Fingerpicking Clocks - Coldplay (not really a fan...)

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by tele-rain, Nov 21, 2019.

  1. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

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    I’m not at all a Coldplay fan, but this song is in one of my beginner guitar mags as an easy fingerpicking lesson. And dammit, it really is. Easy in the sense that it’s just 3 chords and repeats over and over. But not easy for me the forever novice, whose fingers play it perfect one time and fumble the next one.

    I know I’ve posted about this hurdle before...about how you can play it great then mess up. So allow me to think it through and share my strengths and weaknesses. Sometimes putting it out there can make me hold myself accountable to it. I think the key for me is to play it at a comfortable enough pace to be able to change chords without missing the beat...and ONLY THEN worry about speeding it up. I think that’s my problem, I get the flow going and my fingers automatically start picking up the tempo. I am guessing the way to correct this is with a metronome? Whenever I try that I get more thrown off, but I think that is part of the problem and once I get used to the metronome, it can solve a world of issues for me.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Hey, tele-rain, I hear you - and I feel your pain, so please allow me to share my insights.

    For me, a metronome is a useful, but boring, one dimensional tool.

    What I have recently discovered is that practice has become more edifying - and more fun - when I play along with instrumental jam tracks!

    With jam tracks, you learn alot about musical styles and timing, but you also learn how to become a "contributing" member of a band. Furthermore, jam tracks are an excellent tool for practicing scales and keys.

    You can find free, instrumental jam tracks, for all genres of music, in any key, on YouTube, but here are two (2) of my favorite collections:

    Elevated Jam Tracks
    Tom Bailey Backing Tracks

    Good luck in your musical endeavors!
     
    Jim622 and tele-rain like this.
  3. tele-rain

    tele-rain Friend of Leo's

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    Ah thank you, I knew I wouldn't be alone in this hurdle...misery loves company, haha!!

    I just found that youtube channel and will explore it during my next practice sessions. On the surface, it seems like it may be a bit harder at this point for me. In this case, would I find a jam track that is in the same key/tempo as the song I'm practicing? Or probably slower until I get it going? Or do you mean more for just practicing scales within a musical backing track, which I can see how that would be super beneficial. The whole key/chord progression thing is another thing I struggle with. I understand it on the surface, but haven't really dug in to get a grasp on it yet. But perhaps that is another thing that is holding me back! If I
     
  4. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Firstly, let's impose the KISS principle, baby steps, and intertwining theory with improvisation, so...

    Firstly, learn the string names and the notes on each string.

    Secondly, download, and learn, the Circle of Fifths diagram. The Circle of Fifths, in simple terms, contains every Major chord and its corresponding Minor chord. Every song is written in a key, which we'll call "home", and every song will typically contain the "home" chord AND the chords in the boxes immediately to the left and right of "home".

    Thirdly, download, and learn, the Minor Pentatonic Scales diagram. This diagram contains five (5) shapes along the fretboard, and each shape contains root notes tied to the key in which you are playing.

    By learning the Minor Pentatonic Scale shapes, you now know the Major Pentatonic Scale shapes (which are simply three (3) frets below the Minor Pentatonic Scale shapes)!

    Now, select a backing track in any key , and practice playing along, with: 1) the chords in that key, and 2) the scales in that key.

    Playing to a backing track is fun, but it is also unforgiving. The good news is that you'll "hear" your mistakes immediately, and know where you need more work/practice.

    Remember, you only get OUT what you put IN, so practice, practice, practice! ;)

    Good luck! :)
     
    lewis likes this.
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