Floating the stratocaster bridge is GREAT, until....

scottser

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You're doing it wrong.
When you get a string in tune, whammy the ****e out of it by pushing all the way down so when it returns to rest the string is in tune. Do each string like that. Lubing up your nut, string trees and saddles always helps.
That way, every time your guitar goes out of tune, a quick belt of the bar will bring it back to pitch at rest.
 

Hey_you

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I had found out there is a balance between the trem springs, and the string tension. I was not pleased before I learned/figured that out. I also have the spring tighter on the bass side,opposed to the hi-side. Makes sense to me. Plays in tune way better after that.
 

Chiogtr4x

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I don't have any issues with mine after many years-
- I use only D'Addario 10's* as these are my faves and last setup was done with these (* I happen to think string tension varies among brands even when identical gauge, so I stick to these, to keep floating bridge in balance- just right!)

- I change strings after 3 gigs ( to avoid breaking strings in the first place) and prefer doing one string at a time- so the guitar is close to in-tune when changing strings

- i stretch each new string ( pull string along it's full length) and retune a few times, till each string has settled to pitch
 

drmordo

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I haven't really had this problem. Unless I'm tuning the guitar above the standard E tuning (which I just wouldn't do with a floating strat), my guitars are stable.

How many springs are you using?
 

Swirling Snow

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Sounds like your baseplate is at too great an angle.

What you need to do is tune some strings down, else it's an unending circle of one-up-manship.
 

Peegoo

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@Hey_you

Increasing or decreasing spring tension on one side but not the other does not change the tension on the strings on one side of the bridge. It's the same tension all the way across because the bridge plate is solid and pivots on a single axis. If you're noticing a change, it's due to the overall increased spring tension that results from tightening one of the claw screws. Same goes for spring alignment (/|\ versus |||): it makes no difference.

As an illustration of this, here's a Piper J3 aircraft rudder control cable and how it actuates the entire surface...not just the end where it's attached. The rudder, like the bridge plate, is solid and pivots on a single axis.

Piper-J3-Empennage.jpg
 

loopfinding

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IMO it’s vastly inferior to the jazzmaster. even set up for floating, the transition to up bend feels jerky compared to the JM. and on the JM, the locked setting always keeps you in tune for string breaks or retuning. and the strat saddles often bind up on up bends, whereas the JM always returns to pitch, whatever you do with it.

i always keep my strat down only. i can’t justify owning a JM just for the trem. the strat is more ergonomic when standing, and the neck pickup sounds better. so that’s the compromise for me.
 
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Flip G

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When I got my first Floyd Rose, the internet instructed me to tune in THIS order to maintain tension at the bridge.

High E, Low E, B, A, G, and then finally D.

I also did this thing where you stick a short stack of playing cards under the bridge to prop it up, then stopped going crazy with the tuners when the cards began falling out.

Something along the lines this guy's doing.

How To Set up a Strat Floating Tremolo _ Two Pivots Tremolo _ Whammy Bar 4-44 screenshot.png


 
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drmordo

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I run three in mine and have not had that issue.

I know that if two springs cranked are enough to hold the tuning that it seems the same as three springs, but it doesn't really work that way. I am no engineer, but as I understand it the force a spring exerts depends on how much it is stretched. So, two springs may be able to resist the pull of six strings the way three springs does, but that doesn't mean the two springs will act the same when more tension is applied (i.e. you tune or whammy the guitar).

Remember Hendrix played 9s tuned to Eb, but he used all five springs.
 




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