For aircraft enthusiasts: Buying a jet fighter and all the paperwork that comes with owning and flying one.

Blazer

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Well, this is a MiG-15 one of the most iconic jet fighters in the world. I told the story about how it came to be a couple of times before, but since my last time, there have been a lot of years gone by.

So let me start at the beginning: at the end of the second world war, there was a lot of German research and development into jet technology that fell into the hands of the Soviets. But the resulting jet fighters such as the Yak-15 and the MiG-9 were...PRIMITIVE, to say the least.
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The problem was that they were powered by reverse engineered German engines, which were terribly unreliable and needed to be replaced after only 400 or so flying hours, which is a very low number. It was realized that in order to take their own indigenous jet technology to the next level, the Soviets had to turn to the West for help.

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This is the Rolls-Royce "Nene" a proven and reliable power plant which was being licence built in the USA by Allison and in Spain by Hispano-Suiza. A delegation was sent to the UK to procure the Nene and the deal was settled...over a game of pool.

The Nene was to the MiG-15 that particular grain of rice which made the meal delicious, and the plane was secured a place in history and infamy as soon as it took to the sky and went into service.
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But not that long afterward, it was realized that the pilots of the MiG-15 had to be trained and that the two seat trainer planes of the soviet air force wouldn't suffice. There needed to be a dedicated trainer version of the Mig-15.
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Enter the MiG-15 UTI.

Very much an unsung hero, the MiG-15 UTI became a very successful plane on which many pilots cut their teeth and most of them were converted fighters after the latter version went out of service.

These days the MiG-15 is a well liked sight at air shows and the type has a hardcore following with the War bird community, who buy their planes from defunct former eastern bloc air force stocks, like for example Albania, Bulgaria or Romania.
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Albanian MiG-15's abandoned and largely forgotten about but still in fairly good overall shape, since the strict security of the airfield they're kept on, kept vandals at bay. It's a gold mine for aircraft enthusiasts who want to fix them up and fly them. Many Cold War era jet has found a new lease of life thanks to that.

So you CAN buy a genuine jet fighter for peanuts, fix it up and fly it yourself.

But, how much paperwork goes into actually doing so?
Well, this two parter of a guy buying a MiG-15 UTI answers that, and it will probably keep you from buying a MiG-15 EVER!


 

Old Deaf Roadie

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I used to assist with the annual inspection of Bill Reeseman's MiG-17 when he was based in Aurora, OR.
The guns were still there, but had a torch used to make them impossible to fire. The old avionics had been removed & replaced by a 50 lbs. steel plate.
He also had a Yak-50, a Lear 24, and a Cherokee 6.
 

bottlenecker

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Probably not a good time to glorify Russian fighter planes....

That's silly.
It's a plane, and it's history has value. The german jet technology that "fell into" soviet hands was because Russia liberated Germany from the Nazis. Quite a contrast from the Russia of the moment, but it's also part of the context of the moment.
On the other hand, it's just a plane.
 

mexicanyella

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As always, I love reading @Blazer ’s plane threads.

A guy my dad knew told us he once bought into some group ownership arrangement of a F-86 Sabre (or maybe it was group lease of, or something) and the costs and paperwork and fuel were staggering.

I don’t think he ever got fully checked out to fly it before backing out.
 

Linderflomann

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Nice thread. I've got a real soft spot for cold war era Russian fighter jets. They have a kind of similar appeal to me as brutalist architecture, there's beauty in how crude they were. The MiG-15 actually comes across as a bit more refined as some of the later offerings, with its rounded edges and all.
 

Blazer

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Probably not a good time to glorify Russian fighter planes....
Which is why I hesitated with posting this thread in the first place.

But I never talk about the governments behind the creation of the planes. I talked about the Luftwaffe and the Messerschmitt 109 multiple times, but NEVER talked about the evil government of [email protected] Germany.

This is just about the plane itself and the cost that comes with actually flying it.
 

Linderflomann

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This is just about the plane itself and the cost that comes with actually flying it.
Yes, we should be able to talk about the plane without bringing up current events, particularly since the plane is only used recreationally these days.

If it were up to me, no war planes would even exist at all. But that's not the world we live in, unfortunately.

I can still appreciate their looks and engineering.
 

tintag27

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In 2002 I photographed this single-seater MiG-15 at Cosford aerodrome in Shropshire, UK. It carried the livery of the Polish Airforce.
Walking round it, I was a bit shocked to realise how small this iconic swept-wing jet fighter was - maybe so, but it still had a streetfighter air about it - this dog might be small, but it could still tear your arm off if you looked at it the wrong way...

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Telecaster582

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As always, I love reading @Blazer ’s plane threads.

A guy my dad knew told us he once bought into some group ownership arrangement of a F-86 Sabre (or maybe it was group lease of, or something) and the costs and paperwork and fuel were staggering.

I don’t think he ever got fully checked out to fly it before backing out.
I think the Sabre was the American version. I love these early jets!
 

Blazer

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I think the Sabre was the American version. I love these early jets!
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Actually no, the sabre got its genesis from something really different.

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This is the FJ-! Fury, which was the direct ancestor of the Sabre. And you might go, "Why does that plane look familiar?"

Well, because the direct ancestor to the Fury was none other than...
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Eeyup, when North American Aviation were developing the Fury, they decided to cut costs down by using the wings, cockpit and avionics of the P-51 Mustang. So for all those who wonder why North American never made a Jet version of the Mustang, they DID, it was the FJ-1 Fury.

In fact, the sabre's familiar relationship to the mustang is so evident that when I saw this sabre fuselage, I was going "That's a mustang."
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schmee

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It's interesting how the F86 Sabre, which flew first, and the MIG-15 were so similar, although the MIG was terribly unreliable reportedly.
 

Blazer

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When I was actively flying, I seriously considered a share in one of these. The problem was things happen really fast in these small jets and unless you’re flying these almost daily, you’re not going to be at your best in an emergency. They are so cool though.

Yeah, they aren't all that easy to fly as this clip will show.
 

ChicknPickn

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Yes, we should be able to talk about the plane without bringing up current events, particularly since the plane is only used recreationally these days.

If it were up to me, no war planes would even exist at all. But that's not the world we live in, unfortunately.

I can still appreciate their looks and engineering.
For me, the ME 262 was one of the coolest twin engines ever. There were great engineers in wartime Germany.
 




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