Finishing spruce

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by zorgzorg2, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Hi all,

    I just built a body for my next guitar and I made it out of Norwegian Spruce:[​IMG]

    The middle part is thermo-roasted spruce (which smells delicious btw :) ).

    Now I want to finish that.
    I really like the spruce as it is now, but it will become yellow with time, which I'm not really found of, so my idea was to whiten it. I have some water-based white stain I used to pain my wooden walls, and that could work, although the wood rings become greyish rather than keeping their color... I there a better idea to keep the wood with this colour ?

    After that I was going to use Tung Oil (this one, in swedish though: https://www.k-rauta.se/byggvaruhus/kinesisk-herdins-träolja-1l : seems to be diluted tung oil, with even a little linseed oil mixed to it). My understanding is that I could use is on top of the water-based stain as long as I wait for the stain to be really dry before I apply the oil, right ?

    Then it would be nice with a nice shiny gloss on the guitar, it that achievable with tung oil ? Any resources on how to do that in that case ? Otherwise I'll just go for the oiled finish, it would be fine too.

    I have to point out that I don't have any spraying equipment and any place I can spray this time of year, so I'd rather stick to rub-on types of finishes. I tried water-base poly lacquer last time, that I applied with a brush, and I'm not too happy with it, I couldn't really get rid of the brush marks... I considered shellac with french polishing, but that looks like a LOT of work. Not that I'm against it, but I'd rather start easy and try more complicated stuff for the next builds...

    Any help/links/comments will be highly appreciated !

    Cheers,
    Martin
     
    Cgrove and puddin like this.
  2. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    ALL oil based coatings/oils/resins will yellow and/or darken over time, some sooner than others; some more subject to UV light. Linseed, tung oil, varnishes etc etc.

    A "water white" (clear, non-yellowing) lacquer would work best - but as you can't spray that makes it a bit tough. Alternatives are very thin polyurethanes and polyesters - same problem.

    And to get the grain as "white" as possible to start with takes a wood bleach system, preferably the 2- process type. Stain will add color but not remove the color that's there, which will bleed into the stain.

    I honestly can't think of a non-spray system that will stay as neutral as you want.
     
    DrASATele likes this.
  3. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    oh, ok, so maybe I should go for another colour then :) I will check the bleach system though, thanks for the tip.
     
  4. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Ok, so I decided to go for the white stain after all, and apply water-based poly after that. Now, I did apply this water-based poly on my previous build, but I got a bad case of the stain bleeding into the poly. And it didn't really go away, even after 10 coats. So is there a product to put on top of the stain to "fixate" it before I start with the poly ? Especially since I want the darker wood in the middle stain-free...
    whitegt.jpeg
    Thanks,
    Martin
     
  5. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'd try shellac as a barrier coat to lock in the stain.
     
  6. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    Thanks! I tried on a piece of scrap wood, and this stain I used didn't bleed, which is good :)

    So now I'm applying water based poly using a foam brush. Don't know how many coats I have to apply, but I'm at 5 now. I will put a couple more I think, then wait for a week for the poly to cure to full hardness, and then start the sanding/polishing.
     
  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    It's hard to advise you when you don't mention the specific products that you had problems with. Normally problems like bleed-though are due to the finish being a type that dissolves the resins in the stain. "White stain" and "water based poly" are meaningless terms by themselves. Without being able to look at product data no one can do better than throw darts in the dark.
     
  8. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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