Ever wondered what kind of guy the former owner of a guitar was? Well, the one who owned this lot was a tinkerer.

Blazer

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Posts
17,614
Age
46
Location
The Netherlands
Okay, some explanation first, I was made aware of this estate sale of guitars a few months ago, their former owner had died, and his family had no idea what to do with those instruments. So they ended up selling them for an undisclosed figure to a local shop.

That shop owner contacted me straight away but having to buy a new car, I simply couldn't buy the whole shebang from them at that time. Today, however, I figured, let's go there and see what that estate sale had. There were ten guitars in total, which included four cheap (As in the kind of crappy "Hudson" branded strat copies, you'll never be able to get rid of.) electrics. And so I diverted my attention to the acoustics instead. The shop owner gave me an impossible to refuse price for the six acoustics, and they went home with me.

So what did I get?
DSC03141.JPG

This is the only guitar of the lot which didn't have some crazy DIY repair done to it. The label says “Sorrento”, no mention of its origin. But I think it's probably Korean. After a good cleaning and a fresh set of strings, she sounds perfectly.

Next up, what would have been the coolest guitar of the lot.
DSC03142.JPG

THIS is a Japanese made Aria Concert series AC-40, all solid woods. Like the Sorrento, she cleaned up nicely and sounds amazing. But look very closely at the top of the guitar.
DSC03144.JPG

Yeah, apparently the top sustained damage, and he repaired it by glueing half the top of another classical guitar on top of it, I frankly thought I saw it all...

DSC03145.JPG

… Until I saw THIS one. This is a sixties eastern European "Musima" branded Parlor. Which actually had a humbucker fitted in the soundhole. No ground wire however, so the pickup didn't live up to the "Humbucker" title. I ended up removing the pickup and all the wiring. As it plays and sounds just fine.

DSC03146.JPG

This "Sherwood" branded 12 string was set up as a six string with a wooden saddle and its bridge held in place with two hefty screws. I also discovered a patched up rectangular hole in its back where apparently a battery pack used to sit. The rosette is missing, and I found out why: there's four filled holes around the soundhole, apparently it had a pickup fitted much like the Musima.
DSC03147.JPG
Yeah, I only discovered that the neck was coming off when I readied it for this photo.
DSC03149.JPG


And last but far from least.
DSC03148.JPG

This probably was that guy's first guitar, it's a fifties Egmond "Symphonie" archtop jazz. Which aside from it missing its bridge and pickguard is in remarkable condition. But this being an Egmond, it's unplayable, the neck is warped in seven different directions.

So what am I going to do with these?

I'll keep the Sorrento as I love the way it sounds.
If I keep the Egmond, I'll probably take the neck off and make it a playable neck from scratch and probably fit it with P-90's.
The rest of the lot will go for sale, and I'll sell them with a profit.
 

Bob Womack

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 28, 2016
Posts
2,425
Location
Between Clever and Stupid
View attachment 989232
This "Sherwood" branded 12 string was set up as a six string with a wooden saddle and its bridge held in place with two hefty screws. I also discovered a patched up rectangular hole in its back where apparently a battery pack used to sit. The rosette is missing, and I found out why: there's four filled holes around the soundhole, apparently it had a pickup fitted much like the Musima.
I'm pretty sure that is a Taylor bridge. Wildly out of context.

Bob
 




Top