Fellow friends-of-pollinators, you'll want to see 'My Garden of a Thousand Bees' on PBS (US)

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by buster poser, Oct 21, 2021.

  1. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,960
    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Location:
    Tewa Land NM
    Nature photo-/videographer with serious chops (has worked with Attenborough) sets his lenses on his own garden in Bristol, and the wild bees that inhabit it. Camera and soundwork are incredible, but the content is absolutely tremendous and I learned a ton.

    https://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/my-garden-thousand-bees-about/26263/

    Trailer and a clip:



     
  2. dented

    dented Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    13,442
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    Location:
    Lake Lanier, Georgia
    Wow, cool stuff and great camera. Thanks!
     
    OmegaWoods and buster poser like this.
  3. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,268
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2020
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Nice, thanks for posting this.
    We were always saying we should plant some bee/pollinator friendly plants in back, but never got to it. This year I was happy to see honey bees visiting a big hydrangea we planted years ago outside the kitchen window, and they kept coming for a few months. So they're around, at least (central NC).
     
    OmegaWoods, dented and buster poser like this.
  4. Fretting out

    Fretting out Doctor of Teleocity Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    30
    Posts:
    10,434
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2019
    Location:
    Land of Mary
    Makes me sad...

    Never see bees around here anymore...

    When I was a kid you couldn’t walk barefoot in the yard without danger of stepping on one in the clover.....

    Now you’re lucky if you see a dozen throughout the whole summer
     
    Toadtele, Boreas, OmegaWoods and 3 others like this.
  5. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,103
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2011
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    My wife and I watched it last night. We really enjoyed it. Great filming, interesting subject matter. We learned a lot. Highly recommended.
     
    OmegaWoods and buster poser like this.
  6. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,960
    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Location:
    Tewa Land NM
    They say development and killing/mowing wildflowers on the sides of roads etc are big culprits, but there's a lot of data showing they can return and do just fine in 'urban' gardens, like this guy observed anecdotally.

    I'm a complete noob to the whole thing, but we have a much different garden situation here in the southwest and I've taken a big interest in helping out the little guys since we got here. Places like Bee City USA and the Xerces society (foundation?) are pretty helpful, the latter will give you free plants I think. At least up here, the flowers they like are plentiful/cheap, pretty, and require little maintenance.

    All my winter projects this year will be around making our tiny little plot even more bee-friendly with a couple of little houses at least. Just planted some early blooming bulbs that are supposed to help the species who 'wake up' earlier in spring.
     
  7. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    29,784
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    We have many species of bees up here (including one non-native:oops:). I get to observe them every morning during the spring and summer months as I weed the vegetable garden. Quite fascinating. Thanks for posting the vids.
     
    OmegaWoods likes this.
  8. OmegaWoods

    OmegaWoods Tele-Holic

    Age:
    54
    Posts:
    840
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2020
    Location:
    East TN, USA
    Thanks for sharing. Our local bee population has improved this year. We keep planting flowers for them and they keep coming around so my plan to help the locals seems to be working!
     
    buster poser likes this.
  9. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    4,870
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Location:
    NY
    +1, we saw it too, am in complete agreement with @buster poser-fascinating.
     
    buster poser likes this.
  10. HotRodSteve

    HotRodSteve Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,622
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Location:
    The Shmudson Valley
    The house I bought last year has a ton of different flowers, the bees seem to like the place.
     
    buster poser likes this.
  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    30,450
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    Will watch later, love those little pollen luggers!
    Right now my home and work flower gardens are starting to really die off and we get a coastal frost in a few days.
    Sad time of the year for that.
     
    buster poser likes this.
  12. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,127
    Joined:
    May 8, 2019
    Location:
    The back of Bill's mothers'
    Marvellous!

    Lots and lots of honeybees here - they often get in the house and we spend time escorting them off the premises. They are non-native though - yet another 'import' that has consequences for the indigenous species (competition for food, diseases, mites, etc.)

    We do have 20-odd native species, they don't produce honey in hives, but are crucial pollinators for many indigenous plants. They are quite solitary, with one family living in a nest in the ground rather than in hives. They tend to be smaller than other bees and dark in colour.

    Bee hives (well, the honey in them) are nationally a very big business here. I know a few bee-keepers, it's a fairly common profession here.
     
    buster poser likes this.
  13. dkmw

    dkmw Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    5,792
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Location:
    Florida USA
    I have tomatillos started for the fall garden, if it’s anything like last springs crop I’ll be up to my ears in bees in a month or two. Of all the vegetables I’ve grown, they attract the largest number of bees.
     
    buster poser likes this.
  14. Telecaster88

    Telecaster88 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    53
    Posts:
    1,409
    Joined:
    May 9, 2019
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Thanks for the notice... The wife and I just watched it.

    We have an anise hyssop in our backyard that has grown like crazy. The bees love it. We'll have like thirty-plus bees on it at any given time towards the end of summer.
     
  15. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    30,450
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    Maine
    At work I cultivate a big beebalm patch that draws bees, hummingbirds and butterflies, plus a huge amount of other flowering plants and shrubs including several butterfly bushes that get over seven feet in a good year and have flower heads as big as a longneck beer bottle.
    Deadheading I'm careful but I'll accidentally grab a bee a few times a season, usually get a tiny sting.
    Tough where we have to work so closely together!
    At home I've managed to grow a modest amount of beebalm, no luck with butterfly bushes since one made more than eight feet, lots of liatris that does great and bees love, and a slew of other flowers I forget the names of.
    I used to only grow food for the belly but found that food for the soul is just as important.
    Seems like malnourished soul times, and I think cultivating beauty in flora and fauna is a form of martial arts.
     
    buster poser and Manual Slim like this.
  16. tintag27

    tintag27 Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,848
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Location:
    Old England
    Thanks for posting - I hope this comes to UK television soon! I've been watching bees, and all manner of bugs and creepy crawlies for many years. They are fascinating to study and photograph, but sadly most people never see most of the tiny wonders all around them... or, worse still - try to kill them.
    In the UK we have about 24 species of Bumblebees plus the common Honey bee, and many other kinds, including Mining Bees, and parasitic Bees which prey on other Bees! But some 'Bees' are not even Bees! Many species of Hoverflies have evolved to mimic Bumblebees...
    Here are a few of my own favourites that may be new to Bee watchers... Respect the Bee!

    Tree Bumblebees only reached the UK in 2001 but are now seen all over the country
    Tree BB.jpg

    A Tawny Mining Bee queen - they dig holes in sandy paths and lawns - so watch where you walk
    Tawny.jpg

    This is not even a real Bee - a bee-mimic Hoverfly!
    Not a B.jpg

    Another Mining Bee - I nearly sat on this little bee on a churchyard bench, so watch where you sit!
    Andrena.jpg
     
    telemnemonics and buster poser like this.
  17. ponce

    ponce Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    42
    Posts:
    1,428
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    Location:
    Croatia
    I see a lot of beehives around here in Croatia and I always wondered how many registered beekeepers actually are here. According to the beekeper association, there are around 8000 people who work in that field, with 415 000 bee communities and a yearly production of 8000 tons. Is that a lot for a total population of cca. 4 000 000 people? It must be some money in it, I guess.
     
    tintag27 and buster poser like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.