experiences with heating up glue reset fingerboard/neck

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by hopdybob, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,117
    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    netherlands
    i have an old L6s copy with a neck problem.
    the trussrod cannot be adjusted that much to get it straight enough and stay straight when strings are setup.
    (did the extra washer trick already and that gave a better working trussrod, also pre clamping the neck in a backbowe
    and then tightening the trussrod)

    the problem is that with this glued on neck the relieve curve starts were the neck isn't above the body.
    it creates what they sometimes call a humb by raised wood with bolt on necks.
    but without strings i get a almost straight neck

    now i have read that some people heat up the fretboard when the neck is clamped in the right position.
    the warm glue would give the fretboard the space to reset a little on the neck and when cooling down it will stay better in the position you want.

    (i hope i explain it correctly/understandable)

    my question now is if some off you have experience in this technique, and if this could be a possible solution?
    and if you did, how did you heat up the glue?
     
  2. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,988
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Location:
    meridianam altum centralis
    Special heat iron, that conducts heat to a clamped neck:

    [​IMG]

    But a body joint hump may be more problematic. I think you have to either remove frets and plane the fretboard flat, or, try to live with the hump, and compensate with the rest of the action setup, provided its not TOO humped.
     
  3. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,706
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2008
    Location:
    Manheim Pa.
    If the guitar plays OK , try to live with it .
    Your issue is one of geometry . The only real cure for that is a neck reset .
     
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    20,637
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
    The couple times I have done this, I've removed the frets. I've put aluminum foil over the fretboard. I've heated it up with the household electric flat iron running back and forth other the top of it. I pried it up carefully and go back and heat and pry.

    Old 70's MIJ copies were not noted for their quality in many cases, depending on the mfg of course. Matsomoku was the exception.
     
  5. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    983
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2015
    Location:
    Kalamazoo
    You have to be very careful not to overheat the neck. I've had success using the heat from the sun on a hot day. You get a strong piece of wood or metal and use clamps and shims to bend the neck a little bit. Then you heat it and let it cool with the clamps still on.

    You could use a 300 watt halogen work light as a heat source also. You don't need to heat the neck up much. If it gets too hot to touch it is getting hot enough to bubble up and destroy the finish.
     
  6. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,117
    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    netherlands
    good info here, thank you!
    because the problem is at the heel side i thought to heat up almost the complete fretboard but leave the last part, say 2 ore 3 frets at the nut alone.
    in my thinking that would lock the fretboard at its place (think scale nut>bridge) and the rest can reset when the glue would get soft.
    if this would not work the only option would be removing the fretboard complete an try to route some canals for use of carbon rods
     
  7. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    14,192
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Spring City, Pa
    I had this done to my '36 Duolian by Marc Schoenberger.
    He uses a solar set up (California stuff!) that takes time.
    It worked quite well and was reasonably priced.
     
  8. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,117
    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    netherlands
    well, this week i tried it out.
    here are some pictures

    [​IMG]

    the piece of metal/ruler on the frets is a tool to use when sawing something in a straight line as guide.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    about 2000 watt together on a damp cloth (to prevent the paint would meld on the ruler)
    the trussrod was tightened and the clamp on the headstock was creating a good back bow.
    after somewhat a half our to a our i felt on the back of the neck and it was warm, so u pulled the plugs and let it cool down .
    it stayed in the backbow.
    strung up to pitch and the strings hit the frets, turned the bridge higher, lowered the tension on the trussrod and slowly it got straight with a little relief.
    so in this case, it seems to worked out fine, but time will tell ;-)
     
    Tonetele and guitarbuilder like this.
  9. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,117
    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    netherlands
    neck is still in good position, the up bow seems to be repaired :D
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.