Film Noir ?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by televillian, Apr 5, 2020.

  1. televillian

    televillian Tele-Afflicted

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    anyone else like old B&W whodunits ?
     
  2. Vanzant

    Vanzant Tele-Afflicted

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    Chinatown
    Le Samourai
    Rififi
     
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  3. tubegeek

    tubegeek Tele-Holic

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    The Maltese Falcon
    Ministry Of Fear
    D.O.A.
    Nightmare Alley
     
  4. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    3 of my favorites.
     
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  5. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I'll also point out Psycho is a noir - for the first 40 minutes or so.

    after that, it gives birth to the modern horror movie.
     
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  6. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You bet! Most of Bogie’s filmography.
     
  7. Hey_you

    Hey_you Tele-Meister

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  8. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    blade runner, classic film noir... someday...

    I love Dashiell Hammett...
     
  9. tubegeek

    tubegeek Tele-Holic

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    @thunderbyrd have you read the book "Nightmare Alley"? Even better than the movie.
     
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  10. GibbyTwin

    GibbyTwin Tele-Meister

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    Don't forget:

    Double Indemnity
    The Night of the Hunter
    The Big Sleep

    I'll also add Rear Window - but I'm not sure it is considered film noir.
     
  11. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Noir Alley on TCM every Saturday night.

    Eddie knows his Bums, Babes, and Bullets.
     
  12. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    no! I did not know it was based on a novel. It's going on the list!
     
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  13. tubegeek

    tubegeek Tele-Holic

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  14. Engine Swap

    Engine Swap Tele-Meister

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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2020
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  15. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon" has been on my mind lately, specifically a digression in the book -- not in the film version(s) of "The Maltese Falcon" (the Bogie version is the third screen version) -- known as "The Flitcraft Parable." It's about a man who narrowly avoids being killed by a beam falling from a construction site. He's so unnerved, he decides to abandon his life -- wife, kids, job -- and change everything. Spade is hired to track him down. When he finally finds him, he discovers that he has moved to a new town and taken a new name, but he's got a job, wife and family situation that's virtually identical to the one he had before. "He adjusted himself to beams falling, and then no more of them fell, and he adjusted himself to them not falling." This is what I think about when people ask if life will ever be the same again after this coronavirus thing is all over with.

    I've read a fair amount of Hammett and I like his stuff okay, but it really feels old, with one foot almost stretching back into the 1800s, in a way that Raymond Chander's work doesn't. I've read all of Chandler writings. For noir literature, I also love James Cain and, for relatively more modern authors, Charles Willeford, who can be absolutely brutal. Willeford's most brutal work is "Grimhaven," his unpublished sequel to "Miami Blues," his most successful novel and the first in a series of books that would've stopped at two if "Grimhaven" had been published. My favorite is probably one of his early novels, "The Woman Chaser." The new movie co-starring Mick Jagger, "The Burnt Orange Heresy," is an adaptation of a Willeford novel.
     
  16. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I enjoyed that connection.

    I know a lot of people who remarry after a divorce almost the same person but younger and they 'redo' their families only to discover... it is just 'them'.

    This period can be, for the survivors, a period of reinvention and creation and a great thing. It will probably be a mirror and what we see in it, is what we see of ourselves.
     
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  17. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    As far as film noir... People have mentioned some good ones here. Ones not mentioned that I love...

    "Ace in the Hole" (aka "The Big Carnival"), starring Kirk Douglas. It was Billy Wilder's follow-up to "Sunset Boulevard." When I told Kirk Douglas I had the poster for the movie hanging in my living room, he said, "That movie has balls!"

    "Farewell, My Lovely," starring Robert Mitchum. IMHO, Mitchum is infinitely better as Philip Marlowe than Bogie is. Released in 1975, it's pretty clear that this happened because of "Chinatown," but I love it. They made a semi-sequel with Mitchum in 1978, a new version of "The Big Sleep." It's very faithful to the book, except they updated the setting to modern day England! But that's not its biggest problem. Mitchum is now too old for the part and there's something off with the style and the tone -- it just doesn't work.
     
  18. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Absolutely. It's one of the main reasons we have cable TV.
     
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  19. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    Welllll... not really noir. None of those.
     
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  20. GibbyTwin

    GibbyTwin Tele-Meister

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    Another favorite I just remembered - Witness For The Prosecution.
     
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