Fender 75, any info on these?

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by J. Hayes, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. J. Hayes

    J. Hayes Friend of Leo's

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    I just traded an Epiphone Masterbilt acoustic guitar w/case for two amps. I only paid $499 plus tax for the Epi.... I think this might be a great deal as one of the amps is a Fender 75 and the other is a Peavey TKO 60 bass amp w/ a 15" speaker.........

    The Fender 75 is an all tube combo amp with channel switching and a 12" speaker. I have it plugged up in the garage and it sounds pretty good. Does anyone know anything about these amps? It has the Fender speaker with the blue sticker on it, also someone wrote "steel blade" on the back of the speaker with a marking pen anyone know what that's about? A friend of mine told me he's seen one before and heard that Fender had made them when the little Mesa Boogies came out to try to compete with those but I don't know, any thoughts?...........JH in Va.
     

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  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I had, and enjoyed having both the 12 and 15 inch speaker models of this amp.
    I believe they are from the "Paul Rivera" era of Fender amps.
    They were kinda Mesa Boogie like, and sounded great clean and driven.
    Chris Duarte used to use them.
    You made a good trade, IMO!
     
  3. J. Hayes

    J. Hayes Friend of Leo's

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    Hey brookdalebill........

    Do you have any idea when these amps were made?.....JH in Va.
     
  4. TaylorPlayer

    TaylorPlayer Tele-Afflicted

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    The first Used tube amp I purchased from Craigslist several years ago was a Fender 75. They were the last of the Rivera amps and may have been the first of his non- point to point wiring? (Sorry I can't remember if it was PTP or not.) I just remember thinking "Holy Crap this thing is loud!". I ended up trading that amp for a nice 12 string acoustic Ovation LX series guitar, but I didn't know crap about amps at that point. I want to say it was likely built in the 1970's or early 80's. Kid I traded it to was happy as a clam though. He was joining a punk band and the sound was right up his alley. :D
     
  5. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Jerry, those amps were built in '80-'82, IIRC. The 30, 75 and 140 preceeded the amps that I consider to be the Rivera/Jahns era amps....the Champ II, Super Champ, Princeton Rev II, DRII, concert II and the TRII....which debutted in 1982. I don't know if Paul Rivera had anything to do with the 30/75/140 series or not. Rivera was a consultant on that later series that was built in 82-'85. The 30/75/140 Series was indeed handwired as was the later 'II' Series. (FEnder hasn't built a PTP amp since 1949, fwiw.) Good trade, imho. That speaker is either an EMinence or a Pyle, I would guess. IF there is a grey sticker on the side of the magnet, it is an Eminence. IF it is a Pyle, the code may be hidden underneath that label. The Pyle code is '1098' with dates afterward.
     
  6. J. Hayes

    J. Hayes Friend of Leo's

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    Hey Wally.........

    Thanks for the info... I took it out to the gig last night and gave it the ultimate test of just plugging straight into it without my effects board and I was very happy with the sound. The gig was a classic country thing and used my main Tele and this thing really sounded good on the Haggard tunes with a nice Roy Nichols tone..........JH in Va.
     
  7. BiggerJohn

    BiggerJohn Friend of Leo's

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    As i recall, the 75 was Fender's response to the early Boogies. Careful, it's an ultralinear, and can sound pretty stiff.
     
  8. Warm Gums

    Warm Gums Friend of Leo's

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    These were designed before Rivera was involved..
    They take a lot of stick because of that, and the ultra liners etc. but Jahns was a old school designer, primarily interested in cleans, it was a little outside his orbit that someone would want distortion built in to a amp. Given that I think they are a great choice for some one who primary wants cleans with a bit of unique od on the odd occasion. Most people who worked with him said he was incredibly knowledgeable, took great pride in his work and designed his amps to last two lifetimes. I consider these to be real sleepers, some day some young buck is going to shop up with one, ala Derick Trucks and his Pyle equipped SR, and then they will be the coolest thing going.
     
  9. jkats

    jkats Tele-Meister

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    I had heard that Ed Jahns was a rocket scientist (literally) for NASA who joined Fender R&D and designed the 30 and 75 series of amps. The 75 is an interesting and underrated (and very heavy) amp that requires the original footswitch to make it operate well in the clean mode. If it's missing, there is a Fender Princeton II website that contains a schematic so you can build your own.
     
