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First Build - from scratch

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by thecableguy, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Did the roundover last night.

    Used a 3/8 bit:

    [​IMG]

    Test cut was a little deep. This area is getting carved away anyway:

    [​IMG]

    That's better:

    [​IMG]

    These areas were the ones I was most worried about. They went fine:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Rounded over front and back:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'll try and shape the contours this afternoon.
     
  2. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    A little late to the discussion, but some thoughts:
    I handle the bandsaw the same way you did: lots of relief cuts and a 1/4" blade.
    As for the "little" drill press - just make an auxiliary table with some laminate on both sides of a scrap.
    Control layout: The simplicity of a vol-vol-tone (PRS) layout is tempting, and so is your L6 rotary switch, but I'd hate to lose the option of toggling from the "woman tone" (neck pickup with tone rolled off) to full-whack (bridge pickup with the tone wide open).

    As for the thickness of the top, since you're not carving the top in the area of the controls, you really don't need long-shaft pots (and it might not be available on the rotary switch), so I guess the cavity depth is going to depend on the control hardware you choose. That's where forstner bits (and a real secure depth stop on the drill press) come in handy.

    And I have to say, that's a very nice wood selection and glue up.
     
  3. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Sorry so late to reply. If your going the underwound route, then the specs of the original PAFs would probably serve you well. With the longer Fender scale and those controls it will be real sweet. Keep in mind on the L6 those Bill Lawrence humbuckers contribute a great deal to it's sound as well. Those were underwound but used 3 ceramic mags per pup...............a large one in the center as well as two thin ones outside the polepieces to lower and spread the magnetic field (and were potted in epoxy :eek:). Plus it's a true 27.75 fretscale. Your guitar will sound like your guitar, and the way it's going, that will be a darned good thing :D
     
  4. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Hey man, thanks for the input. Never too late to join in.

    I like the mahogany as well, and it's not too heavy since I've routed the pockets. My glue lines aren't perfect, but thanks, I'm glad they look alright to someone else. I need to get a proper jointer. I did these with a straight edge and a router.

    Let me know if you have any suggestions on finishing, or anything else. If the wood looks good when I'm done then I think I'll do a transparent finish of some sort.
     
  5. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    Looking good , nice clean work , that body looks good , I would grain fill that with mahogany tinted filler and clear it , I think it would look great , what did you get the weight down to ?
     
  6. JeffPBlues

    JeffPBlues Tele-Holic

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    Just found this one! Very nicely done so far. That body is looking really good!
     
  7. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks very much Herb. I guess a light brown filler would work hey? Do you have to thin it first to fill the grain?

    I'm not sure what the weight is. Just a sec... there's a scale in the kitchen...
     
  8. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Alrighty, it looks to be just under 5 lbs:

    [​IMG]

    Will lose a few ounces once the contours are finished of course.
     
  9. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I like Behlens Por O Pac Mahogany tinted filler , I've had good results with it , I have also used Timbermate Natural on ash , that worked well too , except it smells like a dentist office when they drill teeth , yea , either mahogany tinted or brown tinted , I thin filler down to a touch thicker than honey , and put on nitrile gloves and really rub it in with the fingers , then I scrape the excess off with an old credit card going across the grain , then when it just starts to haze/dry I buff it off with burlap , but what ever method works for you is good , just when you think you've got it all filled though , fill it again , its easier to grain fill with filler than to have to spray an extra 4 or 5 coats of finish to fill the pores. The weights not bad , you should end up under 8lbs when done ;)
     
  10. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    I wonder if a kitchen scrubber pad would work as well? And is the grain filler applied after final sanding, or do you still do a final sanding after? Thanks for all the help Herb.
     
  11. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Thank you very much Jeff!
     
  12. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I wouldn't use a scouring pad , I found that or sanding would pull the filler out , I don't sand grain filler at all if I don't have to , I fill after final sanding , buff the filler off with burlap , let dry , fill again , buff off let dry , then sanding sealer , usually 2 -3 coats , block sand level , if there are still pores showing I'll give a couple more coats of sealer , block sand again with 320 g , then if all looks good go with clear , sounds like a lot of work but its not bad , after a while you get a feel for what works best for you
     
  13. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Started removing wood for the arm contour. Also note the ingenious dust extractor I rigged up :p

    [​IMG]

    Wow, the rasp works quickly. Note that my ingenious dust extractor was moved because it didn't work ;-)

    [​IMG]

    Another exciting shot:

    [​IMG]

    Got it close to the line and switched to the finer side of the file.

    [​IMG]

    It's still too thick at the body edge. I want the top and bottom radii to become one. I'm going to head back out later and use the rasp some more. Should be able to get the arm contour done and start on the beer gut contour. :-D
     
  14. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Ah yes, I was wondering about sanding sealer (as you can see I'm a total beginner).
     
  15. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    Hey Brian , we all began as beginners :) just stick with it , there's a lot to learn , and that's the best part ;)
     
  16. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Final sanding before the grain filler. Don't bother going any higher than 220 grit on bare wood.

    Mahogany really benefits from a dye stain. Transtint, diluted in water, sloshed on and wiped until it's even. that might make the wood a little fuzzy, so you can knock it back with a proper scotch brite pad (not a kitchen scrubber please).

    Then grain filler, then a sealer and topcoat.

    It might be a first time scratch build, but you haven't fooled us into thinking it's the first time you've made something out of wood.
     
  17. Bentley

    Bentley Friend of Leo's

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    Make sure when you grain fill to wipe as much grain fill off with a credit card. Trust me.
     
  18. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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    Yep, learning new things is a bit of an addiction for me.

    Sorry I meant a scotch brite pad.

    I googled transtint and it doesn't look like it's available in Canada. I'll check around locally and see what's available.

    I've built dovetailed amp and speaker cabinets (along with the amps that go in them) so I do have some woodworking experience. That was easy compared to this though. :)

    But I need my credit card to order my parts from Stew Mac! If I use an old Tim Hortons card will that hurt the tone???
     
  19. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

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  20. thecableguy

    thecableguy Friend of Leo's

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