Example of an email you would send to a potential place you want to play?

fcmusician

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Got the duo thing back up and running and am looking at some different places to possibly play but I don't exactly know what to say or ask if I send an email. Anybody have an example of what they would write? I'm sure you would want to make it short and sweet to keep their interest. Figured an email first and then go to the actual place and look for whoever does the hiring.
 

scottser

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I always try to speak to the relevant person first then follow up with an email, which is basically a template.
You'll do well to keep the email short, ^we heard great things about your place and would love to play there' etc.
include a recording, preferably a video, links to your social media which should include appropriate payment rates, stage equipment requirements, booking forms, contact details and the like.

Fair play for doing it. I hate the business side of showbusiness personally.
Best of luck.
 

Junkyard Dog

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Here is a copy/paste of one I used to send out. It may give you some ideas..

Hello Loose Tooth Saloon!

I am the lead singer/guitar player for __________, a local band that has been entertaining audiences around the tri-state area for seven years now. We play popular rock, country, and Motown cover songs and audience requests. Our website is below with information and audio/video examples.

We can perform as a three or four piece band (drums, bass, electric guitars...all members also sing) and also pare down to duo and solo formats as venue, budget, etc. requires. We have our own sound system and do an excellent job at maintaining a volume level appropriate for bar/restaurant settings.

We would love the opportunity to perform at the Loose Tooth Saloon, and and we currently have the following remaining available weekend dates in 2015:

Nov 14, 20, 21
Dec 4, 5, 11

I can be reached via email at ___________ or cell phone (555-1212)

Regards,
 

Blue Bill

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loudboy

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If you don't have a link to a video of you playing in a packed venue, you probably won't have much luck.

And you need to be able to back it up - if they do book you, and no one shows, you're done. Sometimes in the middle of the gig.

Especially in this day and age, it's all about asses in seats, and how much they drink. We did what any normal person would have perceived as a great gig, a few years back - full house, dancefloor packed from the get go for 3 hours. Didn't get rebooked, because they didn't buy enough booze. Her exact words - "You guys are better, and nicer people than a lot of the other bands I get, but I didn't make enough money."

If you're looking at wallpaper gigs, this might not apply as much - be personable, quiet, and on time and you'll get some work.
 

Milspec

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One of the biggest mistakes people make in business is using a media for the initial contact for selling. At the end of the day, you are a business (unless you play for free) so approach it in that manner.

Talking to people in person is always the best approach and if that is difficult for you, learn how, it will make your life easier.

Look for venues you would like to play. Frequent the location and check out what the customers are like, what kind of music do they enjoy, who the owner is, etc. Be a customer first! Then once you have spent some money, start talking to the owner about performing at his/her place. They will be far more receptive when they have a relationship with you already as a customer.

Use emails only after that foundation is complete to work out the details.
 

fcmusician

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Dear sir or madam (it’s still good form to assume they are a madam):

We’re showing up on Thursday with a truck full of rock’n’roll. We’ll drink for free and our fee is $___. Any lip from the bartender or doorman and we’ll fit your dressing room. Understand?

Kindest regards,

X_____
LOL.....Now that's how you get a point across!
 

fcmusician

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One of the biggest mistakes people make in business is using a media for the initial contact for selling. At the end of the day, you are a business (unless you play for free) so approach it in that manner.

Talking to people in person is always the best approach and if that is difficult for you, learn how, it will make your life easier.

Look for venues you would like to play. Frequent the location and check out what the customers are like, what kind of music do they enjoy, who the owner is, etc. Be a customer first! Then once you have spent some money, start talking to the owner about performing at his/her place. They will be far more receptive when they have a relationship with you already as a customer.

Use emails only after that foundation is complete to work out the details.
great idea. Thanks for that information.
 

Slippery Jack

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I think that the best option is always face to face chat, as others have recommended above. That way you can get the blag going and sell your band. I've always been successful with a fun, lighthearted approach rather than the up my own backside, we're such technically gifted musicians type of approach.

It's difficult to drive around and get to meet the person who books the bands, even when you turn up when they said that they would be there. Which means that you will probably have to call them and do it over the phone, which is significantly less successful than face to face. If they say send an email, the chances are that you're being given the brush off. However, still send it, you never know and I've got gigs from emails, but never from a cold call email.

