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Fake famous people quote memes.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by John Backlund, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    You must be joking! Where is the fun in telling the truth when you can just go out half loaded and half cocked spreading ignorance like Typhoid Mary.
    Have Sense of humour about accuracy in reporting, lighten up.
    The TRUTH? It's what I can get you to believe in the Information Age.
    The trump when reduced to it's key component is "WAS IT ENTERTAINING"
    AFTER THAT THE IS NO TRUTH BEYOND CONSENSUS REALITY.
    "WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY"
    George Orwell 1984

    taken from memory
    O'Brien the torturer, to Winston the Though Criminal , "How many Fingers do you see now?"
    Winston 4 , 3, 4, I don't" Screaming " it hurts it hurts, I can't tell
    I don't know stop it 4 ,3, I don't know.
    O'Brian loosen the tension on the rack , and says
    "There that better, we are curing you Winston,
    soon all that you will know is the Love of Big Brother"
    Let me tell you something Winston , Power is the ability to tear minds apart
    and put them back together in the fashion of your own choosing."
    " The Future Winston , Is a boot stomping on a face forever"

    this is taken from my memory of studying the book and the film extensively.
    000big-brother-19841-e1512059066794.jpg
     
  2. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    well check out my post in this tread , maybe you'll rethink you position. Not!
     
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  3. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    Alimentary my dear Watson.....
     
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  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    ... Then you must enjoy a little hate watching! Who doesn't do this, there days?

     
  5. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  6. John Backlund

    John Backlund Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    'Welcome to the information age'...D, A7, G, Em.

    You've got your number, I've got mine,
    electronic tattoos, on a dark screen shine.
    Better learn to dance, son,
    cause they've set the stage,
    with the cattle cars of,
    the information age.

    Welcome to the information age,
    welcome to the information age.

    In bright new ghettos, wear the star of Sam.
    Brother is watching, from the traffic jam.
    An easy sell to, a frightened mass,
    for the heartless brain,
    and the sightless glass.

    Welcome to the information age,
    welcome to the information age.

    Bits of plastic, floating through space,
    your traces vanish, without a trace.
    Jackboot keyboards, kick in your doors,
    and pry your grip from,
    what once was yours.

    Welcome to, the information age.
    welcome to the information age.

    File a lifetime, on a ghost pinhead,
    terminal data, for the spending dead.
    fill your shoebox, put on your rags,
    Hide your treasures,
    and pack your bags.

    Welcome to the information age.
    welcome to the information age.
     
  7. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Imagine Yogi Berra, Sam Elliott, Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, and Warren Buffett getting together and discovering that the same quotes have been attributed to all of them.
     
  8. John Backlund

    John Backlund Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    The copyright lawyers would have a field day.
     
  9. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Poster Extraordinaire

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    It would be nice if people would apply some common sense when assessing information. I think about the old accounting term, “reasonableness”. While allowing that sometimes “truth is stranger than fiction”, one can make an informed assessment of the value of the information or misinformation. In simplest terms, “if it looks and smells like dog crap it likely is.”
    One person has logic and the facts while someone else screams “alternate facts”.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
  10. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  11. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    We're not that clever really....in some ways yes, in most others no. We respond to very basic animal psychology in very predictable ways...which is in itself very predictable because we are in fact animals with a mammalian nervous system so why wouldn't we respond predictably. It's packaged a bit differently then it would be to get dogs and elephants to perform on command but, formally, it's the same training.

    It's been figured out for eons how to get people to buy into a narrative and take sides with fierce determination based on little evidence other than emotional conviction. Emotions rule. Edward Bernays was the modern master at aligning people with products/ideas. He was a nephew of Sigmund Freud. He worked for private corporations as well as the CIA and other government agencies. He had all this stuff figured out and it's the basic template that's used today.

