Farewell Flatwounds, I’ve thrown in the towel.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Shango66, Jun 29, 2019.

  1. Controller

    Controller Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    3,564
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2010
    Location:
    Montana
    Bill, I like your way with a phrase. Can I use this?

    It's almost like "it is what it is" but less understandable. :p
     
  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    64,075
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    It’s the gol derned foolin’ autocorrect!
     
  3. Grant Austin

    Grant Austin Tele-Meister

    Age:
    37
    Posts:
    252
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2016
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    I didn’t realize it was a relatively common thing. What’s with all the naysayers if several heavy hitters bank on it? Just different strokes?
     
  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    49,711
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Location:
    Kelowna, BC, Canuckistan
    Do as thou whilst.

    14 flats on a 25 1/2" scale jazz box for me.
     
    Shango66 likes this.
  5. stanger

    stanger Tele-Meister

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    171
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Location:
    Idaho Falls, Idaho
    I never liked flats on my archtops. I think they became the archtop standard because they do sound dead, which could actually smooth the tone of a lot of edgy-sounding maple bodied archtop guitars.

    The flats can withstand a real pounding and can hold their tuning well, which was another advantage for the players in the big bands, where the guitar had to be walloped all night long to be heard against the horns, the piano, and with no amplifiers.

    But for good guitar tone, I've always thought round-wound strings were much better. The nickel round wound strings always were my favorite archtop guitar strings.

    I tried one set of half-rounds which sounded OK to me, but only OK. The half-rounds are round wound, then windings are ground flat. They are as quiet as flatwounds, but are livelier strings and don't have the same feel under the fingers.
    A lot of studio players used them because they were quiet, but they weren't ever very popular in general use.
    regards,
    stanger
     
  6. Big_Bend

    Big_Bend Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    6,420
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Ok that was fun. This evening I finally got around to putting on the flatwounds I purchased 2 years ago onto my classic vibe thinline tele with bill lawrence pickups, a wonderful guitar. As previously mentioned, I have never played flats on one of my guitars in my life, until tonight.

    Wow, that was awesome!!! I jammed for over an hour straight, just tearing it up. At first it was weird playing 11s, since I'm usually a hybrid 9, but I soon was really enjoying the new vibe.. the strings felt different from what I used used to, and of course they are not as "bright" as regular electric strings.. but I felt they took the edge off my tele, really made for a whole new sonic experience. I thoroughly enjoyed the sonic textures and tones with the flats... something different, I'll keep regular strings on my other electrics.. but ya the flats are going to stay on my thinline.. I'm quite pleased with the differences.

    Thx for this thread OP. Cheers...
     
    DekeDog and Shango66 like this.
  7. Jack Clayton

    Jack Clayton Tele-Meister

    Age:
    34
    Posts:
    320
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2017
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    I really prefer flatwounds for open tuning, where I'm sliding up and down the fretboard a lot.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.