Favourite photographers?

Engine Swap

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O. Winston Link

jacksonfineart-o.-winston-link-hot-shot-eastbound-at-the-drive-in-iaeger-west-virginia-1956.jpg


He devised special equipment for night photography

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buster poser

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I like street photography.

Vivian Maier was unknown and unpublished, but after her death over 150,000 of her pictures were discovered. I saw a very interesting doc about her a few years ago.
Very similar to Gedney. Caught a retrospective on him in the late 90s at SF MoMA, bought the monograph. His archives (at Duke) are linked below too:


 

telemnemonics

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I like Weegee too. But isn't this an anonymous crime scene photo from Evidence by Luc Sante?

EDIT Yeah, I just looked at my photo books. That photo was taken by the NYPD, not Weegee.
Good call, I had that book and know the photo well but take pictures because I have ADHD and cannot process or recall very well, or I recall odd bits of a scene but never names.
My Mother was actually in a Weegee book and I've seen the NYC nightclub scene in the book but could never find it for sale.

Interestingly, huge piles of glass negatives shot at crime scenes for the NYPD were dumped in the East River because nobody could think of a better idea.
When I was a junkie I was down by the river one day and found a giant binder full of NYPD mug shots, all polaroid. Hundreds of them, fascinating and I really wanted the book but was always running from the cops at that time and the binder was gigantic, maybe 6" thick.
Stashed it and never went back.
It was the abandoned factories area along Kent ave where they used to line up the stolen cars for stripping.
I used to take pics of guys cutting up cars with my M3, sometimes they'd yell at me but mostly the camera and white boy was ignored. Not Winogrand IYF though!
He wasn't shooting folks who would shoot back!
 

telemnemonics

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I like street photography.

Vivian Maier was unknown and unpublished, but after her death over 150,000 of her pictures were discovered. I saw a very interesting doc about her a few years ago.
Right that's a name I was trying to recall and posted that a new photog had been discovered.
Got a DVD about her.
I love love love NYC and sometimes think it's cheap to take pics of stuff people would look at no matter who took the pic or how well they took it.
But while NY, Chicago etc "back then" is engrossing to the viewer, some shooters capture more than what the passer by would see.

I think the photographer who is constantly shooting is really trying to work through their own internal conflicts, and that's what makes their pics more interesting than just the captured subject. Not that we can see what internal conflicts drove them.
 

Greggorios

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Apparently, Vivian Maier also worked in 8mm film. She is (was) totally unknown to me, so this is a great TDPRI day for me, learning about something new. Here's a trailer for the documentary about her.

A big part of her story is about the man who "discovered" her and her work after she died. Really an inspiring story in and of itself.
 

bdkphoto

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I can only support all of the photographers mentioned, perhaps add David Bailey for fashion and inspiring a film by Antonioni......
but possibly my most influential artist is one @bdkphoto listed, Duane Michels. He doesn't just capture a moment, he often uses sequences to tell a story, and sometimes writes directly on the image. He even inspired me to buy a vintage camera like he uses, an Argus C3. It has a separate "shutter cocking" from the film advance, making it easier to make multiple exposures on the same frame of film. He also often uses camera movement and slow shutter speeds to blur his images. Very dream-like and surreal.
I got to know Duane a bit, one of my assistants went on to work with him for many years. He is a character, boundless energy, and very funny. Reminded me of Robin Williams in many ways - he certainly told you what he thought. He spoke very simply about writing on his images - he wanted you (the viewer) to know exactly what he was thinking. He has to be close to 90 now.
 

Mike M

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Were you shooting or editing back then, either way I'm guessing we have many friends/collegues in common. I was in DC back in those days but worked for a bunch of NY based magazines.

Editing and selling from the office.

You spoke of Contact Press, I remember Jeffrey Smith back in the day.
 

pixeljammer

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I think the photographer who is constantly shooting is really trying to work through their own internal conflicts, and that's what makes their pics more interesting than just the captured subject. Not that we can see what internal conflicts drove them.

I think this is true of some, but by no means all constantly-shooting photographers. Art is made for all sorts of reasons.
 

pixeljammer

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And regarding C.B.,
He always composed the shot with no cropping, insisting on the prints showing the edges of the negative. That always impressed me, that he didn't rely on cropping later to get a good composition.
Something very pure about shooting with a simple Leica, prime lens and using your feet to get in position for the best shot. In this day of photoshop and post processing effects where you can't trust the reality of what you're seeing in the image.

That's what he claimed in public, most of the time, but I seem to remember that it wasn't quite true. In fact, his most-famous image, the one of the puddle-jumper, is cropped in post.

As far as trusting what you see in past photos, well, you really can't. Photographer's position and a lense's angle of view can tell a lie, and darkroom and scene manipulation started as soon as photography did.


Fineman has a decent overview of the subject:
 
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