Fabric Top: Unfinished

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Zinga, Nov 8, 2019.

  1. Zinga

    Zinga TDPRI Member

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    Hello to everyone!!
    I bought some fabric because I want to try to cover the top of guitar body for a fabric top finish BUT, I am thinking about not putting any clearcoat on top, but just truoiling the rest of the body.

    I was wondering if anyone else did this and if can suggest me something, I'd do it this way.

    1. Sand the guitar body until 600 grit fine
    2. Grainfill the whole guitar (including the top, it's ok?)
    3. Glue the fabric on top (with some titebond or PVA white glue)
    4. Cut the binding slot thru the edges (so I don't have that ugly glue line)
    5. Finish side and back with tru-oil

    I want the fabric to have his original feel at the touch, while the body is actually sealed.
    I am not 100% sure about grainfilling the top to seal the wood on step 2, is that necessary?


    A lot of questions, I hope you can help me guys.
    Thanks!

    (for everyone interested, the kind of fabrics I want to use are Denim and the kimono fabric like this one
     
  2. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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    It's going to be dependent on the specific fabric, but you're likely going to find that the fabric surface isn't going to feel the same all around depending on how the glue penetrates from behind. You may find a need to still do at least a few matte clear-coats to even things out so that any uneven penetration of the glue isn't evident. If you're going to cut the binding recess after laminating the fabric, the fabric is going to have to be saturated with glue at that edge (and fully dry) to avoid a wonky, uneven edge. If the fabric isn't "crispy" where you do the recess with the router, it could tear badly.
     
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  3. netgear69

    netgear69 Tele-Afflicted

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    Like Jim says if you try routing a binding channel on fabric your router bit is going to pull on that fray it or worse rip it off the wood
    routing the channel 1st then glue the fabric then cut the overhang with a scalpel blade will be clean and a lot less stressful
    if you are using a thick fabric like denim there is no need to prep that body up to 600 grit on the front 80 grit will be fine the rougher it is the more grip the glue will have
     
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  4. Zinga

    Zinga TDPRI Member

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    Yeah, I didn't take count of the glue that penetrates the fabric!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  5. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    Seems like it would get really dirty pretty quickly.
     
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  6. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    If you sand the top with your tru oil you'll make a slurry that fills the grain. Level sand after that happens. Grain won't really read through the fabric, but any major dips at glue joints or gouges will.

    Coarse fabric takes many coats to cover it. You'll get tired of putting finish layers on before you submerge it.

    Make sure to do a test run of your process on scrap wood.

    Watch the Texas Toast youtube channel fabric top videos for other hints. They have an older series from two or three years ago and an updated one they just did this last spring/summer.

    .
     
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  7. Zinga

    Zinga TDPRI Member

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    I've seen before those videos, I think I'll follow those instructions :) Thanks
     
  8. Steve 78

    Steve 78 Friend of Leo's

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    It is possible to glue the fabric so it doesn't soak through if you use a thin layer of glue. As always, test on scrap first.
     
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