FINALLY I'M GETTING PROPER INTERNET.

Kandinskyesque

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
1,739
Location
Scotland
Two years ago from my hospital bed, I made an enquiry to the UK's big monopoly that supplies our internet/telecoms infrastructure about improvements on our 6mbps internet connection.

A month later I somehow stumbled into coordinating a community broadband initiative on behalf of the 16 houses in our area.
It involved canvassing homes to see who was interested (everybody was). Liaising with the Scottish government and UK Department of Culture, Media and sport to enrol our community for a broadband rural communities voucher scheme.

Around 300 emails later, dozens of meetings, site surveys and a fight with the local council (who tried to hijack our funding), I finally got word today that we now have a live fibre broadband network with 1Gbps internet speed and we individually get to chose our own service providers.

It's been a bit of a journey, frantic at times with telephone calls, emails and meetings. The worst part was the endless months of nothing.
The fight with the local council wasn't too pretty either, fortunately we stuck to our guns or our funding would have ended up supplying with 50mbps fixed wireless broadband.

The 4G signal here is good so my internet service has been a cell phone tethered to my computer for the last 5 years but it's slow and weather dependant for a decent signal.

Today the network was signed off and I now can enjoy 21st Century internet.
The irony is, where I live was where the ambitious Victorians built (at that time) one of the worlds largest and forward thinking public water supplies.

Only 2 more weeks until I'm connected and I'll be needing to find a new reason to fight with Mrs K other than who's turn is it for Netflix (her conference calls trump everything mind you).
In celebration, I'm going to connect 2 computers in every room to stream movies simultaneously for the sheer hell of it.

I'm grateful for the help from two of my neighbours who picked up the slack when my health was at its worst but I'm quite surprised what I managed to achieve from my bed at times when a trip to the kitchen felt like a marathon.

I just thought I'd like to share my feeling of slightly smug satisfaction mixed with utter relief.
 

Greggorios

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Posts
6,620
Location
NY
Two years ago from my hospital bed, I made an enquiry to the UK's big monopoly that supplies our internet/telecoms infrastructure about improvements on our 6mbps internet connection.

A month later I somehow stumbled into coordinating a community broadband initiative on behalf of the 16 houses in our area.
It involved canvassing homes to see who was interested (everybody was). Liaising with the Scottish government and UK Department of Culture, Media and sport to enrol our community for a broadband rural communities voucher scheme.

Around 300 emails later, dozens of meetings, site surveys and a fight with the local council (who tried to hijack our funding), I finally got word today that we now have a live fibre broadband network with 1Gbps internet speed and we individually get to chose our own service providers.

It's been a bit of a journey, frantic at times with telephone calls, emails and meetings. The worst part was the endless months of nothing.
The fight with the local council wasn't too pretty either, fortunately we stuck to our guns or our funding would have ended up supplying with 50mbps fixed wireless broadband.

The 4G signal here is good so my internet service has been a cell phone tethered to my computer for the last 5 years but it's slow and weather dependant for a decent signal.

Today the network was signed off and I now can enjoy 21st Century internet.
The irony is, where I live was where the ambitious Victorians built (at that time) one of the worlds largest and forward thinking public water supplies.

Only 2 more weeks until I'm connected and I'll be needing to find a new reason to fight with Mrs K other than who's turn is it for Netflix (her conference calls trump everything mind you).
In celebration, I'm going to connect 2 computers in every room to stream movies simultaneously for the sheer hell of it.

I'm grateful for the help from two of my neighbours who picked up the slack when my health was at its worst but I'm quite surprised what I managed to achieve from my bed at times when a trip to the kitchen felt like a marathon.

I just thought I'd like to share my feeling of slightly smug satisfaction mixed with utter relief.
So good to see initiative and hard work paying off. Your neighbors owe you and the others their appreciation.
 

Milspec

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Posts
8,044
Location
Nebraska
Result!

