Fender neck myths debunked - The Actual Terminology Of Fender's Guitar Neck Lingo

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by moonman2, Oct 18, 2020 at 6:45 PM.

  1. moonman2

    moonman2 Tele-Meister

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  2. dlaroe

    dlaroe Tele-Meister

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    Make mine a #1, D, 9.5", 21 please!

    Nice reference, on the one have it's kinda strange Fender's nomenclature isn't really how most of us describe necks. On the other hand they don't use it in their sales literature.
     
  3. pi

    pi Tele-Meister

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  4. Veitchy

    Veitchy Tele-Afflicted

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    I would love it if they used this numbering convention (and perhaps stuck to the archetypes). I was in a guitar store the other day and played three different guitars that are listed as having 'Modern C' necks (not my favorite profile, but they were there...) All three had different feeling necks. I understand that a machined product that's hand finished will have some variance, but the difference was still startling.
     
  5. Goldenshellback

    Goldenshellback Tele-Meister

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    Back in the sixties and seventies I and my friends classified necks in three categories. Heavy neck, skinny neck, and good neck. We didn’t use the terms described in the article.
     
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  6. loopfinding

    loopfinding Tele-Meister

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    yeah i have seen them throw around "C" with necks varying by as much as .05-.09" on paper, nevermind the actual real life measurement. and it doesn't appear to be consistent with "modern C," or "classic C" either. i guess to their credit lately they've been calling some "deep C" now, which i guess is a more appropriate description of the average jazzmaster neck, but they really should have more standardized designations.
     
  7. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

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    Ha! That only works for custom shop guitars.

    I bought a "Fat U" PV 2017 '52 Tele brand new, it was a slim C about .82 to.90 at best. I said, **** that, returned it and got a "Fat C" 2017 '56 Strat, it was also a slim C even smaller than the fat U!

    Meanwhile my 1972 "heavy" Tele with the "skinny" neck is actually... a Fat U about .92-1.0 and it weighs in at a whopping 7.5 pounds.


    All bets are off in the production guitars. My CS Strat is spot on to the description in the 50 pages of literature it came with, ya pay the big bucks.
     
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  8. Duncan

    Duncan Tele-Meister

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    Not mentioned is the 10/56 neck. Sometimes referred to as a boat neck. It has a pronounced V and transitions into a big U shape in the higher frets. I don't think it's ever been offered by US production, but it was wildly popular for a lot of Custom Shop customers.

    You'll never hear the terms "nitro" or "poly" at Fender..
     
  9. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    archetype, here, agreeing that Fender should stick to the archetypes.
     
  10. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Shapes can be described/visually represented.

    Neck Widths and Neck depths can only be measured .

    “Chunky” and “slim” mean nothing.
     
  11. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I actually knocked back a 62 Telecaster, bound edges et. al. from professional guitarist because that guitar had a more 50s style neck and I knew I'd hate it and sell it. He was only asking $650 AUD for it.
    I see the neck as one of the most important features in a guitar.
     
  12. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Poster Extraordinaire

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    I’m no expert but I think that’s pretty limited and outdated.
    There are 14 neck profiles listed in the custom shop design guide, all of which appear in one Fender model or another.
     
  13. ricardo1912

    ricardo1912 Tele-Afflicted

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    I really wish guitar makers would give the important neck details. The depth front to back at the 1st and 12th frets, the nut width and the kind of shoulder.

    For me these are the crucial bits and it wouldn't be hard. Given there is a degree of hand finishing it would have to be within a range but it would be really useful.
     
  14. blue metalflake

    blue metalflake Doctor of Teleocity

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    712385EF-0CF0-4F8E-B0B5-BE637611FAB4.jpeg I found this years back and copied it. I think the hatched portion represented the first fret size.
    No idea where this came from - memory gone
     
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