    We, maybe thru the rise of scientific thought, have arrived at a place where most of us believe that we make decisions intellectually, rationally and thoughtfully. It's a ruse!! We are driven by basic emotions attached to basic mammalian needs. We are driven by the need to experience certainty and we will pledge our allegiance to all manner of irrational things simply to arrive at that reassuring feeling of certainty....that the world is known and predictable and consistent and organized means safety. Certainty is one of the fundamental human (mammalian) needs. Too much uncertainty (environmentally, emotionally, ideologically etc.) results in anxiety and ultimately panic. People think they are after the truth when in fact what they are after is the experience of certainty. So, for an organism's physical and emotional survival it is absolutely necessary to value certainty over truth and this is why it's so easy to get people polarized because we love to bath in that warm experience of absolute, unquestioned certainty.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
  12. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yes to how long this has been going on.
    Now we have computer designed algorithms pushing it much further though, and at the same time the minds of today's humans are maybe past critical mass where no amount of the usual dope (drugs, alcohol, TV, credit card/ shopping, lusty pursuits etc) can blot out the cognitive dissonance that eventually broods breeds festers and becomes a mad cancer on our collective sense of wellbeing in our right views.

    Confirmation bias requires repeated rejection of inconsistent info in order to cling to our certainties.

    I'm certain that the subconscious retains all the conflicting info though, which eventually makes a majority uncertain subconscious behind a thin veil of opinion we can't possibly feel comfort in.

    Animal instincts from the lizard brain explode!
    As in the amygdala floods the rational brain with LSD like chemicals driving us to fight or flight.

    Violence ensues!

    I'd be curious to learn if experiments have been done to determine how much cognitive dissonance a normal person can carry day to day before just blowing up.
    Of course we would have to define blowing up!
    Could be displayed in how many memes we collect and turn to for comfort?
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
  13. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    Cognitive dissonance is an idea that I was considering a while back and I've come to unpack that idea a bit more in a way that makes more sense to me and my observations. I now think of cognitive dissonance more in terms of 'narrative dissonance' or 'narrative conflict'. So, to my mind, it kind of plays out like this...the narrative that I have emotionally invested myself into, to the point that I consider it to be unassailable truth or fact, is in conflict with another narrative that I'm being presented with and am being asked to consider.

    I've really come around to liking the idea of a narrative and I think it cuts to the heart of the matter more than 'cognitive' does with respect to the notion of cognitive dissonance. The word cognitive has the implication of the dissonance being strictly mental or intellectual. But that's not an accurate description of the experience of that level of dissonance. It's a bit too neuro-sciencey and serves to imply that we can somehow actually separate ourselves into discreet functions of thought and emotion which is simply not possible. Our emotions that we have invested in the narrative are what is primarily engaged in the experience of dissonance.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2020
  14. Mouth

    Mouth Tele-Afflicted

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    Sorry, I missed that. -Aristotle.
     
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  15. soulgeezer

    soulgeezer Poster Extraordinaire

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    It’s a triffid. That kid’s dead already... ;) :D
     
  16. Wobbles

    Wobbles Tele-Meister

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    If a man said something in the forest, and his wife wasn't there to hear him, is he still wrong?
     
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  17. Weazel

    Weazel Tele-Holic

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    "Dr" Phil?
     
  18. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    I just remembered an old Taoist story of a farmer and his 'misfortunes'. I've cut and pasted this version from Alan Watts. To me there's no better illustration of the dangers of buying into a narrative simply because it evokes a strong emotional response and all the 'facts' embedded into the narrative just feel true. Especially in this day and age where all media, especially social media, is rife with narratives constructed only to evoke those strong emotional responses in order to further an agenda.

    Once upon a time there was a Chinese farmer whose horse ran away. That evening, all of his neighbors came around to commiserate. They said, “We are so sorry to hear your horse has run away. This is most unfortunate.”
    The farmer said, “Maybe.”

    The next day the horse came back bringing seven wild horses with it, and in the evening everybody came back and said, “Oh, isn’t that lucky. What a great turn of events. You now have eight horses!”
    The farmer again said, “Maybe.”

    The following day his son tried to break one of the horses, and while riding it, he was thrown and broke his leg. The neighbors then said, “Oh dear, that’s too bad,”
    ...and the farmer responded, “Maybe.”

    The next day the conscription officers came around to conscript people into the army, and they rejected his son because he had a broken leg. Again all the neighbors came around and said, “Isn’t that great!”
    Again, he said, “Maybe.”
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
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  19. EsquireOK

    EsquireOK Friend of Leo's

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    Well, yes...but in keeping somewhat with the OP...no. What he actually said is, "Ninety percent of the game is half mental." But the way most people quote it is the way I first posted it in this thread.

    The false quote is way better, because it makes no sense whatsoever. The original quote actually does make mathematical sense. It simply means that 45 percent of the game is mental. Nowhere near as funny.
     
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  20. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    Rock on TD!
     
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