Fatter C profiles

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by MrDavey2Shoes, Jul 21, 2021.

  1. Muku

    Muku Tele-Meister

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    8503's have fatter necks.
     
  2. MrDavey2Shoes

    MrDavey2Shoes TDPRI Member

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    Check out the 50s modified Vintera. I'm not sure how V it is compared to some of the necks some of the people with more experience have encountered but to me it felt like a rounded off V shape.

    ANYWAY, for now I've found a neck I really love. I happened upon a road worn 50s Vintera and fell in love with the neck and well, everything about it. Its a "thick 50s U" but honestly it feels like a meaty C with a little more shoulder. Which I guess is a U... It feels thinner than the U on the regular Vintera perhaps its the worn down neck or maybe I just got lucky. I bought it after an hour of playing it in the store. Guess that makes me a Tele guy now. :)
     
  3. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    A 50s Vintera Modified is a Baja 50s neck.
     
  4. decibel

    decibel Tele-Meister

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    I find .86" at the 1st fret to be the sweet spot. Thicker does help with cramping, etc...everything you mentioned.
     
  5. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    In @Double Stop's post, above, check out the '69 U profile. 0.850 at the 1st fret and 0.910 at the 12th fret.

    It's found on the James Burton Standard Telecaster and necks sold by themselves are scarce. The guitars were made 1996-2018 IIRC and are out there, but not plentiful. Folks buy them just for the neck. I've had mine since new in 1997 and it's 0.859" at the 1st fret, 0.919" at the 12th fret and 1.685" wide at the nut. It obviously has taper, but it doesn't feel like it has much. It has some shoulder, but it's not pronounced. It's a U-profile that fills the hand, but isn't overly deep.

    I have no clue where you'd find one to try out. Mine was the only one I've seen in a music store, ever, new or used.
     
    Double Stop likes this.
  6. shallbe

    shallbe Tele-Meister

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    I gave up long ago depending on Fender to have consistent and descriptive neck shapes with measurements----like many of their competitors provide. I like fatter necks and Deep C means nothing in Fender land.

    I love the fat necks from Musikraft and AllParts, and build my own now.
     
  7. old wrench

    old wrench Friend of Leo's

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    For the folks that want to take the next step :) - the AllParts necks like the TMO-Fat is a great place to start.

    I think you can still buy them for around $125 bucks or so shipped for the un-finished ones.

    If you like a big, full, profile they are good just as they come, or you can whittle them down to meet your own particular preference.

    I've used a few of them on my earlier builds, and the frets, although they are the smaller "vintage" size, are usually pretty well done.

    Just about any "new" neck benefits from a good quality level, crown, and polish, but the AllParts necks I've used have all been playable just as they come out of the box.

    A simple finish like a wipe-on Poly or TruOil and a nut, and you're pretty much ready to go :).

    You don't need a whole chest full of tools either - one good coarse tooth file for the bulk of the work and another good half-round round file for the curves towards the head and heel, some sandpaper, and a plan of how to proceed, is about all that it takes.

    Larger files - like the 10" or 12" size are much easier to use than the little dinky ones.

    Use two hands to work the file - one hand to drive it, and one hand to steer it and control the pressure that you apply.

    The radius of the larger half-round files is also closer to actual radius that you end up filing into the neck as well, which results in nice and smooth transitions on your neck.

    .

    .
     
  8. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    Getting a neck that's too big and reducing the size to fit your preferences is a good move. I've done it a couple times. Rasps, files, and sandpaper; nothing fancy.
     
  9. Maguchi

    Maguchi Tele-Holic

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    I agree with the OP. I had a bandmate with a Baja Tele with a mild V shaped neck. The stock pickups on his Baja were great and the guitar sounded really good. We would switch guitars and play each other's guitars a lot. The V necks are great for soloing because you rest your thumb on the top side of the V for string bends. However it was uncomfortable for barre chords, there wasn't enough of a flat surface in the middle of the back of the neck to put my thumb for barre chords. I found the C shape more versatile and comfortable for rhythm work and great for soloing too. My favorites are the '60s Cs. Not too thick and not too thin. The right thickness for my medium sized hands.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2021 at 10:42 PM
  10. telekaster1999

    telekaster1999 Tele-Holic

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    I have the Allparts Chunky maple thin semi-gloss on a partscaster and love it.
     
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