Filling holes for neck screws

Super Locrian

Tele-Meister
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Posts
163
Location
Up North
This is not my guitar, but I have a similar arrangement with the neck screws recessed.

The recess was not done properly on two of the holes, so that there is a gap between the washer/ring for the neck screw, and the wood.

It's a beater guitar, so I'm not too concerned about aesthetics. But I want to fill the holes with *something* and cover the repair with a standard neck plate. The filling is mainly to prevent moisture and dust to get into the holes.

So my question is, what should I fill the holes with? Doesn't have to provide structural strength, doesn't have to look nice since it will be covered. I thougth about some kind of gel-like glue, but maybe there are better options?

latest
 

Super Locrian

Tele-Meister
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Posts
163
Location
Up North
I have found some resin epoxy wood filler, it has a lot of health warnings attached, but I would be using very small quantities. It's like a cheese sausage with the hardening component being the "cheese".

epoxy.jpg
 

Sea Devil

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 23, 2006
Posts
3,486
Age
59
Location
Brooklyn, NY
If that's JB Weld KwikWood, I've used it and it performs very well in every way -- fast dry time, sets up rock-hard with no bubbles, maintains its bond for a couple decades at least, seemingly moving with the wood while (paradoxically?) never expanding or contracting, resists moisture, sands easily, and clean-up is a breeze with mineral spirits, alcohol, or soap and water.

"KwikWood™ is a hand-mixable epoxy putty, formulated to repair and rebuild wood. After mixing, it cures to the same density as wood and becomes an integral part of the repair. For use on exterior or interior applications, it contains no solvents, will not rot, shrink, crack or pull away. KwikWood™ has a 15-25 minute work life. After 60 minutes, it can be machined, drilled, tapped, sanded, filed and painted. Stronger than wood, KwikWood™ dries to a light tan color."
 

telemnemonics

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2010
Posts
33,909
Age
62
Location
Maine
You really needbto show pics of the damage when asking how to repair or patch wood.

The sample is so far from being applicable.
Moisture?
Silicone caulk!
 

schmee

Telefied
Silver Supporter
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Posts
20,672
Location
northwest
? I'm not sure the problem? Cant you just use shorter screws if it's not tightening fully? Cut and grind some length off that screw or just add another washer under the screw head.
Where will you get a neck plate that shape?
If you must fill those use something solid and not compressible. Maybe Hardwood Dowel cut to length and drilled through the center. Plastic bushings from the hardware store?
 

Old Verle Miller

Tele-Meister
Joined
Apr 7, 2022
Posts
347
Location
Texas
I don't think you'll find a "standard" neck plate for that but you could have one made and chrome plated; it would be pretty expensive.

As noted before, KwikWood is suitable. I don't recommend dowels because you're attempting to introduce a pretty-firm cross-grain situation for a screw to stay lined up in. A paste has no inherent grain.
 

Sea Devil

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 23, 2006
Posts
3,486
Age
59
Location
Brooklyn, NY
So that's not your guitar. Good! It's not flat where the holes for the neck screws are. I hope your guitar is flat there, or your proposed solution -- a flat "standard" neck plate, albeit perhaps one with custom holes -- won't work.

The KwikWood is incredibly strong. If the problem is that the holes are imperfect, why not just use a small amount to even out the unseen part under the screw head so that it's seated better? A countersink attachment for a drill or dremel might work to get it the right shape if you apply too much.

Or, as sorta suggested above, you could just go a little deeper, maybe using a shorter screw to compensate.
 

Beebe

Tele-Holic
Joined
Jun 1, 2021
Posts
693
Location
Atlanta
Hole repairs are often done with a hardwood dowel and wood glue.

If you can't find an exact fit, get a dowel slightly larger than the hole and use a drill bit the same size as the dowel to enlarge the hole. Sand the dowel diameter slightly if needed, but you want a snug fit.

Cut the dowel close to final length and after glued in place, pair it down flush with a pairing knife or chisel. Sand it smooth and flush. Drill new holes where you need them, and finish as desired.
 




Top