EZDrummer question

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by popthree, Jan 21, 2019.

  1. popthree

    popthree Poster Extraordinaire

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    Do most of you leave your drum tracks in MIDI format or do you render a .wav after you get it all laid out. I haven't worked with MIDI before. It's funky.
     
  2. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    I'm not an ED user but will be watching this with interest.

    For mine I would leave it as MIDI so I could split the kit up into separate tracks and then convert to .wav
     
  3. StrangerNY

    StrangerNY Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I usually leave tracks as MIDI so I can swap out individual drum samples or tunings (or even the full kit) as needed.

    If I'm doing a collab or need to pass the drum track off to someone else, I'll save it as a WAV, but I always keep the MIDI track handy.

    - D
     
  4. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I used it , I left it as MIDI.
     
  5. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Ad Free Member

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    I leave it as MIDI til the last possible second and don't render unless I really need system resources ... and that doesn't happen much because my old beast has much more beef than the computers I had in the past. It's useful to have the MIDI for touching up your drums as your mix develops. If you do need to render, save a file with the MIDI data so you can tweak it, re-render, and fly it in if necessary. But you probably already knew that!

    Afterthought: Are you breaking your individual drums out into separate tracks?
     
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  6. popthree

    popthree Poster Extraordinaire

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    >>Afterthought: Are you breaking your individual drums out into separate tracks?

    well, i'm tinkering with both approaches right now... trying to get my brain around the benefits of each approach. i know you've been using ezd for a while now, how are you doing it @woodman ?
     
  7. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Ad Free Member

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    I was a tape diehard and a pretty dumb bunny about everything digital when I started out about 10 years ago. In the early going, EZD seemed like a miracle, just having coherent drums that didn't suck! If it was a cover I was doing just for fun, I didn't break 'em out, because I had so much higher-priority stuff to learn. I found out in the Tascam days that completing projects was the key to finding your way around, so with the one-track EZ method I could complete more projects quicker and move on to the next lesson. But at a certain point, I started *hearing* just why you need control over each drum and cymbal.

    But that was then, this is now. ... Generally I'll tweak the faders in the EZD mixer window for general levels and leave the whole kit as a single track until all the other tracks are down — no need to complicate things too early in the game. At the point where you start EQing and compressing your other tracks, you need to be doing it to your drums too, because you can make them far more distinct and toneful than they are in the wash of a single track. It's not like you can add magic through mysterious tricks and expensive gear, it's more that you can subtract suckage with the basic tools — EQ and compression — that come with your DAW. The EZD samples are excellent, so the challenge is sculpting them within your mix so they play nice not only among themselves, but also with the other instruments.

    Once you're satisfied with your drums, bus them to an aux channel with a little compression on it to glue them all back together. It shouldn't take much, because you'll already have compression on the individual drum channels that need it (kick, snare, toms almost always benefit by a touch). Don't compress your overheads unless you like cymbals that sound like hissing iguanas! ... Keep in mind, all this is in my experience and your mileage may vary hugely. ... If you listen long enough, you'll begin to hear. :D
     
  8. mistermikev

    mistermikev Tele-Holic

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    a wav track will take much longer to open than easy drummer. will take more space than midi. it will be less flexible as you can't easily change the velo of this hit or change this part from hh to rd. the advantages of wav: if you update and something goes wrong where ed suddenly won't run on your machine, or you are worried about losing the perfectly modified ed kit... you will have that take saved... likely save ram. I always keep in midi.
     
  9. cleanheadsteve

    cleanheadsteve Tele-Meister

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    i build most drum tracks with band in a box. then export the wave file to my daw. so i use .wav right from the beginning

    Sent from my Coolpad 3632A using Tapatalk
     
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  10. RocknRollShakeUp

    RocknRollShakeUp Tele-Meister

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    Dumb questions alert:

    How does EZ drummer compare to the Garageband smart drummers or whatever they are called?

    Can one use EZ drummer with Garageband?

    Thanks!
     
  11. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    Discovered today that you can export the drum track from BIAB as individual MIDI tracks which gives you total control.

    You want a bit of verb on the snare alone or a rim shot, cross stick or pressed roll, no worries.

    I use Reaper and had to set the source of each MIDI track to Ch1 so the VSTi would pick it up.

    If you want piano to comp on the beat or off beat just copy a suitable track and use a different VSTi, the world becomes your oyster

    Export from Real Band only gives you a single wave file for the whole kit which is limiting
     
  12. Pineears

    Pineears Tele-Afflicted

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    Then there is the BIAB plugin that you can use inside your DAW.
     
  13. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    There certainly is, BiaB 2019 for PC only at the moment.

    I have done the upgrade and tested it in Reaper but not done much with it yet, it does appear to only import a single file for the drums though
     
  14. Pineears

    Pineears Tele-Afflicted

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    I got it and loaded it into Reaper, that’s as far as I got. For me I hope practicing singing and guitar stays ahead of needing individual drum tracks.
     
  15. suthol

    suthol Friend of Leo's

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    We write most of our stuff in BiaB which I import into Reaper and then replace as many of the tracks as we can play, bass, guitars & pedal steel.

    This way we get to retain the feel we want and remove as much of the karaoke feel from it as possible
     
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  16. Rolling Estonian

    Rolling Estonian Friend of Leo's

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    Guitar Pro has come in handy for me getting drum tracks from, tons of GP files out there, great for covers and general templates. Simple convert to midi and you're in business.

    M
     
  17. codamedia

    codamedia Friend of Leo's

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    I use Superior Drummer but the same principle applies with EZ (which I also own)

    I keep it midi, using multi-outs so I can separate the kick, snare, hats, etc... etc... on to their own channels for mixing. Leaving the track in MIDI allows me to easily alter it if I need to, but I still get to process the tracks separately.

    When it comes time to ARCHIVE the track, I export all the audio stems in case I need them. I'll have a separate audio file for each drum part - all in mono. If I ever need to load the song on a system without Superior (or EZ) or if I ever decide i don't want to use the software anymore I will still have an audio copy.

    I treat my soft synths the exact same...
     
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