Every brand expect was a POS except Gibson, Fender, and few others?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by Donny Osmond fan, Oct 16, 2019.

  1. Donny Osmond fan

    Donny Osmond fan Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    898
    Joined:
    May 6, 2018
    Location:
    Uknown.
    They were built for as little money as possible. Sure I understand that. But every one could have been great quality for the price point and every one surly was not trash? A few but not every one?
     
  2. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    6,602
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Location:
    on my bike
    My head hasn't made it past the title.
     
  3. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Holic

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    839
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Location:
    UK and EU
    Me too. I tried a Les Paul once in my very young days and was knocked sideways by the sheer class.
     
    Jerry J likes this.
  4. Donny Osmond fan

    Donny Osmond fan Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    898
    Joined:
    May 6, 2018
    Location:
    Uknown.
    I understand that. Once I got a great guitar it was night and day. But I also own my Yamaha and it is amazing if it is sort of cheap. But Rondo sells Agile that makes great LP copies. But I just can get my head around the fact that ever vintage off brand or B brand put out thousands of guitars with quality issues and did not notice it.

    Or did not care. Or never did know or learn to make a great guitar in a price point like Epiphone or Squire? If you have been around for years you should have learned to make a great guitar or you was just plain stupid.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2019
  5. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,755
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Location:
    Near Athens GA USA
    That's a significant part of it. Guitar techs, especially ones who could work on electric guitars, weren't that common outside of large cities. Even those weren't typically available or known to the average person. There was no internet or even books (pre-Earlwine) that could teach this although there were a few articles here and there in magazines like Popular Mechanics.

    But there were sometimes corners cut on these catalog guitars that shouldn't have been, for example, no truss rod. People were still learning how to manufacture guitars and there was no CNC to make it easy. There wasn't a lot of consistency. Today, we mostly see the survivors from that age that were among the better made ones. The bad ones mostly got tossed out in the trash decades ago.
     
  6. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,650
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Location:
    europe
    These would be pretty cheap if Prince hadn't played one.
    [​IMG]

    Same with these basses, although played by someone else.
    [​IMG]

    In fact, I don't think they would still make versions of them later.
     
  7. Donny Osmond fan

    Donny Osmond fan Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    898
    Joined:
    May 6, 2018
    Location:
    Uknown.
    And every company copied that bass. Univox, Teisco, and a slew of others.
     
    radiocaster likes this.
  8. Gyprock

    Gyprock TDPRI Member

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    26
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2019
    Location:
    Jersey
    Think it's more about the cheap wood/parts used in them, than learning to make better guitars...
     
    P Thought likes this.
  9. tvas22

    tvas22 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    29
    Posts:
    117
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2016
    Location:
    UK
    I only have some limited experience here, but I have two Eko rangers (one 6 string and one 12) which I really love. No, I wouldn't say they're great guitars but they both now play really well and definitely have 'a sound' which works surprisingly well when recorded. One was my mum's, so has sentimental value added in, and the 12 string was cheap (<£40). I wouldn't sell either though, even if I had a 'good' acoustic. Both are great players that sound really nice. I did have to install a bridge doctor on both though.

    I also had an Arbiter SG melody maker copy that I traded a yamaha practice amp for, which actually sounded OK. But I knew that I was never going to get it to a place where I was happy with how it played. The neck needed shimming (a lot) and it had this really stiff, unwieldy feel to it. I don't believe that you could have ever made that a real player.

    It looked cool though... But I sold it. I sold it for about £100 a few years ago, see ones in worse condition going for a lot more than that today.
     
  10. Old Deaf Roadie

    Old Deaf Roadie Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    907
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2017
    Location:
    Oregon
    As I see it, the popular brands had something the smaller brands didn't & the market responded accordingly. Whether that something is quality, or sound, or price is anybody's guess.
     
  11. urbandefault

    urbandefault Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    311
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2016
    Location:
    Yukon OK
    Once upon a time, rock & roll music became popular. Everybody's kid wanted to be like those guys on the radio and TV. So, in true capitalist fashion, lots of companies started making and/or selling guitars at the price point they knew would sell. It didn't matter that some were next to unplayable, they were selling dreams. Some of those dreamers became the next wave of guys on the radio and TV.

    That's why there were so many cheap guitars. ;)
     
  12. LowCaster

    LowCaster Tele-Holic

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    708
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Location:
    Paris, France
    Nobody says those brands never made one good guitar. Chances are that even if you tried to make junk one guitar would be OK from time to time. Or it could be fixed with a good setup. Ask Seasick Steve. One could play a broomstick.

