Finding Ones Singing Voice

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Texicaster, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. Tele22

    Tele22 Tele-Meister

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    Singing in a mic definitely takes some getting used to. I use a clone of the Shure Beta58.
     
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  2. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    One of the cool things about singing with a mic is you have the choice of going stronger/louder or softer/breathier to go high. If you get the knack of using the mic to control your volume, you can get away with singing some parts softer than you would unaided and compensate volume with mic position. You can sing into a directional mic from different angles and distance to control tone. This is especially true if you record yourself with a condenser.
     
  3. eddiewagner

    eddiewagner Poster Extraordinaire

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    Good advice here. I. Can add that it’s getting better with practice. I can not sing in D. No sweet home Alabama for me, sorry.....
     
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  4. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    I'm not sure there is much to be sorry about ;):lol:
     
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  5. Tele22

    Tele22 Tele-Meister

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    Funny thing is, my voice feels most comfortable in Ronnie Van Zant’s range - Skynyrd is relatively easy for me to sing.

    CCR/Beatles/Freddy Mercury/Eagles - not so much. For these songs I need to use a capo or play the song in a different key.
     
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  6. rand z

    rand z Friend of Leo's

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    To be a good singer means being a good listener.

    There are people with good natural-born singing voices. But, who are not necessarily good singers.

    And, there are people with not-so-good singing voices who listen closely to the great singers and their various styles.

    Then, they practice hard at copying some of those stylings.

    Slowly, over time, they forget all of that...

    ...and start singing in their own voice and style.


    IT TAKES LISTENING, PRACTICING.. AND TIME.

    Some recognized Great Singers:

    Frank Sinatra
    Ella Fitzgerald
    Ray Charles
    Linda Rondstadt
    Merle Haggard
    Roy Orbinson
    Billie Holiday
    Vince Gill
    Freddy Mercury
    Janis Joplin
    Van Morrison
    Jackie Wilson
    Aretha Franklin
    Emmylou Harris
    Marvin Gaye
    Boz Scaggs
    Dolly Parton
    Nat King Cole
    Sam Cooke
    Sade
    Gordon Lightfoot
     
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  7. fendrguitplayr

    fendrguitplayr Poster Extraordinaire

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  8. Backbeat8

    Backbeat8 Tele-Holic

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    Let's be honest, pretty much most Male singers have roughly the same range, a couple octaves.
    Middle C.png

     
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  9. Pickingthru

    Pickingthru TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

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    What a fine thread. About five years ago, I suffered a paralyzed vocal cord after an operation. A couple of corrective operations later, most recent last May, my talking voice sounds very close to normal. I have only one vocal cord that moves. Was never a great singer but could entertain a crowd with just me and my guitar. I'm now trying to rediscover my voice since I have a strong desire to get back to playing for others. I'll certainly be following this thread.
     
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  10. Tele22

    Tele22 Tele-Meister

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    Jaime Vendera has some useful free warmup MP3s on his web-site. He stresses over and over again the importance of keeping the throat and vocal cords healthy.
     
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  11. cousinpaul

    cousinpaul Friend of Leo's

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    Regarding choosing key, I approach it song by song. Find the highest notes in the song and pick a key where you can sing the passage without straining.
     
  12. RoarDog

    RoarDog Tele-Meister

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    Unless you have an extraordinarily limited range you should be able to sing in all keys, finding ones register would be a more appropriate term. I got into singing late in the game at about 28 or so. Couldn't even belt out a G above middle C in the beginning I can hit the D above tenor C in head voice hope I get more low end in time.
     
  13. ladave

    ladave Tele-Holic

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    Excellent thread!

    Have always wanted to sing but never liked what came out when I tried it. And singing in public is probably one of my biggest fears.

    Back when I used to drink and play acoustic I would sometimes sing and occasionally something decent sounding would come out, usually after 1 drink...I think the alcohol would relax my vocal chords or something to where I was better at it.

    But after more drinks I'm sure it got really bad.

    All of these great suggestions make me want to try again.
     
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  14. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    raise your eyebrows more when you sing descending lines

    seriously, it helps
     
  15. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Loving this thread. Very inspiring. Not to hijack the Op's thread, as I ramp up again on my voice training, my throat is dry and sore the next day. How long should I do interval notes at first and what is a good way to warm up, cool down, etc.?
     
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  16. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I lost mine when I had the flu in 2002. Can't find it anywhere.:confused:
     
  17. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I've been singing my repertoire songs almost daily. My voice has improved a hell of a lot. It helps getting to know the songs much better, but I also feel like I'm getting more control of my phrasing. I'm actually enjoying it. I think the the main thing for me was to just keep practicing. There were times I thought that maybe I should just work toward being an instrumentalist, but I'm glad I kept working through it.
     
  18. nomadh

    nomadh Tele-Afflicted

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    I think I have your same problem. I go to sing a BS song and I try and sound like Ozzy. Or a soundgarden song and God forbid try to Chris Cornell it. Because you hear it in your head.
    So I try and sing women's songs. Sing a heart song and I automatically drop down an octave because my misogynistic subconscious "doesn't wanna sound like a chick" :)
    Try piece of my heart or an old Motown song or eurythmics. It's a good trick for this problem and an octive lower is a good beginner's Male starting point.
    The other is take a simple acoustic song and capo it up and see if it gets stronger or until it breaks. Then drop an octave.
    Also good to play a simple song very very slow. Stop at words,. Decide what octave you are on when a chord changes. Find the weak spots and where you can take a breath. Do that transposing or capoing. This also so breaks you away from the original you can start to just do what sounds best with your voice. My next trick is trying to find a popular artist who is similar enough to me I can just assume I can do his songs his way. So far I'm unique.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
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  19. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    we used to sing major arpeggios followed by a descending line, like this:

    Screen Shot 2019-12-08 at 10.42.31 AM.png
    first two notes, sing the vowel "ee," then "ay" on the g, then "ah" for everything else

    this exercise gently stretches your range and keeps you attentive to pitch when descending, which is when most people tend to sing progressively flatter as they go down

    start on a different pitch each time. we usually went up the chromatic scale. people dropped out when things got the slightest bit uncomfortable for them in the upper range.

    this is meant to be GENTLE stretching
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2019
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  20. Tele22

    Tele22 Tele-Meister

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    I've come up with two approaches for dealing with vocals in songs which are beyond my range:

    1) either I shift the key a 5th (e.g., Bm -> F#m, D -> A, C -> G, and so on), or
    2) I capo two frets higher and then sing the melody an octave lower (E >F#, B - C#, and so on)

    If neither of these approaches work, I've got problems …

    Just grabbing a capo and sliding it up the neck never really worked for me.
     
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