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Film Noir, Anyone?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by micpoc, Jun 14, 2010.

  1. micpoc

    micpoc Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    So, I've been holed up in the house for the last few days with a bad knee, with little to do except read, play, and watch old movies, and I've come to the conclusion that if I'm going to fall asleep with the TV on, I'd just as soon there was an old film noir movie showing (hey, it beats infomercials and Cops). Yesterday I watched The Killers from 1946 with Burt Lancaster and, um, Ava Gardner :)grin: :twisted: :D :twisted:); tonight will be the more well-known Double Indemnity.

    Any other fans of these old B&W crime classics out there?
     
  2. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    Yes, please.

    If you haven't seen it, you should check out Billy Wilder's "Ace in the Hole" (1951) starring Kirk Douglas. Very dark and ahead of its time. The same goes for Carol Reed's "The Third Man" (1949), starring Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles.
     
  3. Teleholder

    Teleholder Tele-Meister

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    Love 'em. Double Indemnity is the creme de le cream. Also check out The Big Heat with Glenn Ford and Kiss Me Deadly with a young Cloris Leachman. Good stuff.
     
  4. tboy

    tboy Friend of Leo's

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    Sam Fuller's Pickup on South Street is one of my all-time favorites. Richard Widmark is great in it.

    And +1 on Double Indemnity. All that cheezy gumshoe dialog coming from Fred MacMurray is great. And how ya gonna beat that Stanwyck hairdo?
     
  5. rob2

    rob2 Tele-Holic

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    If you like The Third Man try to find Carol Reeds earlier "Odd Man Out",set in Belfast(thus a kind of Irish Noir)made 1947,James Mason and an amazing supporting cast featuring a lot of Irish Abbey Theatre actors,,some absolute legends such as W.G.Fay,a founder of The Abbey.He would have worked with W.B Yeats,Maud Gonne etc.The leading lady is superb too,Kathleen Ryan,a lady whose own background and career is fascinating in itself...
     
  6. Maxwell Street

    Maxwell Street Friend of Leo's

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    "Chinatown" neo noir

     
  7. Telehackster

    Telehackster Tele-Afflicted

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    I love noir, whether film or novels and short fiction. If you haven't seen it check out Kiss of Death (1947) with Victor Mature and Richard Widmark:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    It's been in my Netflix Instant Viewing queue for awhile, but I haven't had the chance to check it out.

    Ah, yes. It's silly to limit it to B&W post-war crime films. I like the somewhat psychedelic noir "Point Blank" (1967), starring Lee Marvin, and "Night Moves" (1975), starring Gene Hackman. If you dig the '70s L.A. country rock scene, I recommend "Cisco Pike" (1972), starring Kris Kristofferson and Gene Hackman. I also enjoy "Farewell, My Lovely" (1975), starring Robert Mitchum, who, IMHO, made a much better Philip Marlowe than Humphrey Bogart. However, the sequel, a remake of "The Big Sleep," is abominable.





     
  9. crowden

    crowden Tele-Holic

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    :eek: No way dude! Compared to the magic of Bogey and Bacall ("The Big Sleep")? You can't be serious.

    And Bogey as Sam Spade in "The Maltese Falcon" - well, IMO that defines Film Noir.

    But, to each their own I guess.
     
  10. Anchoret

    Anchoret Friend of Leo's

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    I quite liked He Walked By Night, father of Dragnet.

    I downloaded a whole pile of classic noir not long back, including a bunch already mentioned, and found most of them basically unwatchable. :(

    Also check out Kurosawa's tremendously influential '49 Tokyo noir, Stray Dog:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Dave_O

    Dave_O Friend of Leo's

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    I'm with you on that one. One of my all-time favourite films.
     
  12. micpoc

    micpoc Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Skully: Ace in the Hole is one I've heard about but have never seen; I think it's part of the Criterion Collection now. Thanks for the heads up. The Third Man is an old favorite.

    Teleholder: Kiss Me Deadly is a great one too, and quite out there for noir. It's certainly a long way from Phyllis.

    tboy: haven't seen the Sam Fuller you mentioned, but I've seen others, and he's a natural for noir.

    rob2: Odd Man Out draws a complete blank from me, though I've seen some of Reed's stuff; thanks for the lead.

    Telehackster: funny you mention Kiss of Death, as that's one I recalled seeing years ago but could never place by title or actor; that image brought it right back. Thanks.

    All the talk about neo-noir - of which Chinatown is the obvious crown champ, IMHO - makes me think of Sin City, which many might exclude for its brutality, but to me, is an obvious touchstone for modern noir.

    And, of course, I would be remiss to not mention one of the key films in the development of my love affair with noir: 1982's Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid:



    And this one is ripped from the film I watched yesterday, The Killers:

     
  13. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Sunset Boulevard



    Gloria Swanson, William Holden, and the Absent-Minded Professor's main squeeze.

    It's a good 'un.
     
  14. Squier Buyer

    Squier Buyer Tele-Meister

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    One of the last and best. 1958. Known for it's long one camera first seen and hilarious "biker" scene where they try to get Janet Leigh to smoke "reefer" :lol: Superbly written, acted and directed by Orson Wells. Also Charlton Heston stars as a Mexican?
     

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  15. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My wife and I just watched both of these, back-to-back, and we thoroughly enjoyed them.
     
  16. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    "A Touch of Evil" is good. Probably really good.

    Welles was stuck on himself a bit much when he made it.

    Dennis Weaver is just plain creepy.

    Charlton Heston? As Vargas he was miscast. I could see John Wayne in that role. Heston though...

    That opening pan/crane shot! Boy howdy? Longest one in history! It is worth watching just to see that. I think it goes downhill rapidly when that shot is over.

    Tom Russell wrote a song (Touch of Evil) about it.

    I enjoy the song more than the movie.

    But everybody knows that my taste is suspect. :eek:
     
  17. Maxwell Street

    Maxwell Street Friend of Leo's

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    "The Night of the Hunter"

     
  18. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    I don't know if that is true noir.

    But Mitchum is certainly at his creepiest.

    That's for sure.

    That's for danged sure!
     
  19. Maxwell Street

    Maxwell Street Friend of Leo's

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    creep city! has the influence/look of german expressionist cinematography...shadows, weird angles etc., not a detective/city movie but def classified as film noir.....some say it isn't but that's kind of splitting hairs like alder vs. ash....oops....sorry....
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  20. Skully

    Skully Doctor of Teleocity

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    I'm not a big fan of Howard Hawks' version of "The Big Sleep" with Bogey & Bacall. If you've read Chandler's books, you know Bogart is physically wrong for the part (Marlowe is a big guy; Bogart is small and scrawny), and he's a star by this point, so there's some ridiculous Hollywood movie stuff, like when the cute lady cab driver flirts with him. His gay routine in the book store is also quite painful. And it's maddening that, with real Los Angeles there at their disposal, the film is a total backlot job. Many of the noirs from the '40s and '50s were actually shot on location, largely because they were so low budget. It's a good example of a limitation turning into a strength.

    I think this is a much better film, although it's a bit stiff and talky. IIRC, it's also very faithful to the book.
     
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