Example of an email you would send to a potential place you want to play?

Junkyard Dog

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Some of the civic events (e.g. Thursday Night Summer Concerts on the Town Square) around here ONLY accept email submissions. And I have booked through event planners who only use text messaging and are way too busy to actually meet with you face to face. So...I think you really just need to be prepared to communicate with the client/customer via their preferred channel.
 

Call Me Al

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Banjo player does most of the outreach to new places, here’s one he wrote:

E4D2C63B-5D89-4EEC-B361-134A5A63CE5F.jpeg
 

T Prior

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Some of the civic events (e.g. Thursday Night Summer Concerts on the Town Square) around here ONLY accept email submissions. And I have booked through event planners who only use text messaging and are way too busy to actually meet with you face to face. So...I think you really just need to be prepared to communicate with the client/customer via their preferred channel.
And if thats the case, then we do as requested for those venues. But at least learn the NAMES Of those in charge and write a note to them directly. Knowing someone's name starts a relationship, as small as it may be. It shows that we did some homework. Dear Sir or Madaam is not a name ! 😀


But for other venues, go in person, learn who's in charge. Getting gigs is not a passive journey.

One of the biggest issues that we have seen in the hiring of bands, trios. duo's etc is many times it is passed down to a waitress/ waiter/bartender, or even a 3rd party. And it can change very often. These are extremely difficult hills to climb as they tend to hire friends bands.
 

Peegoo

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An in-person meeting with the manager is the only way to do it. Anything else is Craig's List behavior.

It proves to them you're serious about it.

Bring with you a press kit (folder) with a one-page band bio and links to your social media presence, as well as a few business cards. Also in the press kit should be a DVD with video of your group in action, as well as a few studio-quality recordings of your stuff. Have an electronic copy of your band bio on the disc too. Some clubs like to at least see your fan base email list. The bigger the better.
 

bgmacaw

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Response....

Dear Dad Band,

Since we installed a karaoke machine we are no longer booking bands. Sorry.

Sincerely,

JP Barowner
 

Marc Morfei

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I always send very good introductory emails that hit all the marks. And I do not believe I have ever once received a response. I guess email is just not a very effective selling method. Especially for cold calling.

I have found you need to go in person and speak directly to the responsible person face to face. When you are a known entity and looking for repeat bookings it’s easier. But first time? Gotta be face to face. Takes a ton of time, driving all over, but it works.
 

Marc Morfei

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1. Stop in person (possibly phone call) and ask who is the person responsible for booking entertainment. Ask for their phone number and when they are likely to be there.
2. Stop in person and talk to that person. When they are not there, leave a phone message, which they will ignore.
3. Repeat many times until you get lucky and that person is actually there.
4. When you finally get to speak to them, the message is: we are a good band; we'd love to play here; this is the kind of music we do (the kind your customers will love); we have friends, family and fans who will come; add any local or personal connections to the venue.
5. Have available dates and try to close the deal on the spot.
6. Leave behind a flyer that has your contact info and links to any web presence.
7. Get a web presence. Can be as simple as a Facebook page. But it is surprisingly easy to get a dedicated website up and running.

My typical experience is that it is almost impossible to reach the decision-maker. They ignore all emails, phone calls, visits, everything, over and over and over. But when I finally succeed in tracking them down, they are very friendly and happy to book a date right then. This is literally the pattern almost every time. I think I have been able to get a gig every venue we've tried, and we always get asked back for repeat gigs. But the amount of work it takes to get the first gig is gargantuan.
 

SPUDCASTER

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Find out who does the hiring, send them your promo packet and follow up with a phone call in a timely manner.

Request and interview when you call. At their convenience.

Or, you can cold call the person hiring. With your packet. You do take a chance that they're busy and can't talk to you then.

An email seems lazy to me. I guess I'm old school. But I was never out of work.
 




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