Everybody has a book in them

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by fuzzbender, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    No. It's more like, go ahead and write the book, just don't publish it until you've learned how to write a book. The late, great SciFi legend, Ray Bradbury, used to advise new writers to throw out the first million words you write because they are probably crap.
     
  2. johnreardon

    johnreardon Tele-Afflicted

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    Not quite true.

    Amazon have a 6-8 week schedule before they approve or reject your book for distribution. Books have to adhere to certain standards such as size, binding, copyright pages etc. as well as having an ISBN.

    Took me 8 weeks from publishing date before it started appearing. Luckily my editing managed to get it right first time.
     
  3. johnreardon

    johnreardon Tele-Afflicted

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    I would be surprised that any 'ego' clause prevented publishers correcting spelling mistakes. Yes editing content is probably prevented
     
  4. brianswindall

    brianswindall Tele-Afflicted

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    More choice is better. I want every writer to publish. Makes the dream attainable. Just means the reader must be more discerning. The reader cannot lose by having more choice. Only the writer can lose by self-publishing. So what's the problem - having too many books to choose from?:rolleyes:
     
  5. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I think Ray was right.

    Unfortunately, it is like that for song lyrics as well. I wrote a lot of stuff that got wiped out by Katrina and I've come to terms with the fact that most of it was self indulgent and not worth fretting over now that it is gone.

    I idolize Neil Young and everyone knows it but this Waging Heavy Peace is a typical example of a book that should never have made it into publication. Neil is in a "record everything" mode right now and for music, that works for his music I know - but not for his efforts at prose where he's as mortal as any man out there.

    If everyone records everything, in sound form or words, and the rest of us are charged with sifting through masses and masses of it we'll seldom be putting our time to its best use. I wish there was a gateway or certification process with jurors or something but it simply doesn't work that way.

    I disagree with Brian because I see the same pattern over and over. People on limited budgets, or people back in 1960 read everything they could lay their hands on. Once books became plentiful, people were overwhelmed by too many choices so they read far less than they once did. Brian is not acknowledging what I feel is a critical aspect of reading. You need to be able to discuss what you read with others to really incorporate it into your body of experience and to commit some of it to long term memory. If you can't find a soul you can relate to who also read the book or short story (or poem) you may as well be reading People Magazine because it will flush right through you and leave no trace or nearly none.
     
  6. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    I have two friends that I have known since the beginning of time. One of them had a very interesting experience and loads of stories about it. The other friend has offered to write it, saying that he's just naturally good at writing. Or, as he put it, "naturally good at Writing." He writes fairly well for his job, but can't even tell when he veers of track in terms of basic writing conventions. Sure, if he used these to a worthwhile effect, who cares about rules. But it just looks so amateurish and off the cuff. I doubt that he would be open to someone editing his work. In fact, why should he even expect that an editor will put everything in shape?
     
  7. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

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    I try to have fiber in my diet, but not that much, at least not at one time.

    When I get a complete song written, I maybe could start to consider chapter one.
     
  8. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    BB, I like ya ta death...but that right there is a pretty scary promulgation. :eek:
     
  9. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    John, I was being slightly facetious about Amazon. But the bar is pretty low to get listed on Amazon, regardless of how long it takes to do so. Years ago, it was somewhat of a badge of honor for an author's book to be listed on Amazon - not so anymore. The site has been diluted by the 2 million books a year that I mentioned above.

    And, to disagree about copy editing (spelling, grammar, etc.) as as opposed to content editing, most of the copy editing mistakes I see are in the bestsellers.
     
  10. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    With music, you can sample the song before you buy it.

    With books, you have to pay before you're allowed to read it.
     
  11. pachap

    pachap Tele-Meister

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    I have two that I am working on.

    The first is a work of fantasy that has a strong identity crisis vibe to it, primarily of a spiritual nature. The protagonist is a faulty character, and I take some joy in writing about him because I hate books in which the main characters can do no wrong. I have what will be 2 books about these characters and plot-line written, with probably 2 more books about them in me. I plan on taking the character full-circle in his development as a person in the book. I have let others read excerpts and have gotten some good feedback, so I am cautiously optimistic about it. I will certainly self-publish, but I am still editing the 1st book, and the 2nd is going to have to see some significant changes.