    Nobody says they could not learn or improve quality. Japanese manufacturers in the early 70’s proved it. But some don’t.

    A brand could make the best quality but not be successful, or just shut down for some reason. Known or unknown doesn’t relate to quality.

    For example Old Danlectros are highly prized. Even though they are really cheaply built. Cool guitars.

    Burns was nice, but disappeared too.

    And so on...
     
    Wildcard_35 and smartsoul72 like this.
  13. Wallaby

    Wallaby Tele-Meister

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    272
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Location:
    Midwest
    This is an interesting article about Chicago-made guitars and instruments.

    https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/19828-the-guitars-that-chicago-built

    I've always thought of the Chicago guitar factories as an "onshore offshore" business that existed before offshore manufacturing as we know it now existed.

    I think the catalog business was responsible for most of the POS makes and models. Those workshops could probably produce decent guitars, but not at a price point that made sense for catalog sales. They weren't set up to compete with established "quality" brands on a large scale.
     
    Telecastoff1 likes this.
  14. Donny Osmond fan

    Donny Osmond fan Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    898
    Joined:
    May 6, 2018
    Location:
    Uknown.
    The new Burns Of London are great quality. And expensive too.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Delirium, Antmax and SecretSquirrel like this.
  15. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,871
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Location:
    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !
    .

    1- The other brands did not spend on marketing to get their gear in the hands of pro players/television
    2- Marketing in magazines and getting good "gear reviewers"
    3- Price, below some low point "it can't be any good because it's so cheap"

    Think back to high school and whatever jeans brand was sold by Sears/Walmart/etc for cheap you couldn't be seen in. You had to have a designer-of-the-moment label. Kids do the same with shoe brands.

    Guitars are fashion and subject to mostly marketing.

    .
     
  16. reckless toboggan

    reckless toboggan Tele-Meister

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    185
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2019
    Location:
    Canada
    Tl;dr

    But I'm pretty sure you can replace any of the big brands above with Facebook, or with Bitcoin, or with Samsung or Apple, or with Coke or Pepsi..., etc etc etc

    Welcome to capitalism where becoming a too-big-to-fail entrenched-monopoly, not innovation variety and choice, is and always has been the goal.

    The real answer, which is actually the foundation of the above, is that research demonstrates that psychologically humans only need 2 (or sometimes 3) brand choices to feel like they have freedom and control. Anything more than that and people become overwhelmed and generally don't make a choice and refrain from purchasing, which is bad for big business.

    The marketed desire for variety is mostly an illusion, human psychology generally dictates a my team vs your team, my tribe vs your tribe, Coke vs Pepsi, Fender vs Gibson, false dichotomy type of dynamic, which generally only leaves room for about two "choices" at the very top of the game.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2019
  17. Donny Osmond fan

    Donny Osmond fan Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    Posts:
    898
    Joined:
    May 6, 2018
    Location:
    Uknown.
    Sears had Roy Smeck pro model guitars. And a few semi hollows. Kent had 4 pro models. With no famous name attached to them. Barney Kessel had pro models made by Kay, and Gibson. But it did not matter who played them. Supro too. They were not wanted.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    FenderGyrl and Wildcard_35 like this.
  18. hopdybob

    hopdybob Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,100
    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    netherlands
    thank you ;-)
     
  19. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    60
    Posts:
    4,239
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    Posting under the influence of late night beverages is always a bad idea.


    You should play whatever guitars you like, regardless of what other people play.


    The background to this entire subject is the collector market, in which interest shifted to the less popular brands after the popular brands got too expensive. Now people pay surprisingly large amounts of money for electric guitars that parents back in the day tossed in the trash can after junior lost interest. Old Danos are great in their way but man that was one cheaply made guitar. It's fun to see some of those old guitars being restored and used.

    Personally I think the orthodoxy of fender/gibson solid bodies is kind of tiresome. I built my own fully hollow body tele, sort of like the Airline tuxedo in that it's fully hollow with a flat top and the thickness of a standard tele. It gets a different sound than a standard tele, sound that i like, but its not your standard tele sound--which is a great sound, sure. But it's not the only sound.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2019
    P Thought, Wildcard_35 and Flakey like this.
  20. tlsmack

    tlsmack Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,231
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2007
    Location:
    Lonk I-lant, New York
    Many of the smaller brands you mentioned produced great sounding guitars, but where quirky in terms of stability and consistency. The pros gravitated towards the big brand names largely for the reliability I bet.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.