Finding Ones Singing Voice

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Texicaster, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. muscmp

    muscmp Tele-Afflicted

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    be careful with anithistaines as they can dry you out. probably better would be using a netipot.

    play music!
     
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  2. Peegoo

    Peegoo Tele-Holic

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    Record yourself singing and pay close attention to the things you recognize that need improvement.

    Taking at least a few vocal lessons is *great* advice. Most of your tone and power comes from breath control, and lessons will help you with this.

    I don't have the ability to hit high notes I could when I was younger, so I modify the melody when necessary.

    Some people make singing look really easy, but they worked hard to get there.
     
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  3. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    Texicaster,

    Can you post a sound file or video of you playing and singing?

    No advice we can offer you will do any good without a foundation upon which to build that advice.

    Everything else is sort of like ad hominem slogans on the wall of the book store or guitar shop.

    Thanks in advance, good sir.

    :)
     
  4. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I searched for ages for my singing voice ... Finally, I looked behind the couch ... There it was !!! And most excellent, if I do say so myself ... Best of luck in your quest!!!
    PS ... you develop your voice ... It doesn't magically appear ... Time and practice bring results ....
     
  5. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    This is an excellent thread. Thanks to the Op for starting it and to those who have contributed to it. I've been working on my singing.
     
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  6. Boil

    Boil Tele-Holic

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    Yes take a few lessons, you don't need to make a career out of it just get some objective feedback and some pointers, I did exactly that and it helped an enormous amount, my initial plan was to do 6 weeks of lessons but I found I enjoyed it and ended up doing a year of them, best money I ever spent.
     
  7. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I sang in a community choir for two or three years, during which I heard good singers up close and discovered how poor I was by comparison. I usually could hit notes, but couldn’t sustain them, and my tone was thin.

    I found a teacher about 18 months ago and spend $20 for a half hour weekly lesson. It took a year of lessons and daily practice (much of it doing Jeff Rolka’s warm-up while I’m commuting), along with continued choral singing, to begin to overcome decades of lousy technique and bad habits.

    Learning to better control my release of air and reduce tension in my throat and jaw are the challenges. When I started lessons, the prospect of singing in front of a teacher alone in a room was enough to produce enough tension to ruin my vocal quality. Showing up week after week, which is I know to be a luxury, has allowed me to learn to relax. I may still sound like Leon Redbone, but now it’s more like him at his best than at his worst.
     
  8. jackleg

    jackleg Tele-Meister

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    many can sing in several keys. but, having a great timbre is paramount. finding the key that resonates is 'finding your voice'. nothing worse than hearing a male singer straining to hit a note out of his range. if you have to sing louder to hit the note, it is probably the wrong key. the capo idea is a great solution and you maybe surprised with your results.. i recently saw mark knopfler with a capo on the 5th fret. it put the song in his wheelhouse. good luck
     
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  9. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I started off singing, accompanied by guitar about 40 years ago. I was a mimic singer then. If it was a Dylan tune, I tried to sound like him. Same with Neil Young. As a result, I never really found my own voice. I found that many of my original songs even sounded Dylanesque, even going so far as to talk the lyrics instead of actually singing them.

    In the last ten years, I have made a conscious effort to find my range and my true voice. I have been hearing improvements. It’s taken a lot of hard work and practice to get to this point.

    My wife is my coach. She tells me right away if a song is out of my range, so I’ll change the key or slap on a capo. If it still doesn’t sound right, I ditch the song.

    There many techniques that one can do on his/her own, without spending money on lessons.

    One important point that I forgot, if you are able, always stand to sing, yeah with a strap.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2019
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  10. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    IMO this post is dead on. If you go down from C, you’ll have a good idea of your vocal range. Now you’ll need a coach. You’ll need to learn proper breath support to extend your range up or down. Work on intonation. Singing flat not only sounds out of tune, it sounds lifeless. Once you’re on pitch you can work on dynamics. It takes a lot of work to sing softly as well as you sing at high volume. CHVRCHES is a band based in Glasgow. They’re a pop synth band. Lauren Mayberry is the vocalist. Find a live festival concert on YouTube and listen to her. Perfect pitch and great modulation. Then find an acoustic session and listen to how she sings backed by a grand piano and a classical guitar. Perfect pitch and great modulation at a quarter the volume. You can’t just pick up a mic and sing anymore than you can just pick up a guitar and play. Good luck to you.
     
  11. stratoman1

    stratoman1 Friend of Leo's

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    I used to not mind singing but that was a long time ag . It would take me a few months to tolerate my own voice again. It takes a lot of work no matter how much raw talent you have
     
  12. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    Singing VOICE, heck - I have been searching for 66 years, I think it's irrevocably irretrievably lost, I'm sticking with humming, harmonica, and shouting a couple words when appropriate. I have a heck of a radio talking voice or so I've been told from my years as a aircraft pilot, and tactical radio use. I feel blessed just to give any utterance, no longer looking for MY singing voice.

    Even though I did sing very well with a young lady for about a year when I was 23-24 years old. We could harmonize really well and she could coach my pitch along whenever I slipped off key.

    When I was really young I had a crappy childhood voice instructor, that didn't want to teach me, he was just humoring my mother because her voice is an "11" on a scale of 1-10, and he was willing to do anything to keep her in their choir.

    Record yourself and work from there, but before you get discouraged get a GREAT voice Coach, you will know when you find him or her.
     