    Basically a few years ago, at about 34 yrs old, I entered a short story contest at the college I was attending, and though I didn't win I was very encouraged by the compliments and constructive criticism. I knew I had a story I could tell to others, but just had to set down and work on it.

    The second book is spawned off research from my recently completed B.A. in History. It deals with local history of the Prince Hall Masonic Lodge, an African-American lodge. It started out as a project in a class, and I greatly enjoyed the process of meeting lodge members and interviewing them and collecting their history. For a masonic lodge, they were very open about their history and very willing to help me out. I ended up with so much material, and the professor was so impressed with the work and intrigued by the story of the lodge that he urged me to work on it after graduation. He has been giving me some great help and advice. The stories I collected are just so good that they have to be heard. This one is still some ways away and I plan on self-publishing it. I have been told by my old professor that he would like to use it as a text book should I get it finished properly.
     
  12. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I know it is scary. The mere idea, and then the knowing it might be the "best" solution, stands for the proposition IMO that too many books are just too many.

    Another solution would be Taxation. The person with the deepest pockets gets to publish, others don't. Obviously the Medicine is worse than the disease.

    Then there's Amazon bookseller's lists, and on line reviewing. We know this gets gamed heavily - I can't place any trust on all these paid for reviews, and mass purchases to get this book or that one on to the List.

    All I'm saying is if there was a way to manage how much reading gets shoved down our throats, I'd be excited to see a proliferation of books. But we can't manage it and I think it will overwhelm us and dilute our culture to nothing.
     
  13. delb0y

    delb0y Tele-Meister

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    It turned out I had a few westerns in me. Four so far - just short 'library' novels. Currently working on a thriller - but I've tried them several times before and never got anywhere with them. But I write every morning before breakfast. If I don't do it then it doesn't get done.
     
  14. johnreardon

    johnreardon Tele-Afflicted

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    I would hate to see the high bar then. :D

    These are just the mandatory requirements on the publish on demand site I used. Other requirements exist as well. Nothing really complex, however they all have to be met. I don't see it as a badge of honour. On the contrary, I wish everyone would buy from the publisher site as Amazon takes a huge margin. It's just the market potential is increased

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  15. LarryInTexas

    LarryInTexas Tele-Meister

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    I have two books published (on Amazon's Kindle Store), with my 3rd book that will be out in a few days.
     
  16. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Joe, are there folks you can contact to edit a book? what does that cost?
     
  17. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    Yes, there are freelance editors. Price will vary, depending on if you want content editing, copy editing or both. Some charge by the page, too. Expect anything from a couple of hundred dollars to a thousand or more. I know some small publishers who contract with editors for around $400 per book.

    There is also an annual guidebook - Jeff Herman's Guide to Book Publishers, Editors and Literary Agents. Suggest you look for it in your library. It can give you names based on genre and location.
     
  18. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I'll take a look. 400.00 is very reasonable... I'd like to finish some things, but would want a person to edit it... fun!
     
  19. JoeNeri

    JoeNeri Friend of Leo's

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    Just make sure your editor has experience in the genre you're writing.
     
  20. brianswindall

    brianswindall Tele-Afflicted

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    The certification process was the publisher or peer review. Now that anyone can write a book and publish it themselves (although peer review still sets certain standards in academia and the like) the gatekeeper status of the publisher is gone, to some extent. How many great books will never be read because a publisher decided it wouldn't sell (we shall never know).

    I say this is good. You say it is bad. We can agree to disagree but I am happy to have more choice. My vetting process is word of mouth. I will sooner read a book that is recommended to me by someone who's opinion I respect or admire, whether it be someone I know or a reviewer that I am familiar with. That''s just me, though. Choice is a symptom of the age we live in and I am happy for that.
     
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