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Fix belly cut carving gone wrong

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by newuser1, Jan 17, 2021.

  1. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Holic

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    I'm building a lefty Jaguar and I overdid the belly cut carving and now I have a tiny hole in through the upper control plate cavity. This is going to be a solid color body so I guess I can fix that.

    I was thinking of mixing some epoxy and filling the bottom of the control plate cavity where the hole is. Would that work? What would you do if you had that problem?

    IMG_2883.JPG IMG_2882.JPG IMG_2881.JPG IMG_2880.JPG
     
  2. Addnine

    Addnine Tele-Meister

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    I'd glue something (shimstock?) on the backside as a "dam," then fill it w/ superglue or sumthin', then sand it flush. Then I'd paint it and forget about it.
     
  3. E-miel

    E-miel Tele-Meister

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    I think I would glue a thin (3mm) piece of wood on the (whole) bottom of the cavity.
     
  4. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ouch!

    Good advice above.

    I remember a thread from many years ago by a guy wanting to thin out the back of the neck on a Strat. He went at it with a sander, and then popped up and asked what that "silver spot" was in the middle of the neck. ZOIKS!
     
  5. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    1/8 inch wood veneer cut exactly to the footprint of the control cavity rout. Glue it in with wood glue or white glue. If the glue squeeze out doesn’t fill the hole through to the back, then use a little bit of wood filler from the outside.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
  6. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

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    Yes, a thin piece of wood covering the bottom of the cavity would do the job. For strength, I'd use a little epoxy to attach it.
     
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  7. GFrank

    GFrank Tele-Meister

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    Bondo.
    It is the best material I have ever used for filling wood, especially on curved surfaces. It bonds well to wood, sets up very quickly (so know what you are doing beforehand) and sands easily like wood (unlike most super glues/epoxies, which are much harder than wood). I learned about it years ago when I worked for a high end frame maker for very expensive art - I am surprised more people don't know how great it is for wood working.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
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  8. NoTeleBob

    NoTeleBob Tele-Meister

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    I like the wood and epoxy idea... bondo if you need to fill on top. Of course that's only if you're committed to the painting idea. You'll need a primer-sealer to make sure the surfaces cover the same. The easy way is just the bondo with a little plastic or metal window screen on the inside embedded in it for strength.
     
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  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd glue a solid wood plate the shape of the control cavity. It would be glued down to the floor of what you have now with a caul.
     
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  10. Deeve

    Deeve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    tiniest f-hole?
    ;)
     
  11. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    I'd glue in a little wood block & carve it smooth. and epoxy
     
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  12. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Since it's going to be a solid color, all that's really necessary is a bit of epoxy or Bondo (as noted above) in the corner of the cavity to fill that one small hole. Gluing down a piece of wood cut to the shape of the cavity is an option, but that would take a bit of effort to cut to the right size and shape, and isn't really necessary for such a small gap.
     
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  13. Henley

    Henley Tele-Holic

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    Not if you used a template of cardboard or paper from the mortise.
     
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  14. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Bondo is a great wood filler...but unnecessary in this case, if the bottom of the cavity is "capped," so to speak. I wouldn't bother mixing up a two part filler for something that is only just barely a hole. The A.R. wood glue should squeeze through and do the job. Sanding and sealer should do the rest.

    Heaven forbid that a proper repair should take "a bit of effort." :D:D

    All he needs to do is use his routing template to trace the right shape onto a 1/8" thick piece of wood, cut to the line, and then finely shape it to ensure a good fit around the unevenly routed area. It's a 10 minute job to craft the "cap," at the most.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
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  15. BerkshireDuncan

    BerkshireDuncan Tele-Meister

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    [​IMG]Just glue in a cut-to-shape offcut with this stuff. Sorted.
     
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  16. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm sure there are other thin areas nearby to that opening that are ready to crack or break off if put under pressure. The plate would add some support to that area. You could epoxy the plate in and that would fill the gap there to at the same time.
     
  17. Addnine

    Addnine Tele-Meister

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    This makes sense. If that spot is all the way through, it must be perilously thin elsewhere as well. So this is a better idea than mine.
     
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  18. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

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    What @guitarbuilder said re: circumventing potential issues down the road!
     
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  19. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Holic

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    I glued a small 1/8 thick piece of wood at the bottom of the cavity covering the hole. The Titebond squeezed through the hole so I'll probably will just have to lightly sand it tomorrow. Emphasis on lightly :)
     
  20. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Titebond will show up badly under transparent finishes but as long as you are going opaque that shouldn't be a problem.
     
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