Faux "ebony" binding?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by blackbelt308, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. blackbelt308

    blackbelt308 Tele-Holic

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    OK, looking for some ideas here...

    Having successfully created faux wood binding on several builds including this spalted maple top beauty, I have another idea in mind. Possibly a stupid idea! :)

    [​IMG]

    For a new build, which will have a bookmatched Ambrosia maple top over mahogany - and no burst - I want to create the appearance of ebony binding on the edge of the maple top. That would give me a black line of contrast between the slightly amber top and the Heritage cherry finish of the mahogany.

    Has anyone tried something like this? Thinking I could accomplish it with lots of careful masking and spraying black-tinted lacquer on the edge, but there may be a more elegant approach.

    Thanks in advance!
    Rick
     
  2. Finck

    Finck Tele-Afflicted

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    I think it will be easier to put a real binding, black or dark wood. Anyway, sure it will be a nice touch in a light colored top.

    If you decide to paint, probably an airbrush will make your life easier than use a spray can or even a gun. Don't need to be an expensive one, just has to allow you to go reasonably narrow.
     
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  3. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Tele-Meister

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    I'm with Flinck…. Stew-Mac sells Dremel binding routing attachments, and they are not that expensive.
     
  4. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Tele-Afflicted

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    I've tried something similar before and it didn't work out all that well. Even using high quality tape and finish, the line wasn't as crisp or clean as real binding will be. However, if the curves make for difficult binding, I understand your desire. You can try on scrap with your chosen materials, but it's not the most straightforward operation.
     
  5. Old Tele Hack

    Old Tele Hack Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I can't answer the binding question, but, wanted to say that THAT is a gorgeous guitar! I love the colors, the neck pickup surround, eveerything about that looks great!
     
  6. blackbelt308

    blackbelt308 Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the kind words regarding my guitar! Appreciated!

    Yeah, I think you guys are probably right: it is time to delve into my first attempt at binding!

    Thanks,
    Rick
     
  7. Macrogats

    Macrogats Friend of Leo's

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    Can't advise on the binding issue - but dude, that is one beautiful guitar!!
     
  8. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    I have an almost identical body in work - bookmatched ambrosia, natural with just a hint of darkening fade envisioned. I was just planning on regular black binding. No reason your idea wouldn't work, but it's just that sprayed on binding seems more associated with cheap guitars as a labor saving step. I'm with the crowd that recommends the real thing. It could actually be done with real ebony or maybe blackwood, but that would be pricey and possibly fraught with swearing when a carefully prepared thin ebony strip breaks. For the third time. But if you boiled them I bet you could make it work.

    Rex
     
  9. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I am generally with everyone else on the headache.

    At the same time, if I had my heart set on it I think it can be done. I would seal the area first and sand for a smooth finish for quality pistripe tape to adhear to. Spary on a light coat of clear over your pinstrip to seal the edge. Follow with your dark color as dry as possible. If any color seeps under the edge I use a utility knife edge to scrap a fine line.

    Every attempt at something new is an education for the future.

    Eric
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
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  10. Finck

    Finck Tele-Afflicted

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    I've never applied real wooden binding on guitar (actually I've never applied any kind of binding by myself...) but, working on wooden ship models, there's a trick to conform strips of wood: a cheap hair straightener. It works like a charm, no matter how hard the wood is. You just need to soak the strip little with water and pass it between the surfaces of the straightener. Instant curves!

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Very cool insight! Never thought of hair straightener! Something to remeber.

    Erix
     
  12. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    Take it from someone that's actually done ebony binding....use black plastic. Once the finish it on it will look the same and you'll save a lot of money and curse words

    . Weissonator_lower_small.jpg
     
  13. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

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    You could probably cut your hardwood binding using using a CNC. Helmut has probably worked it out.
     
  14. Tomasi

    Tomasi Tele-Meister

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  15. printer2

    printer2 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I usually see people's guitars and say, 'That's nice, I should do one some day.' I very rarely think, 'I want that guitar.' Saved the picture for future drooling.

    While not a method for your madness I had some black ABS binding on a body and I scuffed the surface with sandpaper. It gave a reasonable ebony look.
     
  16. I_build_my_own

    I_build_my_own Friend of Leo's

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    Here is my humble view on faux binding of any kind: I admire everyone who can pull it off with crisp lines and no color bleeding through. I have never managed that. That guitar up there in the first picture is just amazing and the “faux” spalted maple binding adds to the perfection!

    I normally just put regular ABS binding on my builds for 2 reasons: A) cutting a binding channel is no rocket science (even I can do it!!) and B) a ABS binding in my eyes protects the corner way better than a wood binding, regardless if it is faux or real wood binding. Plastic is way more forgiving when something sharp attacks the corner and can get easier repaired than a nick/ding in a wood binding. I believe the inventors of binding had more than just adorning in mind. Just me thinking...:)
     
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  17. I_build_my_own

    I_build_my_own Friend of Leo's

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    Naaa negative :(
     
  18. I_build_my_own

    I_build_my_own Friend of Leo's

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    Ohhh I like this!!!! I mean that resonator in Maricopa’ picture
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2018
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