focusrite 2i2 and sm57 for recording guitar

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by Kmaxbrady, Feb 17, 2020.

  1. Kmaxbrady

    Kmaxbrady Tele-Meister Vendor Member

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    Wow thanks!
     
  2. cravenmonket

    cravenmonket Tele-Meister

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    Sounds really nice to me. That's a very traditional set-up, and frankly you're getting lovely tone. Your playing is very, very good! I've heard lesser players sound awful in pro studios with great engineers.

    I think part of the reason it feels "quiet" is because you aren't getting much room in your mix. One dynamic mic (SM57) up close isn't recording your amp the way you hear it in the room with your ears. You need a second mic, preferably a condenser, preferably a large diaphragm, a little way away from the cabinet. That mic will pick up more of the ambience of the space you're in, and your recording will sound more natural, as you hear it in person.

    Then finally in your mastering phase, to get more volume in your mix, you need to work with EQ and some compressors to bring up the volume without spoiling the tone. Mastering is a true art - don't expect to get it in a weekend, or by watching a few YT videos. As a skill it's infinitely vast, like building a cathedral. So many little things have to come together, but the result is (hopefully) awe-inspiring.
     
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  3. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Tele-Afflicted

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    Hi again.

    This is a good point. While my original advice above was to shove the SM57 up against the grill cloth dead centre, that was a 'can't really mess it up' starting point.

    I think you can actually get a great recorded tone with one mic (so, the above advice can also be the end point). Two however can be great too. Or even, great-er. It kinda depends on the music and mix, I feel.

    I suspect however, that for a simple set-up or mix like you did, the two mic technique (close and ambience) might work better.

    I currently like an up close, on the grill cloth dynamic mic and a capacitor (aka condenser) mic further back. This gives me a nice balanced, full kind of sound. I record with one into each input on the 2i2 to two separate tracks in the DAW (one track set to input 1 and the other track set to input 2).

    To avoid phase issues, I just move the room mic around and test in each position until I get the waveform signals aligned in the DAW. Just adjust the waveforms to be very large in the Workspace of GarageBand - the sliders for this are top right within Workspace (see photo below). Then, move the playhead so you can see if things are aligned. Here's an example. It's not two tracks of the same sound recording (don't have any on my laptop at the moment), but rather double-tracking, but it gives you the idea (actually, I'd go larger than I did in the example photo below).

    While we're at it, as a general rule, dead centre for the close mic will be brighter, and moving towards the outside of the speaker will get progressively warmer. You can try double mic-ing these positions too (I get more use out of close and room though - again, ymmv).

    Screen Shot 2020-02-26 at 19.11.45.png

    Pax/
    Dean
     
  4. cravenmonket

    cravenmonket Tele-Meister

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  5. LKB3rd

    LKB3rd Friend of Leo's

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    You could go for a nice simple clean tone with your 57 up close, and add "space" in software with a room setting/preset on a reverb, if you have one that does that.
     
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