When we had fibre installed to the house, it was a revelation over the old VDSL setup we had previously. Bye bye copper wire :cool:
My results weren't as good. They installed the fiber 5G to my house 4 months ago, but my office was located upstairs in the attic some 200 feet from the where the line was installed. The installer said that they couldn't install that much wire snaked up through the walls to reach my office, so a wireless router would have to be used.

I didn't know better and agreed only to discover later that my desktop didn't have an internal wireless card so I had to use the damn USB adapter to get internet. That 1 Gbps 5G service to the house is now slower than the DSL service that I had before. A lot more temperamental as well.
 

Cyberi4n

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Posts
1,233
Age
49
Location
Chester, Uk
Two years ago from my hospital bed, I made an enquiry to the UK's big monopoly that supplies our internet/telecoms infrastructure about improvements on our 6mbps internet connection.

A month later I somehow stumbled into coordinating a community broadband initiative on behalf of the 16 houses in our area.
It involved canvassing homes to see who was interested (everybody was). Liaising with the Scottish government and UK Department of Culture, Media and sport to enrol our community for a broadband rural communities voucher scheme.

Around 300 emails later, dozens of meetings, site surveys and a fight with the local council (who tried to hijack our funding), I finally got word today that we now have a live fibre broadband network with 1Gbps internet speed and we individually get to chose our own service providers.

It's been a bit of a journey, frantic at times with telephone calls, emails and meetings. The worst part was the endless months of nothing.
The fight with the local council wasn't too pretty either, fortunately we stuck to our guns or our funding would have ended up supplying with 50mbps fixed wireless broadband.

The 4G signal here is good so my internet service has been a cell phone tethered to my computer for the last 5 years but it's slow and weather dependant for a decent signal.

Today the network was signed off and I now can enjoy 21st Century internet.
The irony is, where I live was where the ambitious Victorians built (at that time) one of the worlds largest and forward thinking public water supplies.

Only 2 more weeks until I'm connected and I'll be needing to find a new reason to fight with Mrs K other than who's turn is it for Netflix (her conference calls trump everything mind you).
In celebration, I'm going to connect 2 computers in every room to stream movies simultaneously for the sheer hell of it.

I'm grateful for the help from two of my neighbours who picked up the slack when my health was at its worst but I'm quite surprised what I managed to achieve from my bed at times when a trip to the kitchen felt like a marathon.

I just thought I'd like to share my feeling of slightly smug satisfaction mixed with utter relief.
I have moved to BT after 20 years with Plusnet, because plusnet did not offer FTTP. The BT engineers came out and despite us living in a housing estate they were unable to feed the fibre to our property because the muppet that built our house had filled the conduit with concrete. After three hours, numerous fibreglass ‘roddings’ and three holes dug in my lawn, they finally ascertained that the concrete cap was only two feet deep, and so (with my permission) they dug out two bricks from our steps, dug out the concrete, and managed to bring the fibre the last meter to the box.

They did a great tidy job to be fair, and we now enjoy 150mbps download and 30 up, which means we can all stream HD quality in all our rooms if we wanted to.

Those are the two bricks they replaced, and the aforementioned conduit has been capped with some foam to avoid debris.

image.jpg
 

Kandinskyesque

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
1,739
Location
Scotland
I have moved to BT after 20 years with Plusnet, because plusnet did not offer FTTP. The BT engineers came out and despite us living in a housing estate they were unable to feed the fibre to our property because the muppet that built our house had filled the conduit with concrete. After three hours, numerous fibreglass ‘roddings’ and three holes dug in my lawn, they finally ascertained that the concrete cap was only two feet deep, and so (with my permission) they dug out two bricks from our steps, dug out the concrete, and managed to bring the fibre the last meter to the box.

They did a great tidy job to be fair, and we now enjoy 150mbps download and 30 up, which means we can all stream HD quality in all our rooms if we wanted to.

Those are the two bricks they replaced, and the aforementioned conduit has been capped with some foam to avoid debris.