  10. Neill Levine

    Neill Levine Tele-Meister

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    A monstrous amp. I have just put mine on consignment because I realised it was way too heavy and far too loud for me to ever practically use again. My DRRI fills my practical needs.
    If you need to play LOUD and want a combo - you can't go past the 75.
    (but don't use the OD channel - it is truly awful - use your pedals)

    Here it is on-stage at the Petersham Town Hall in Sydney. And that is a big room.

    NL

    ps

    The low power switch limits the amp to 15 watts, the theory being that it breaks up earlier.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  11. Alamo

    Alamo Doctor of Teleocity

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    Thats a nice amp and good trade.
    it has some cool features that I'm diggin'

    Watts: 15 (Lo) or 75 (Hi) Watts <-- is that the switch between mains and standby?

    Bright Switch, Volume (clean), Treble with pull-knob boost, Middle with pull-knob boost, Bass with pull-knob boost, Lead Drive, Reverb, Lead Level, and Master Volume.

    http://ampwares.com/amplifiers/fender-75/
     
  12. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    WarmGuns, thanks for that info. I had never considered anything from Fender as 'Rivera- era' except for the II Series that followed these 30/75/140 amps. In the last 6 months or so there has been a growing 'rumor' on this forum that anything built in the early '80's is 'River-era'.....even the solid state stuff.
    RE: ultralinear amps. Imight agree that IF a person is looking to utilize power tube distortion that this UL arrangement might not be their cup of tea. However, there is nothing to say that a UL amp cannot provide some players with what they want to hear. I have a csutomer who bought a pristine 135-watt SFTR, brought it to me, and told me to do what I would do to it if ti were mine. When I was through, he had a very versatile amp with great sonics. The Doobie Bros Band tried to buy it after they used it as part of a rented backline in ABilene, TX. IT was adn still is big and bad to the bone.
     
  13. Warm Gums

    Warm Gums Friend of Leo's

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    I think it's important to realize exactly what Riverias role at Fender was;he was more of a consultant, than a designer.

    The II series was his idea, and he had some basic schematics drawn up, but Jahns did the final designs, as far as the ss stuff, it's true that Rivera did consult on things like the London's and Sidekicks, so it is not untruthful to say they are "Rivera era" I just don't think there was any thing special about them...then again I'm not a huge fan of the II series either.
    The 75 is cool because it's reasonably priced for what it is. The Sidekick amps are weak sauce compared to the Peaveys of the same era, which are much less expensive second hand, and for about the same $ as a II series you could buy an equivlent used Rivera , and have a more flexible amp.
     
  14. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    WarmGuns, yes, Paul Rivera educated me on his consultant role at FEnder one day over the phone.
    I happen to like the II series....I like ;the four smallest amps better than the Concert and the Twin II. I also like the Rivera amps a great deal. I like the construction of the Fender II series better than the Rivera amps' PCB board construction...with pots and jacks on the main board. However, the II Series FEnders are in a world of their own in that regard....handwired switching amps with reverb. Not many of those around at the prices that one can get a II-series amp for, are there?
    Imho, the Rivera amp line is an under-rated modern amp. The prices seem to have been going up on them lately, haven't they? Very versatile amps..maybe the most verstaile amp that I have owned or played on. I had a Rivera Chris Duarte ...1X 15", 4X EL-34's....that yielded 10 levels of gain when the 5-button footswtich assemble was used to the fullest. A Rivera Fandango has 6-levels of gain available with the 3-button footswitch.
     
  15. Chris S.

    Chris S. Asst. Admin

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    I had a Fender 75 1x12 for almost twenty years. The clean tones were quite good; as mentioned above, the overdrive channel was awful. The amp also has pull-boost controls for T-M-B, those should pretty much be avoided. The speaker in mine had a magnet the size of dinner plate. The amp weighed as much as a Volkswagen. :rolleyes:

    It was always good for entertainment value, though, especially watching someone try to pick up something the size of a Princeton only to discover it had apparently been nailed to the floor... :D CS
     
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  16. Telecastoff1

    Telecastoff1 Tele-Holic

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    I own a Fender 75 1x15. It's one of the most under-rated Fender amps I have ever come across in my 50+ years of playing thru Fender amps. Ed Jahns really built the ultimate, versatile Fender amp with these. This amp has soul that you can feel right down to the bone. Not many amps do that to me. This particular amp does...every time!
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2018
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  17. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    Nope. Rivera actually hated these.
    Anyhow. I have one. Yours is a late model. Mines is all black with drip edge and and EVM that I replaced with a Celestion cream back ( for weight).
    Hell of a score.
     
  18. Bendyha

    Bendyha Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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