Fixing chip in fretboard.

Midgetje94

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Hey everybody! I’m working on a build. I have a old LTD neck donated by the local music shop haha. It needed a severe cleaning. And a new nut. The fretboard has a chip missing. I assume it happened when someone blindly pulled the old nut out.

I don’t think it will really hurt anything not filling it. I was just curious if any of y’all have a relatively easy way to fix that and fill it in?
 

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Toto'sDad

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Hey everybody! I’m working on a build. I have a old LTD neck donated by the local music shop haha. It needed a severe cleaning. And a new nut. The fretboard has a chip missing. I assume it happened when someone blindly pulled the old nut out.

I don’t think it will really hurt anything not filling it. I was just curious if any of y’all have a relatively easy way to fix that and fill it in?
I had one almost like that. I went to a hobby store and bought two or three pieces of rosewood for a buck or so. They were about an inch wide, maybe a sixteenth thick, and six inches or so long. I took the one that looked the most like mine, and ground up a little of it using some 80-grit sandpaper. Then I took the pile of sawdust and put it on a piece of glass, mixed some Superglue into the paste and QUICKLY smeared it into the crevice using an ice cream stick. I let it dry overnight, sanded it down, polished it with some 1500 sandpaper, and oiled it lightly. When I was finished, you could not see any sign the spot had ever been there.
 

Midgetje94

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I had one almost like that. I went to a hobby store and bought two or three pieces of rosewood for a buck or so. They were about an inch wide, maybe a sixteenth thick, and six inches or so long. I took the one that looked the most like mine, and ground up a little of it using some 80-grit sandpaper. Then I took the pile of sawdust and put it on a piece of glass, mixed some Superglue into the paste and QUICKLY smeared it into the crevice using an ice cream stick. I let it dry overnight, sanded it down, polished it with some 1500 sandpaper, and oiled it lightly. When I was finished, you could not see any sign the spot had ever been there.
May have to go to hobby lobby lol.
 

dented

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I had a pit in my fret board of a Melody Maker. The fret board was lightly sanded to get dust off of it and then mixed with epoxy to create a natural filler. It worked out tremendously. Obviously you would have to form that. Best of luck.
 

Midgetje94

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I forgot to mention I cleaned the area I put the patch on with alcohol using a Q-tip before I put the paste in it. You have to move quickly though, or you'll have to start over!
I figured I’d clean it with alcohol. Anytime you’re working with adhesive it’s a good idea.

I figured I’d have to make a barrier with painters tape so I can use it to better “build up” the mold
 

Midgetje94

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I really wouldn't worry about that. It's a battle scar. :)
That’s honestly what I was thinking. But wanted to hear some input. To make sure I wasn’t “just justifying being lazy” lol. Once it’s ready I’m actually gonna take it to the guitar shop and have a custom bone nut made for it. So it shouldn’t be an issue
 

ElJay370

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I use a similar technique as Toto’s Dad. I’d create a “dam” using blue tape to keep the nut slot and headstock face clean, then fill with super glue and rosewood dust. Shape, sand, and polish when cured. Done well, it’ll look it never happened.
 

ghostchord

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I agree with wouldn't worry about it. Generally speaking there's two techniques for dealing with these situations. The smaller chips can be addressed with colored glue or glue mixes with sawdust (typically superglue). Larger chips (like this one IMO) are properly addressed by making a piece of the same material that will fill the hole. E.g. you'd cut a little triangular piece of rosewood, trying to match the grain and other patterns best you can, you'd shape the chip and the piece to a perfect match, and then you'd glue and clamp it in (typically with wood glue). When executed properly you will not be able to see the difference even under close inspection but it does require some amount of woodworking skill.
 

Beebe

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You can also mix the sawdust with shellac instead of super glue if you want a reversible/temporary fix.
 

Lou Tencodpees

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I just had that happen to me after popping out the nut. Not as prolific, but I had the chip (much smaller than the one pictured). After a couple of dozen failed attempts to seat the chip back in place (edge of fretboard) with the intent to wick a pin drop of thin CA, I gave up.

Yep, battle scar.
 

Midgetje94

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I may just get a close color furniture finishing marker and try to blend the color in a bit more and call it good
 

stxrus

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To me it’s a non-issue. If you can’t deal with the divot, the fix is really easy. Take your time, be critical with your repair mixture, and it will turn out ok for your application
 

Beebe

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I figured I’d clean it with alcohol. Anytime you’re working with adhesive it’s a good idea.

I figured I’d have to make a barrier with painters tape so I can use it to better “build up” the mold

I bet there is a tape or material you could use that your glue wouldn't bond to.
 

Toto'sDad

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I figured I’d clean it with alcohol. Anytime you’re working with adhesive it’s a good idea.

I figured I’d have to make a barrier with painters tape so I can use it to better “build up” the mold
Those are good suggestions. I probably did something similar it's been a long time since I made the repair. It was on a guitar I wish I had kept for sure. A diamond anniversary Tele. It was an American Series precursor to the American Standard. It came with basically the same pickups that the AV 52 had. It sounded better than either of the AV 52 Teles I'd had at the time. Played like a dream, so of course I had to sell it. I think Momma did raise a fool she just would never admit it! ;)
 

Toto'sDad

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I use a similar technique as Toto’s Dad. I’d create a “dam” using blue tape to keep the nut slot and headstock face clean, then fill with super glue and rosewood dust. Shape, sand, and polish when cured. Done well, it’ll look it never happened.
Honestly, I was amazed at the results, it was as you say, like it never happened.
 

Toto'sDad

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That Diamond Series Tele had the best sounding neck pickup of any guitar I ever owned. It had a great sounding bridge pickup too. The middle position was distinctively its own. I truly cannot stand success! My wife has asked me; Why do you get rid of guitars you love, and keep the ones you don't? If I knew the answer to that question, I could quit wearing this dunce cap, and looking into the corner all of the time.
 

posttoastie

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Just use some white glue. Its thick and water will clean up any mess. Just use a toothpick and do a drop and let dry. Repeat as needed. Then just barely sand or leave as is. Color brown with Marks a lot your done. Put on some Old 97s when doing the minor repair.😁
 




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