Finish Question

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by edeibler, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. edeibler

    edeibler TDPRI Member

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    I'm working on a baritone build with an ash body. I'm doing a translucent pink burst (white center fading to pink edges and back). I want to stain with a darker color, first, and then sand down in order to highlight the grain and have it show better through the burst. The question is, what color do I use to highlight the grain?

    I know it sounds odd, but I was actually considering lime green, since it sits opposite pink on a standard color wheel.
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    That just calls out for practice on scrap. Personally I think it will go wrong but since I've never tried it I don't know.

    Here is one I was going to shoot translucent red and I wanted to pop the figure in the maple. I tried four different stains with different amounts wiped on some scrap and shot a few coats of red over them

    IMG_3328.JPG IMG_3334.JPG

    I thought I was going to like the blue but ended up with red stain and red tint.
     
  3. Orpingtons

    Orpingtons Tele-Meister

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    I have to ask the question, how are you going to stain the guitar white? I have some white dyes and the process can be challenging, depending on the wood.

    I guess you're shooting trans-white lacquer, if that's the case you're going to need a spray gun, StewMac says that you can do it with aerosols but I've never seen one that looks truly professional and done with the rattle can.
     
  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    First - you are starting with sanding sealer, right?

    then applying the dye or stain (controlling color depth with a solvent-dampened cloth).

    Then to get the dark color you tint grain filler/paste wood filler. That is what "pops" the grain! I'd use a deep reddish-brown, like a Gibson back color. Once sanded you'll just have that in the deep grain!

    That's the simplest method to do what it sounds like you want. Sanding back to a color is a total crapshoot.

    Dark tinted grain filler is the most common product for the effect you're talking about. Get your lighter color using dye or stain after sanding sealer/sanding - then grain filler, tinted (2-3 applications are needed if you want it really smooth) - then you sand it and all the flatter areas go back to the dye/stain color..

    Apply another coat of sanding sealer, sand it - then you can use semi-transparent lacquer toners (Mohawk makes dozens in aerosol or you can tint your own using clear and universal colorant). Once the final color is dialed-in you apply 5-6 clear coats, the last one or two as "flow" coats to level it out - then go straight to the buffer! All lacquer coats except the last couple should be applied using 3 VERY light passes per coat..and a single coat should not really cover all that well until you get to the last one or two.

    But all of them melt into each other creating one single coat with amazing 3-d effects if you use the methods outlined.

    Just be SURE to practice the ENTIRE system - from prep to buffing - on scrap wood, and get you techniques worked out perfectly - before starting on the actual guitar! Practice, practice, practice, and be patient!

    Good luck!
     
  5. Orpingtons

    Orpingtons Tele-Meister

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    Some people use Danish Oil, with sanding between coats, to accentuate the grain and seal it.
     
  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    It works well alone or with a varnish or polyurethane topcoat - but there's no chemical adhesion between Danish oil (boiled linseed oil, polymerized oil - the "grain hardener" component, which is a varnish - and oil stain.) and lacquer, and the lacquer doesn't penetrate the hardened gain, compromising adhesion. It's also a poor sanding sealer - you can't add dye or stain very effectively and control color depth, so if you want an additional shade you're out of luck.

    Danish oils also require extremely long dry times before they can be topcoated; most continue to "leach" for weeks - even months. They're intended as all in one stain/finishes. Some may se them, but there are both easier and more effective ways of achieving the colors the OP's looking for.
     
  7. edeibler

    edeibler TDPRI Member

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    The finished product. To get a true white, I should have first bleached the wood. But I'm quite happy with the result. IMG_0655.JPG IMG_0656.JPG
     
  8. Orpingtons

    Orpingtons Tele-Meister

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    So it's a natural finish at the center, not a "white" finish..... Thanks for the pic, looking good!
     
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  9. Orpingtons

    Orpingtons Tele-Meister

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    I never it to be used with lacquer. I use oil-based grain sealers when I shoot lacquer. And yes, they can be a pain.
     
  10. edeibler

    edeibler TDPRI Member

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    It simply wasn't turning out how I had envisioned it. As indicated above, I think it would have worked had I first bleached the wood, making it as light as possible.
     
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  11. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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  12. Orpingtons

    Orpingtons Tele-Meister

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    It can be a pain to "stain" the wood white, but it can be done. If I want a MK finish, I just shoot lacquer! LOL
     
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