fender recommended spec

Discussion in 'Fender Custom Shop Tele Forum' started by vishnu, Jul 25, 2018.

  1. vishnu

    vishnu Tele-Meister

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    Can you peeps get yer 52 CS Teles down to 2/32 both sides without buzzin'?

    the 2/32s action just happen to suit me but getting it clean ( 2016 guitar with no fret work) at this setting is hard work...could a simple fret sitting too proud be the cause of multiple buzzes?

    it's mostly g string cowboy chord area ( relief is between .08 & .10)
     
  2. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Does the buzz come through the amp? I've learned to put up with minimal buzz unplugged so long as it doesn't come through the amp, if it gets me the action I want.
     
    Piggy Stu likes this.
  3. vishnu

    vishnu Tele-Meister

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    just bugs me though not through amp

    I was more interested if folks here could actually achieve Fender recommended specs without buzzin'......
     
  4. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Ah, well, I'd venture a guess that most of us experience some buzz at whatever or ideal setup is, but live with it as it doesn't come through the amp.

    Speaking for myself, I have gotten to such specs (or more importantly, the specs that get me what I want, which tends not to be too far off*) both with and without buzz, in different cases. Even the same guitar can behave slightly differently on different days, or under different conditions.

    I suppose one fret could be causing your problem. Lots of folks here use a credit card or some other straight edge and lay it across three frets at a time, rocking it back and forth to determine if the middle fret is sitting too high or low.

    Your relief may also be a bit low? I believe the recommended spec there is 0.10, so if yours is lower than that, that may also contribute to buzz.

    *Some people here seem a little disdainful of factory recommended specs. I agree that you should play with your setup to see what suits you best, but you have to start somewhere, so I like to set everything to factory spec and play with it form there.
     
  5. vishnu

    vishnu Tele-Meister

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    the 3 fret rule......that would be frets 123, 234....345....456 and so on?
     
  6. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    That's right. This will let you figure out if the middle fret of the 3 is higher than the other two, or if either of the outer frets is lower than the middle one. So say you're checking frets 1-2-3. Lay the straight edge across the frets in the same direction the strings go, and try to rock the card (or whatever) back and forth (i.e. nut-ward to bridge-ward). If it won't move, then the frets are even with each other (at least in that spot; you should try this at multiple points from the bass to treble side of the neck). If it does move, than either the 2nd fret is too high, or the 1st/3rd is too low. Do this all the way up the neck to get an idea of how your frets lay.
     
  7. vishnu

    vishnu Tele-Meister

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    many thanks :)
     
  8. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Although the "fret rocker" is a very nicely made tool (available from Stew Mac and from Antique Electronic Supply) you can use the beam from a machinist's or carpenter's combination square. Turns out that the three flat surfaces, if you slide it off of the ruler, are a convenient length for bridging across three frets at a time. Use a Sharpie to mark where you see a high fret and you'll have an idea of how much dressing needs to be done for a level-and-crown. Be careful removing the sharpie because alcohol can affect nitro lacquer (in which case naptha/lighter fluid is safer). Also check carefully with any high fret to see if there isn't a gap opening up under it. A lacquer dam on a maple neck can make this difficult to determine, but on an unfinished rosewood board you can detect lifted frets by sneaking a thin feeler gauge alongside the fret.

    Some people recommend setting the relief to a known starting point, then lowering the action until it just starts to buzz, and then tweaking the trussrod to see if you can clear out the fret buzz - too many variables for me to keep track of that way, but what results have you had with that approach?

    And I don't see why your 2/32 target is in any way unrealistic. I'm happy if I can get the action down to 3/64 treble and 4/64 (or your 2/32) on the bass side at the 12th fret without any capo.
     
  9. vishnu

    vishnu Tele-Meister

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    thanks all :)
     
  10. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    I think where it gets weird is Fender specs these values at the 17th fret which ends up being a lot lower than if you measure at the 12th.

    I have my MIM set to what you are setting yours up at, 3/64th on the treble side and 4/64th on the bass side measured at the 12th without a Capo. I have some buzz in the middle of the neck if I play too hard but it won't come through the amp if it's loud enough. This was recommended to me by a local luthier. (Mine has not had any fret work, it might actually need some)

    But Fender says to measure at the 17th!
     
  11. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'll never understand why Fender says to use a capo and measure at the 17th, but I have a theory. The rest of the world talks about action measured on an open string at the 12th fret, for instance Dan Erlewine's How to Make Your Electric Guitar Play Great has a chart of actions from real-life favorite guitars of famous musicians. So maybe they don't want you comparing your guitar to what everyone else can achieve? Maybe they're skipping over the part where a good setup starts with the nut slots and all their production line guitars leave the factory with high nut slots? (not a criticism, it has to be done that way for any major level of production, and the Custom Shop models do get a final tweak before delivery).
     
  12. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    Fender's instructions actually don't say to capo at the first fret and then measure at the 17th:

    Do you know for sure if the Custom shop models get hand adjusted nuts? I haven't seen too many custom shop guitars but the few I've seen look like they did have more work done.

    The only one I've really seen much was my teacher's, it's some form of custom shop Nocaster, and it clearly has a much better setup than run of the mill Telecasters I've seen.. but he bought it used so he couldn't say for sure who had adjusted the nut.

    I also got to play a Nash last year, that definitely had a hand adjusted nut. Nearly perfect setup out of the box with no rattle anywhere on the neck. Too bad it was a heavy relic.

    I bought nut files and adjusted my MIM myself and it made a huge difference. It came out just about perfect.
     
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