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Finish over danish oil needed?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by ecoli, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    It's enough to do MANY necks.

    Only ***** a small hole in the foil and store the bottle upside down, so the bits that cure once opened are at the bottom of the bottle
     
  2. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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    No, you don't need to finish over Watco, and it's not a finish that I would choose to use as a sealer to be finished over. Watco is great stuff. I've seen people use it to finish boat interiors. It won't chip or peel. It's easy to fix when it gets walked, and as for using it on a neck, it feels great!

    I don't believe there is any linseed oil in it. I believe it mineral oils with dryers. It doesn't yellow the way LO finishes do.
     
  3. vibrolux 1956

    vibrolux 1956 TDPRI Member

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    Read the current material safety data sheets, RAW LINSEED OIL. major componet.:rolleyes:

    There's a color difference in boiled linseed oil and raw linseed oil. ALL finishes yellow, all woods discolor, the amount can vary.
     
  4. vibrolux 1956

    vibrolux 1956 TDPRI Member

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  5. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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    You're right, I stand corrected. I used it a lot 30 some years ago, and I thought I remembered differently. I do see it's now owned by Rustoleum, who is owned by RPM, don't know if anythings changed. Regardless, I've used it, and had friends use it recently, still a great product.

    I still question the LO part though. Boiled Linseed Oil is not boiled, it's raw linseed oil that has had driers added to it. I'm not a chemist, but it looked to me that the "cobalt compounds" listed are the driers to make it "boiled linseed oil". Are there any chemists in the house?
     
  6. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    Git 'em vibro!

    He's right BTW...
     
  7. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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  8. vibrolux 1956

    vibrolux 1956 TDPRI Member

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    @Codger, I was just curious. I've done lots of exterior and a few nautical projects with Watco stain top coated with varnish, its a great durable finish for the PNW if you like that look. Many do.

    I rarely get to pick the finish, usually have to use what the architect, designer, and client decide on, although sometimes we can influence. I have no real experience with anything but lacquer on guitars. I have sealed the back of some sanded necks with profin oil, but it's synthetic and dries hard as glass. I've lacquered lots of guitars, cabinets, and furniture over the past 45 years. In the past 20 years I have come to like conversion varnish a lot and have thought about using it on a guitar someday if it were the right project.
     
  9. Codger

    Codger Tele-Meister

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    I would think that would be a good use. I don't think any of the Watco products have any UV blockers, but they do penetrate well. Outdoors it's good to have the UV blockers. Covering the Watco with a good exterior varnish might be a good combination.
    I'm not familiar with Profin, just took a look at their site. I use to use Armada and Cetol on boats a bit. Is it sort of like that? They were very hard and tough, chemically resistant and very abrasion resistant. The thing I didn't like about them was that they were hard to repair when they got wacked, hard to sand and hard to feather in.

    I lived in the Caribbean for a bit. Epiphanies seemed to be the most popular down there. It's tung oil based, could take a blow without chipping, and you could sand it and feather in repairs. It stood up well to the UV, and it would break down from the top down rather than letting go at the bottom, so you could sand it and recoat it to keep it going. That's what I've used on the boat ever since. It would be too soft for a guitar though. I think Waterlox is the best interior tung oil finish I've used. I know there are some others I haven't used.

    Don't have much experience with conversion varnishes. I know a lot of folks have used them and love them. I know they are tough, but have you had good luck repairing them when something happens?
     
  10. vibrolux 1956

    vibrolux 1956 TDPRI Member

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    I have not had the need to do that, but I doubt that it would be "spot repair" friendly. Spot repairs in my world are few and often not an acceptable solution. I did blueprint plan tables, desks, and some office furniture for a contractor almost ten years ago. All 1" apple ply and maple, natural color, conversion varnish. Offices are in constant use for all of this time and it still looks much like it did the week we installed, a slight color change is about all. Even the best lacquer finish in that enviroment would have been looking well worn within a couple of years.

    I have had great success doing spot repairs and feathering in with profin, with it's self and with poly finishes. I've used it on the backs of sanded poly necks a few times and it blends well and is never sticky. I rarely endorse anything, but i have high regard for profin. Only downside is a short shelf life, once opened it will skin up on top.
     
  11. vibrolux 1956

    vibrolux 1956 TDPRI Member

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    Good point, living in the PNW where much of our sunshine is liquid, and my back deck for instance never sees sunshine even on a clear day, I forget that some would need to consider that.
     
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