View attachment 1034476
Back in the 90s when I worked in local government, I designed the water and sewerage supplies for housing developments.

We'd ask the developers if they would install ducting and service strips, for internet supply to the new houses. It would have cost them buttons to do it, especially during the housebuilding boom but 90% of the time the developers declined.

Given the problems I've seen over the past 20 years with some expensive housing developments like where my sister lives having problems getting internet installed because of short sighted developers; my previously low opinion of housebuilders has only got worse.

It's good to see you managed to get a decent solution, it looks like BT did a tidy job.

My own installation is next month, but the fibre is via overhead cables and will enter my house through the gable into the attic. My house is 200+ years old and Openreach have told me that they're going to be drilling through 1m thick rubble walls.
In my case, I can't blame the housebuilder for short sightedness.
 

Cyberi4n

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Posts
1,233
Age
49
Location
Chester, Uk
Openreach were very good to be fair. Great bunch of lads all of them, and they obviously took pride in their work. Very happy with what they did and how they did it. Whatever issues we may have in the U.K. with BT etc, the grass-roots lads certainly seem a great bunch and very conscientious
 

Hey_you

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Posts
2,116
Location
Colorado USA
I live in a rural county. No wired internet.My only choice was Satellite or a wireless hotspot device. Either is not great. And, I pay a premium price for wireless. Plus, I go over their limit of data, I get throttled down to where dial-up would be a blessing.
A cable company started laying fiber-cable recently in the area. I called em and left my name to be contacted when available. At a Fair, the other weekend, I saw a tent with them and inquired about when I might get hooked up. Probably the end of October!! I can't wait!! 2 gig transfer speed. Hell yeah! I live on the "net" and also game online.
 

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
59,648
Location
Bakersfield
Cable internet here. Then I have a router to supply signal to two televisions and two computers, and two cellphones. The speed is a little over three hundred Mbps. The computers work so fast I don't see how a faster internet would improve their performance for anything we do. Both tv's through their respective test systems receive more than enough signal for streaming in HD. Since I learned where to position the router for the best broadcast area we have no buffering on either tv. The speed on my wife's computer which is hardwired is slightly faster, the only time I see that is running a test.
 

oatsoda

Tele-Holic
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Posts
958
Age
54
Location
The Shack, Nova Scotia
We are rural and our distance from, well some thing, made the dsl slow and unreliable, but it was better than dial up. Then we went to some kind of receiver that looks at a tower, far away, through a lot of trees, etc, and when it worked, we got about 4 whatevers speed. I tnought it was ok, but my kids think its pathetic. So a newer dompany has built a tower on a hill we can actually see out the kitchen wwindow, and they are coming today to put their own receiver on the house, where we are told it should jump the speed upto 25. It will cost about $23 more a month than what we have now.
I know it is still crap compared to what most of the world has, but it might make work tasks easier, and make the kids appreciate dad a little more.
 

uriah1

Telefied
Gold Supporter
Joined
Feb 12, 2011
Posts
27,988
Location
Around
I still have copper cable. The dude said fiber is available from telephone pole, but, the speed would be no greater than 1gig or whatever.
Said if you watched movies the interlace might be quicker or something weird I did not understand. I dont stream movies yet, so I am not
sure.
 

pblanton

TDPRI Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2019
Posts
88
Age
58
Location
Black Forest, Colorado
The dude said fiber is available from telephone pole, but, the speed would be no greater than 1gig or whatever.

Speed no greater than 1gig?!? Beat that guy with a sack of oranges.

Most copper speeds are 10 to 20 Mbps. 1gig is 100 times faster than 10Mbps and fifty times faster than 20Mbps. That's like comparing a '65 beetle to a McLaren and saying, "yeah. The McLaren's ok, but costs more and will only top out at about 290kph or so."

If you are going from copper to fiber, it will change your life; unless you don't really use the internet for much more than checking email, then meh.
 




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