For aircraft enthusiasts: Buying a jet fighter and all the paperwork that comes with owning and flying one.

Telecaster582

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Actually no, the sabre got its genesis from something really different.

FJ-1_in_flight.jpg

This is the FJ-! Fury, which was the direct ancestor of the Sabre. And you might go, "Why does that plane look familiar?"

Well, because the direct ancestor to the Fury was none other than...
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Eeyup, when North American Aviation were developing the Fury, they decided to cut costs down by using the wings, cockpit and avionics of the P-51 Mustang. So for all those who wonder why North American never made a Jet version of the Mustang, they DID, it was the FJ-1 Fury.

In fact, the sabre's familiar relationship to the mustang is so evident that when I saw this sabre fuselage, I was going "That's a mustang."
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Cool! Thanks for the clarification, those planes do look very similar. You learn something new every day!
 

nathan5782

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I remember a few years ago there was a SAAB J35 Draken for sale in Stockton not the same one in this picture


Saab 35 Draken 012.jpg
 

telleutelleme

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When I was flying as a loadmaster on C-130's, my crew was designated as "corridor check-out" for training pilots and navigators to fly the 3 Berlin Corridor routes in 1966. We would often be shadowed by Mig Jets as harassment tactics. You could see the pilots faces when they got particularly close. I was not familiar with the version they were flying back then.
 

Toto'sDad

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I think the Sabre was the American version. I love these early jets!
I don't know if the Migs were, but the Sabre jets were notoriously hard to land. Finally, an old duck name Bob Hoover was hired to teach USAF pilots to land them. He could put one down on a 5000 ft runway, where the official pilots required around 7000 feet of runway. Any way that's the story I read long ago.
 

Linderflomann

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When I was flying as a loadmaster on C-130's, my crew was designated as "corridor check-out" for training pilots and navigators to fly the 3 Berlin Corridor routes in 1966. We would often be shadowed by Mig Jets as harassment tactics. You could see the pilots faces when they got particularly close. I was not familiar with the version they were flying back then.
That's awesome. I did a little googling and found this: https://acesflyinghigh.wordpress.co...german-air-force-1956-to-1969-the-early-days/

Presumably they were MiG-19s, judging from that page.
 

DanglingNutslots

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I don't know if the Migs were, but the Sabre jets were notoriously hard to land. Finally, an old duck name Bob Hoover was hired to teach USAF pilots to land them. He could put one down on a 5000 ft runway, where the official pilots required around 7000 feet of runway. Any way that's the story I read long ago.
I saw him doing aerobatics at Oshkosh once. Think it was in a Shrike if I recall. That’s about 20 years ago.
 

Toto'sDad

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I saw him doing aerobatics at Oshkosh once. Think it was in a Shrike if I recall. That’s about 20 years ago.
I've seen him do a show with the shrike and a P-51 back in the early to mid 80s. He flew the P-51 over Minter Field outside Shafter California an old training field from WWII inverted at 350mph about 50 feet above the runway! He cut the power on the Shrike way out then did some rolls and stuff, landed and rolled up and stopped about 50 or 75 feet from the fence completely without power.
 

Blazer

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As I stated before, former Eastern Bloc countries often have LOADS of surplus aircraft on airfields, which are a goldmine for plane enthusiasts looking for something cool to fix up and fly on the "Cheap"

Such as this former Bulgarian air force MiG-17


The MiG-17 is closely related to the MiG-17, and it's when you put them side by side that you'll see the difference between the two types.
qe2zS.png

The blue outline is the MiG-15 and the Red Outline is the MiG-17, which has a longer fuselage to house the afterburner and sharper angled wings and tail surfaces.
 

DanglingNutslots

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As I stated before, former Eastern Bloc countries often have LOADS of surplus aircraft on airfields, which are a goldmine for plane enthusiasts looking for something cool to fix up and fly on the "Cheap"

Such as this former Bulgarian air force MiG-17


The MiG-17 is closely related to the MiG-17, and it's when you put them side by side that you'll see the difference between the two types.
qe2zS.png

The blue outline is the MiG-15 and the Red Outline is the MiG-17, which has a longer fuselage to house the afterburner and sharper angled wings and tail surfaces.

Your paragraph under the colour photo needs one of the 17s changed to a 15 I think.
 

Cosmic Cowboy

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That was a very capable plane in it's time. In it's great climb rate and higher speed turn rate, it owned the skies over Korea until the sabre came into the scene and could out rate the Mig 15 in the 2 circle dogfight. Sabre also had slightly better high altitude performance.

Also Sabre pilots had automatic gun sights which was the determining bottom line difference maker.
 




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