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  13. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    long time choral singer (baritone or second tenor) here

    the third fret on the A string is C below middle C

    if you can sing the F below that loud and clear, you're a bass

    the first fret on the B string is middle C; if you can sing G above middle C comfortably, you're probably a tenor

    baritones whose voices get clearer and stronger in the upper range may be second tenors, but the sound will be warmer and rounder than a true tenor's

    like this guy:



    at 3:22, he sings an F# above middle C, and it sounds rich and full -- that's because he's a second tenor or maybe a "baritone martin"

    here is a true tenor:



    dear God, at 4:20 he sings a thrilling B natural below high C, and it sounds ... like he just hit a boost pedal, like his soul just broke clean free

    THAT my friends is why tenors are rock stars. I'm sure Björling had additional notes above that one

    but range is not really definitive of the kind of voice you have: what is definitive is where you sound BEST

    tenors have a timbre that baritones don't have, namely, a ringing trumpet-like clarity above middle C

    baritones sound warm and noble in the upper bass clef, like Merle Haggard

    basses are like Josh Turner and Trace Adkins: they can sing comfortably below the bottom G on the bass clef and still be LOUD

    if your voice loses power down there, you're probably a garden variety baritone

    here's the real kicker: even among average baritones there is huge variety because skull and sinus architectures differ greatly

    there is a lot that is genetic about all this, but no worries: unless you want to sing at the Met and compete with genetic lottery winners, good technique and acting ability will count for a lot

    have FUN
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2019
  14. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I’m not a great singer but my range is OK and I can sing a few particular songs decently. I’ve found working on breathing (mainly not letting too much air leak out of my throat while singing) and learning to relax/singing more like my speaking voice has helped.
     
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  15. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks!

    I was trying to make a video but something wrong with sound. Photobooth used to work for some guitar lessons I was taking online and sharing but now it's like super compressed mp3 from 1990....

    What's a good Mac app for recording vocals?

    TEX
     
  16. ddewerd

    ddewerd Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    It took me a long time to get my vocals where they are today, and I still struggle at times.

    Definitely find your range, but also know your limitations.

    I have a fairly deep voice. One of my problems is that as I'm trying out a new song, I tend to play unplugged. I'll get through the verse just fine, but often times there will be a note or two in the chorus that is too high for my range. Because I'm unplugged and singing softly, I subconsciously drop down an octave and it sounds OK. It's not out of key technically, but it doesn't always work for the song.

    What really helps me is to plug in and sing through a mic. This is more the real life scenario. You hear it differently - and it more realistically depicts an actual gig situation.

    If I can pull it off plugged in, then I'll keep working on it. But there's tons of tunes I've jettisoned because I realized they just didn't fit my voice.

    But keep it up and keep working on it - you'll find what works best for you. I spent many years being afraid to sing. I've been playing a trio for the last 15 years, and I sing about a third of our songs (and luckily I am blessed to have an outstanding bass player who can really sing)

    Cheers,
    Doug
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
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  17. Tele22

    Tele22 Tele-Meister

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    Singing (well) is a huge challenge, which keeps it interesting.

    In the rehearsal room, songs sound horrible the first time I go through them, since it takes time for the right notes to be stored in muscle memory. After much repetition, they sound much better.

    I learn songs by singing along with the originals, just like learning guitar solos note-for-note.
     
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  18. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Good question!
    Some songs (not many) I can sing like me but others I fall into trying to copy the original artists style.
    Key there seems to be that big singers have a style, or else a few like Johnny Cash sing it straight but have a voice.
    I can do a pretty wide range down low to normal and even really like singing in falsetto.
    But seldom have I felt like I had my own voice, and I've been singing since the first two albums by The Band came out and I could sing them straight through every song.
    I also learned sea shanties as a kid and could ape some of the accents on whaling songs IIRC sung by Ewan MacColl.
    Those are a lot of fun to sing, and enjoying it is pretty important.

    The only key ingredient I know is to sing with no inhibition.
    Belt that **** out like you have as much right to your singing voice as Pavorotti or Dylan!
    Given that range it's clear we all have a right to belt out a tune.
    As noted, the "authenticity" of fallibility may be endearing to the listener.
    At the mic I tend to sing low where there is little strain, and right on the mic so I don't have to holler.
    The mic and the PA might help, or might not.
    I like the proximity effect, but my clarity suffers with the sort of booming tone I get right on the mic.

    Singing in the shower might be good practice because it feels safer to holler at whatever volume your mechanics work best at.
    Some singers do better at a whisper than others.
     
  19. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    The first song I chose to sing in public was "Moanin' The Blues". I was drunk in a piano bar, but the experience scarred me for life :). If you're gonna be a bear, be a Grizzly, so they say.

     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
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  20. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    word

    make every vowel and consonant count, especially the dumb ones

    one of the things that's truly weird about singing into a mic is that it's a fricking *microphone*: it picks up everything and is sitting there right next to your mouth

    first time I did that, it was like singing confidentially into someone's ear at a loud party

    it changes the way you sing

    when you're in a resonant space like a hall or a church, you sing naturally. there's nothing between you and the world and the space is all around you: it picks up your sound and carries it, so singing is more like pushing a note out into space, like a skiff in a pond

    by comparison, singing into a mic is like singing into a vacuum cleaner

    I guess it's best just to ignore that and sing like nothing's there?
     
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