14. preeb

    preeb Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

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    LOLOLOLOLOL !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    This is turning to be a very funny thread... Please stop before you make me make a mistake here...
     
  15. MikeMurray

    MikeMurray Tele-Holic

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    Well man at least you can think you're getting there! Optimism will help ;)
     
  16. cpeters01

    cpeters01 Tele-Meister

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    Making mistakes is just preparing you to be able to answer someones question on this forum with the tag line "please don't ask me how I know this..."
     
  17. SixShooter

    SixShooter Friend of Leo's

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    I'm going to take a different approach with my advice. Joel, you didn't say whether or not you have any woodworking or guitar modification experience. I think it would be wrong of us to give you the idea that you could build a beautiful guitar from scratch without having any woodworking experince. When I decided many years ago to get into woodworking I started out slowly. I started building shop furniture and jigs such as a workbench, router table, etc. and gradually worked my way up to nicer projects. I'd hate for you to go out and spend $600 (easy to do!) on wood and parts only to end up with something disappointing. If you have no experience start with smaller projects. Rehab an old guitar by installing new electronics. refinish an old inexpensive guitar or buy a new unfinished body for a guitar you own and learn how to paint it. At some point in the future all of these skills will come together and you will be able to competently build a guitar from scratch.
     
  18. Armo

    Armo Tele-Holic

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    My new tele is black and chrome. That way you can't see the filler were I had tear out cos I rushed. What the hell, I don't mind. (But I won't do that again.)
     
  19. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Rushing with a router is a very, very bad idea.
     
  20. treadwm

    treadwm Tele-Meister

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    Joel,

    Just plan ahead, research well, practice on scrap when you can and go for it. I built a 2x4 tele just to practice the procedure of building. The next body I made out of nice pine for a friend. He seems tickled to death with it and can't find any of the numerous boo-boos I thought I'd made. Sometimes we're our own worse critic of our work.
     
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