Be prepared to get one gig from ten enquiries. Maybe you'll get more, maybe less, but be prepared for the knock backs. It's not personal, it's life.

Also, get yourself organised. If you get a list of twenty venues, write them down, put the phone numbers next to them. When you call, write down who you spoke to, and the outcome ie do you have to call back, was it a no, do you have to speak to Bob etc. It's so easy to forget when you're on your eighth call and all of the ensuing yes/no/maybe etc.

Be prepared for the person who said call back at 11am tomorrow, to not be there, or to swear that they never said anything of the sort.

If you get lucky, confirm it in an email with price timings etc. More detail is better than less.

Finally, don't expect these bozos to be professional. They are booking entertainment at their venue and don't realise how important it is to their business. I sometimes wonder whether they just sit around waiting for someone to call them when they run out of beer, instead of getting onto the brewery. Some are professional and on top of it, but so many are not. But you must be professional, at least one of the partners in the deal has to be.

These are my thoughts and experiences. I'm sure that others have different experiences, and I'm all ears.
 

fcmusician

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I think that the best option is always face to face chat, as others have recommended above. That way you can get the blag going and sell your band. I've always been successful with a fun, lighthearted approach rather than the up my own backside, we're such technically gifted musicians type of approach.

It's difficult to drive around and get to meet the person who books the bands, even when you turn up when they said that they would be there. Which means that you will probably have to call them and do it over the phone, which is significantly less successful than face to face. If they say send an email, the chances are that you're being given the brush off. However, still send it, you never know and I've got gigs from emails, but never from a cold call email.

Be prepared to get one gig from ten enquiries. Maybe you'll get more, maybe less, but be prepared for the knock backs. It's not personal, it's life.

Also, get yourself organised. If you get a list of twenty venues, write them down, put the phone numbers next to them. When you call, write down who you spoke to, and the outcome ie do you have to call back, was it a no, do you have to speak to Bob etc. It's so easy to forget when you're on your eighth call and all of the ensuing yes/no/maybe etc.

Be prepared for the person who said call back at 11am tomorrow, to not be there, or to swear that they never said anything of the sort.

If you get lucky, confirm it in an email with price timings etc. More detail is better than less.

Finally, don't expect these bozos to be professional. They are booking entertainment at their venue and don't realise how important it is to their business. I sometimes wonder whether they just sit around waiting for someone to call them when they run out of beer, instead of getting onto the brewery. Some are professional and on top of it, but so many are not. But you must be professional, at least one of the partners in the deal has to be.

These are my thoughts and experiences. I'm sure that others have different experiences, and I'm all ears.
Thanks for that insight. very informative. Like I said in an earlier post. I'm taking all this info and figuring out my next move.
 

beyer160

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Consider signing on with a talent agency or with a booking agent. Yes they'll have their hand in your pocket, but they have contacts you'll never acquire by knocking on doors, and they only make money when YOU make money.
 

T Prior

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If you send an EMAIL (not recommended) you may just be 1 more out of a 100 looking for the same gig. It will end up in the recycle bin !

Email is the lazy mans job interview.

Go in person, sell YOURSELF and what you have to offer. Yes it may take a few trips to learn who's in charge and actually address them in person. Its not easy and its not supposed to be.

Its a JOB interview.

Years back, we spent two weeks going out each night to maybe 2 or 3 venues, we even brought an MP3 player.
The end result was rotation for several clubs which lasted near 4 years.

It wasn't easy , The other thing was, we walked into a few DIVES which we passed on ! Who knew

AND, we also met a few other musicians that we ended up playing with from time to time. Who knew !
 
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beagle

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I would call or cold visit, learn WHO hires and when they are there and GO SEE THEM in person
Wear you clean clothes !

The singer and I always used to visit prospective venues. We always tried to buy a meal if they served food and talked to the manager. We usually got the gig and played very few dives.
 

T Prior

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The singer and I always used to visit prospective venues. We always tried to buy a meal if they served food and talked to the manager. We usually got the gig and played very few dives.
YEP ! At the time we visited a Steak House that had a back room bandstand and dance floor, it was a hot spot for Country Music. We did the same , we ordered and ate a steak dinner and got the gig, we were on rotation for near two years. We would sometimes go ahead of the gig and have dinner and hang with the owner for a bit.
 




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